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Marjorie Garber: “Occupy Shakespeare”

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.126  Wednesday, 12 March 2014

 

From:        Newstok Scott < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         March 11, 2014 at 11:22:11 PM EDT

Subject:    Marjorie Garber: “Occupy Shakespeare” 

 

March 27: Lecture by Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Marjorie Garber (Harvard University):

 

“Occupy Shakespeare: Shakespeare and/in the Humanities”

 

7pm, Hardie Auditorium, Rhodes College. Free and open to the public.

 

http://www.rhodes.edu/garber

 

There was a time when Shakespeare’s plays were not considered serious enough, or appropriate for, study in libraries or universities. And there was a time, a slightly later time, when Shakespeare’s plays were considered the property of a subset of the learned class, different from, and distinct from, the practitioners of applied or practical knowledge. Today the plays are part of contemporary culture, in popular music, advertising, and journalistic headlines; and they are also part of literary culture, the culture of “the humanities.” In fact, for many people, Shakespeare is the humanities, quoted, cited, and sung as an authority on philosophy, statecraft, character, love and death. What’s next for Shakespeare studies, in and beyond the academy? What can the itinerary of “Shakespeare” in the last hundred years tell us about the future of the humanities in the twenty-first century?

 

Marjorie Garber is the William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of English and Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University, and Chair of the Committee on Dramatic Arts. She has published seventeen books and edited seven collections of essays on topics from Shakespeare to literary and cultural theory to the arts and intellectual life. Garber has served as Director of the Humanities Center at Harvard, Chair of the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies, and Director of the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts. She is the former President of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes and a continuing member of its advisory board. She currently serves as a Trustee of the English Institute and on the Board of Directors of the American Council of Learned Societies and a member of the American Philosophical Society. In 2010, she chaired the judging committee of the non-fiction category of the National Book Awards. This past summer, she was a featured commentator on the BBC/PBS television series, “Shakespeare Uncovered.”

 

Garber’s visit is co-sponsored by the Rhodes College chapter of Phi Beta Kappa; the Department of English; the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Greek & Roman Studies; the Pearce Shakespeare Endowment; the Search program; and the Spence L. Wilson Chair in Humanities.

 

Please contact Scott Newstok ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) for further information.

 

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ABOUT THE PEARCE SHAKESPEARE ENDOWMENT

 

www.rhodes.edu/shakespeare

 

Thanks to the generosity of the late Dr. Iris Annette Pearce, Rhodes College enjoys an unusually wide range of Shakespeare-related resources. The Pearce Shakespeare Endowment was established in 2007 to enrich courses in Shakespeare and support events for the entire campus as well as the greater Memphis community. Dr. Pearce attended Rhodes College in the 1940s, when it was named Southwestern at Memphis, before graduating from Vanderbilt University. During World War II, she joined the women’s corps of the U.S. Naval Reserve (WAVES). As a medical student, she followed a long-established path in her family, where four generations of physicians preceded her. Yet she was also breaking new ground as a woman: she was one of only two female students in her University of Tennessee class; she served as the first female internal medicine resident at John Gaston Hospital (The Med); and she eventually became the director of the City of Memphis Hospitals while serving as a professor at the University of Tennessee. Her bequest generously continues to support her lifelong enthusiasm for Shakespeare. The late professor of Shakespeare studies at Rhodes, Dr. Cynthia Marshall, was instrumental in establishing preliminary planning for this bequest.

 
 

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