Announcements

Lexicons of Early Modern English

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.213  Tuesday, 7 June 2016

 

From:        UTP Journals <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 7, 2016 at 11:35:37 AM EDT

Subject:    Lexicons of Early Modern English 

 

Lexicons of Early Modern English now includes over 754,000 word-entries!

 

http://bit.ly/_leme

 

Lexicons of Early Modern English is an ever-expanding historical database offering scholars unprecedented access to early books and manuscripts documenting the growth and development of the English language. 

 

LEME sets the standard for modern linguistic research on the English language.
LEME provides researchers with more than 754,000 word-entries from 209 monolingual, bilingual, and polyglot dictionaries, lexical encyclopedias, hard-word glossaries, spelling lists, and lexically-valuable treatises surviving in print or manuscript from the Tudor, Stuart, Caroline, Commonwealth, and Restoration periods.

 

LEME users rave about the vastness of the database and the unparalleled access to content and word meaning from within the context of the era, free from 20th century ideas and interpretations.

 

Recently added to Lexicons of Early Modern English - http://bit.ly/_leme

 

·         Mary Johnson, Madam Johnson’s Present (1755)

·         Elisha Coles, The Compleat English Schoolmaster or the 

·         Most Natural and Easie Method of Spelling English (1674)

·         Benjamin N. Defoe, A New English Dictionary (1735) 

·         Nathan Bailey, Universal Etymological English Dictionary (1737)

·         White Kennett, Parochial Antiquities (1695)

·         Ortus Vocabulorum (1500)

 

The addition of Ortus Vocabulorum completes LEME’s series of the four large Latin and English dictionaries in manuscript and print at the end of the fifteenth century (Promptorium Parvulorum, Catholicon Anglicum, Medulla Grammatice in Pepys MS 2002, and Ortus).

 

Coming soon to LEME

 

·         Henry Hexham, A Copious English and Netherdutch Dictionary (1641-42)

·         Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language (1755)

 

Use Modern Techniques to Research Early Modern English!

 

209 Searchable lexicons

161 Fully analyzed lexicons

754,252 Total word entries

551,781 Fully analyzed word entries

680,473 Total analyzed forms and subforms

551,782 Total analyzed forms

128,691 Total analyzed subforms

60,891   Total English modern headwords

 

LEME provides exciting opportunities for research for historians of the English language. More than a half-million word-entries devised by contemporary speakers of early modern English describe the meaning of words, and their equivalents in languages such as French, Italian, Spanish, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and other tongues encountered then in Europe, America, and Asia.

 

For a partial bibliography of publications that employ LEME, see herehttp://bit.ly/lemebiblio

 

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University of Toronto Press Journals 

5201 Dufferin St., Toronto, ON, Canada M3H 5T8

Tel: (416) 667-7810 Fax: (416) 667-7881 

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www.utpjournals.com/leme

http://leme.library.utoronto.ca/

 

Posted by T Hawkins

 

 

 

Announcing #TFTVLive - Watch Hyde Park Live Online Friday 10 June

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.212  Tuesday, 7 June 2016

 

From:        Ollie Jones <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 6, 2016 at 6:49:33 AM EDT

Subject:    Announcing #TFTVLive - Watch Hyde Park Live Online Friday 10 June

 

This week (9-11 June) we in the Department of Theatre, Film and Television, University of York, are staging James Shirley’s rarely-staged masterpiece, Hyde Park. For those who cannot make it York, we are also live-streaming the show on Friday 10th, 7:30 BST. We hope that SHAKSPER members might be interested in this. 

 

Announcing #TFTVLive

 

This week, the Department of Theatre, Film and Television at the University of York presents the fourth in a series of rarely-staged early modern plays:

 

Hyde Park by James Shirley

9, 10, 11 June 2016

7:30pm, Scenic Stage Theatre

Directed by Prof. Mike Cordner, designed by Roberto del Pino.

 

Now, for the first time, we can announce that the Friday 7:30pm performance will be streamed live via our production website at

hydeparktftv.com/tftv-live/

 

The stream is free to access. A mastered edit will be made available subsequently. 

 

Send us your tweets to @hydeparktftv using #tftvlive !

 

Join us in York - some tickets still available for performances on 9, 10, 11 June

 

Is razor-sharp wit a true defence against love? 

 

It’s festival time in Hyde Park – a place for amorous intrigue, unexpected encounters, and transformations of fortune.  Three women, setting their own rules, make life-defining choices – and teach the men who pursue them a lesson in the process. 

 

In a play where Hollywood screwball comedy meets Much Ado About Nothing, James Shirley’s brilliantly funny 1632 comedy is moved to vibrant modern London, where, during one momentous day in Hyde Park, the characters’ lives will change forever.

 

Very best wishes,

Ollie Jones

Lecturer in Theatre

Careers Liaison Officer

Undergraduate Admissions Tutor

Department of Theatre, Film and Television

The University of York

Heslington East Campus, Baird Lane

York YO10 5GB

Research Associate

Shakespeare’s Globe

 

 

 

Explanation to Subscribers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.208  Tuesday, 7 June 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Subject:     Explanation

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

The surgery I had several weeks ago was the most complex one I have ever had on my foot/leg and the most painful one I have ever experienced. When the dressings came off for the first time, there was a significant problem that needed to be taken care of. We tried one method first, and then it became clear that the only course was to have another surgery as soon as possible. That one was on Tuesday after Memorial Day. It was not as complex, but involved one long incision among other things and thus great pain. Yesterday was the first day I could sit in a chair for a while without having my foot elevated. First, I did my finances because they were a mess; and when I was ready to turn to editing SHAKSPER, I had to leave for dinner and a celebration of my son-in-law’s fortieth birthday. 

 

I turn to the submissions now, but late Thursday evening, I leave for a week in Devon at Sharpham House, where the Wi-Fi is spotty as best. I don’t think I will be able to edit SHAKSPER but who knows. 

 

I am sorry for all these interruptions; I did not anticipate them.

 

If anyone wishes me well, there is no need to do so in an e-mail—I have enough to do as it is, and I simply acknowledge your good wishes before hand.

 

Hardy m. Cook

Editor of SHAKSPER

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

 

Podcasts

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.211  Tuesday, 7 June 2016

 

[1] From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         May 31, 2016 at 8:27:21 AM EDT

     Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and Eco-Critical Theory 

 

[2] From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 7, 2016 at 10:28:12 AM EDT

     Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and Ecofeminism 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 31, 2016 at 8:27:21 AM EDT

Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and Eco-Critical Theory

 

https://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/2016/05/20/shakespeare-and-contemporary-theory-24-shakespeare-and-ecocritical-theory-with-gabriel-egan/

 

What does it mean to approach Shakespeare’s plays through the lens of ecocriticism? Neema welcomes back Gabriel Egan to talk about his volume for the Arden Shakespeare and Theory series, Shakespeare and Ecocritical Theory.

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 7, 2016 at 10:28:12 AM EDT

Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and Ecofeminism

 

http://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/2016/06/07/shakespeare-and-contemporary-theory-25-shakespeare-and-ecofeminist-theory-with-rebecca-laroche-and-jennifer-munroe/

 

Neema interviews Rebecca Laroche and Jennifer Munroe about their forthcoming book Shakespeare and Ecofeminist Theory for the Arden Shakespeare and Theory series. Links for the Early Modern Recipes Online Collective and the Recipes Project can be found below, as well as a recipe for “Candy Angelica”.

 

EMROC (Early Modern Recipes Online Collective): http://emroc.hypotheses.org/

 

Recipes Project: http://recipes.hypotheses.org/

 

“To Candy Angelica” (from “Cookbook of Mary Cruso and Timothy Cruso,” c.1689, Folger MS x.d.24)

 

Take it in April, when tis young, cut it in lengths ___ nail long, lay it in water a day & Night, then boil it tender, shift it once in a boiling; then take it up & strain it, then put it In your preserving pan with a little sugar, & as much water as will cover it, set it on a slow fire, & it will turn green; then take it out & drayne it; to a pound of Angelica take a pound of double refined sugar; then take half the sugar, and a little water, and preserve it in it; let it lie in that syrup a week; drayne it from the syrup, put the other half pound to candy, then put your Angelica to it; let it boil a little till it is candyed, then lay it out upon your sieve to dry.

 

 

 

British Shakespeare Association – Hull 2016

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.210  Tuesday, 7 June 2016

 

From:        BSA <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 1, 2016 at 11:43:50 AM EDT

Subject:    British Shakespeare Association – Hull 2016

 

Registration for Hull 2016

 

The BSA’s 2016 conference, ‘Shakespearean Transformations: Death, Life, and Afterlives’, takes place 8-11 September 2016 at the University of Hull. Registration for the conference is now open. The early bird rate (before 1 July) is £180/£90 concession, and the conference dinner at The Deep aquarium will cost £40. All participants must be members of the BSA in good standing. 15 bursaries for postgraduate students will also be available, and details will be posted on the conference website shortly. Please visit the conference website for full details.

 

 

 

Announcement: New Series

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.209  Tuesday, 7 June 2016

 

From:        Helen M. Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 3, 2016 at 10:11:44 AM EDT

Subject:    Announcement: New Series

 

Late Tudor and Stuart Drama:

Gender, Performance, and Material Culture

 

Series editors: Cristina León Alfar, Hunter College, CUNY, and Helen Ostovich, McMaster University

 

Publisher: MIP University Press at Kalamazoo (https://mip-archumanitiespress.org/series/mip/)

 

This series provides a forum for monographs and essay collections that investigate the material culture, broadly conceived, of theatre and performance in England from the late Tudor to the pre-Restoration Stuart periods (c. 1550–1650).  The editors invite proposals for book-length studies engaging in the material vitality of the dramatic text, political culture, theatre and performance history, theatrical design, performance spaces, gendering court entertainments, child- and adult-actors, music, dance, and audiences in London and on tour. We are also interested in the discursive production of gender, sex, and race in early modern England in relation to material historical, social, cultural, and political structures; changes to and effects of law; monarchy and the republic in dramatic texts; theatre and performance, including performance spaces that are not in theatres.  Further topics might include the production and consumption of things and ideas; costumes, props, theatre records and accounts, gendering of spaces and geographies (court, tavern, street, and household, rural or urban), cross-dressing, military or naval excursions, gendered pastimes, games, behaviours, rituals, fashions, and encounters with the exotic, the non-European, the disabled, and the demonic and their reflection in text and performance.

 

To submit a proposal, please contact Erika Gaffney, Senior Acquisitions Editor, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Best wishes,

Helen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~english/Faculty/Ostovich.html

Founding Editor, Early Theatre <http://earlytheatre.org/>

Professor Emeritus, English and Cultural Studies

McMaster University

Hamilton ON L8S 4L9  

Canada

 

 

 

Podcast on Shakespeare and Feminist Theory

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.195  Wednesday, 25 May 2016

 

From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 13, 2016 at 2:12:21 AM EDT

Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and Feminist Theory

 

http://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/2016/05/13/shakespeare-and-contemporary-theory-23-shakespeare-and-feminist-theory-with-marianne-novy/

 

Why is feminist theory important to the study of Shakespeare’s plays? Neema is joined by Marianne Novy, author of the forthcoming book Shakespeare and Feminist Theory, for the Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series.

 

 

 

Macbeth, Macbeth Book Launch

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.194  Wednesday, 25 May 2016

 

From:        Annie Martirosyan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 5:48 PM

Subject:     Mac, Mac

 

Something wicked this way comes... Macbeth, Macbeth is a novel by Ewan Fernie and Simon Palfrey, based on Shakespeare’s Macbeth and inspired by Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov (much to my anticipation and delight!). 

 

The book launch takes place in The Other Place in Stratford-upon-Avon on 10 June (see poster attached).

 

And here is the trailer of the book https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6U0X66RM1MlZjRwM0VrekRsb1E/view 

 

 

 

 

CFP for RSA

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.193  Wednesday, 25 May 2016

 

From:        Julia Griffin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 21, 2016 at 11:08:34 PM EDT

Subject:    CFP for RSA

 

Call for Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Chicago, 30 March-1 April 2017

 

 

A Woman Well Reputed?  Porcia/Portia from Antiquity to the Renaissance

 

Cato’s daughter; Brutus’ wife.  This panel will consider the figure of Porcia in the Renaissance, where she is to be found in a wide range of cultures and genres.  From the earliest accounts, Porcia has been something of a a paradox: heroic and vulnerable; the masculine soul who is also the devoted wife.   No woman in history can have passed into legend more closely defined by her menfolk; let’s give her some room of her own.

 

Topics might include, but are certainly not limited to:

 

National traditions (eg. Spanish lyrical Porcias; French tragic Porcias)

Exemplary Porcias

Porcia in the visual arts

Female suicide: strength or weakness?

Gender transgression

Classical traditions and subversions

Shakespeare, sources and successors

 

Please send proposals (max. 150 words) to Julia Griffin [This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.] by 1st June 2016

 

 

 

Coming Soon: Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by the Marlowe Dramatic Society

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.192  Tuesday, 24 May 2016

 

From:        Kirk McElhearn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 22, 2016 at 4:58:36 AM EDT

Subject:    Coming Soon: Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by the Marlowe Dramatic Society

 

http://www.mcelhearn.com/coming-soon-shakespeare-the-complete-works-by-the-marlowe-dramatic-society/

 

Coming Soon: Shakespeare: The Complete Works, by the Marlowe Dramatic Society

 

Amazon is good at showing me things that I want to buy. Yesterday, it presented this forthcoming set of Shakespeare’s complete plays and poems, recorded on the Argo label from 1957 to 1964. The 101-CD set will be released in late July. (Amazon UK)

 

From the Amazon description:

 

“This complete and unabridged collection of Shakespeare’s 37 plays, performed by The Marlowe Dramatic Society and Professional Players, plus all of the 154 Sonnets combined with the 4 narrative poems comes together to create an ultimate collection in one boxset. The recordings feature celebrated actors such as Sir John Gielgud, Richard Pasco, Dame Prunella Scales, Sir Ian McKellen, Sir Trevor Nunn, Oscar winner Dame Peggy Ashcroft, Patrick Wymarck, and more.”

 

You can read more about the Marlowe Dramatic Society in this 2007 article from The Telegraph. One interesting comment is about what seems like a fundamentalist approach to performance:

“Rylands’s insistence on a delivery of verse that was precise and meaningful without recourse to rhetorical affectation or excessive emotion was integral to the philosophy of the Royal Shakespeare Company, founded in 1960 by Marlowe graduates Peter Hall and John Barton, and has its other great monument in the recordings of Shakespeare’s complete oeuvre which he directed between 1957 and 1964 under the Marlowe’s auspices for the Argo label.”

The article continues, saying, “Today, Rylands’s prescriptions are questioned, and the approach to the text has become freer…”

 

So my guess is these recordings may sound a bit stilted, compared to today’s Shakespeare productions; more like Olivier than Branagh. Nevertheless, this is an interesting historical document, and at £145 for 101 CDs, is a bargain. For now, it’s only listed on Amazon UK, but it may later be available in the US. If so, I’ll update this article.

 

It’s worth pointing out that there is another complete set of Shakespeare’s plays on CD, one that is quite extraordinary. The Complete Archangel Shakespeare features a number of well known actors from the Royal Shakespeare Company, such as David Tennant, Simon Russel Beale, Damien Lewis, Brian Cox, Jane Lapotaire, Adrien Lester, Joseph Fiennes, and many more. The production of these recordings is as good as it gets. The set is, however, quite expensive, though it is much cheaper in the US than in the UK. (Amazon.com, Amazon UK)

 

Best,

Kirk

 

 

 

Nude Tempest in Central Park

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.191  Tuesday, 24 May 2016

 

From:        Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 21, 2016 at 11:18:29 AM EDT

Subject:    Nude Tempest in Central Park

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/nude-all-women-shakespeare_us_573f78a1e4b045cc9a710e0c

 

Nude, All-Women Production Of Shakespeare’s ‘The Tempest’ Honors Free Expression

 

“O, wonder! How many goodly creatures are there here!”

 

Shakespeare’s plays express an affinity for expressive dress. In “The Taming of the Shrew,” the caddish Petruchio withholds food, sleep and beautiful attire from his new bride as punishment for her forwardness, hoping to change her ways. In “Twelfth Night” and “The Merchant of Venice,” women disguise themselves as men in order to achieve their goals.

 

If outfits are favorite motifs of the Bard, what should we make of a clothes-free production of one of his best-known plays, “The Tempest”? According to co-director Alice Mottola, who headed up such a production performed this week at Summit Rock in New York City’s Central Park, nudity graces the play with themes of free expression and equality across cultures. This interpretation makes sense; the play, for those unfamiliar, is about an aristocratic crew caught in a storm that brings them to an island rich with magic and isolated inhabitants.

 

The production company describes the aesthetic choice on its site as such:

 

This Tempest focuses on the contrast between the harsh restrictions of “civilization” — where political maneuvering costs thrones and lives — and the Edenic, magic-suffused tropical island on which the sorcerer Prospero and his daughter Miranda have lived in exile for twelve years. The contrast will be dramatized not only through performance and staging but also through inventive and integral use of costuming, with the harrowed, conspiring shipwreck victims initially forced to navigate the play’s island setting in constricting outfits suggestive of European aristocracy.

 

The play’s “selective use of nudity to dramatize ‘The Tempest’’s central themes of alienation and reconciliation,” the company continues, “builds on a long tradition of free expression in theatrical productions held in outdoor settings.”

 

Modern takes on Shakespeare’s plays aren’t uncommon. His stories are often adapted into contemporary novelizations, the most recent slate published by Hogarth, including a forthcoming rewrite of “The Tempest” by Margaret Atwood, confronting the threats posed by global warming.

 

Another recent political take on The Bard involved an all-women production of “The Taming of the Shrew,” one of the playwright’s “problem plays,” for its arguably oppressive themes. The director, Rebecca Patterson, told The Huffington Post, “I don’t think [casting women] changes the meaning. What it does is liberate the play from simplistic gender politics into its deeper universal humanity.”

Check out Mottola’s liberating, nude production — co-directed by Pitr Strait and co-produced with the Outdoor Co-ed Topless Pulp Fiction Appreciation Society — of “The Tempest” below.

 

Yours,

Sean Lawrence

Associate Professor and Associate Head of Critical Studies

University of British Columbia, Okanagan

 

 

 

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