Announcements

Early Bird Registration for the British Shakespeare Association Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.229  Thursday, 7 July 2016

 

From:        BSA <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 17, 2016 at 11:02:27 AM EDT

Subject:    Early Bird Registration for the British Shakespeare Association Conference closes soon

 

Dear all,

 

This is a reminder that Early Bird registration for the BSA biennial conference in Hull closes at the end of this month. After July 1st, registration prices will increase from £180 to £200 for full price registration (£90 to £100 for concessions). All speakers must be registered in advance. If you have questions, please email the conference team at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . You can access registration at the conference website.

 

Please note that all registrants must be members of the British Shakespeare Association in good standing. If you need to renew your membership, please do so first on the BSA website. If you think you have already paid for this year but need to check your membership number or status, please get in touch with the membership officer at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

Please remember to leave sufficient time between renewing your membership and registering for the conference. The membership officer will endeavour to respond to all messages as quickly as possible, but membership renewal is not instantaneous.

 

Kind regards,

Peter Kirwan

BSA Membership Officer

 

 

 

Speaking of Shakespeare with Peter Holland

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.228  Thursday, 7 July 2016

 

From:        John Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 14, 2016 at 2:46:29 PM EDT

Subject:    Speaking of Shakespeare with Peter Holland

 

Speaking of Shakespeare  

With Peter Holland of the

University of Notre Dame 

 

Monday, June 20, at 8 p.m.

The National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, Manhattan

Admission Free, but Reservations Requested

 

As Associate Dean for the Arts at the University of Notre Dame, Peter Holland oversees a highly regarded Shakespeare festival and helps administer Actors From The London Stage, a touring educational program that has helped transform the teaching of dramatic literature in the United States. Professor Holland is admired around the globe for his work as editor of Shakespeare Survey. He also edits Great Shakespeareans, an eighteen-volume set from Bloomsbury, and co-edits Oxford Shakespeare Topics, an indispensable reference collection with twenty volumes now in print. For years Dr. Holland directed the Shakespeare Institute, a Stratford-based academy under the auspices of the University of Birmingham, and in that capacity he presided over the biennial International Shakespeare Conference. 

 

Dr. Holland's acclaimed scholarly editions of the plays include A Midsummer Night's Dream for the Oxford Shakespeare series and Coriolanus for the Arden Shakespeare's third series. His many book-length titles include The Ornament of Action, Rethinking British Theatre History, and English Shakespeares: Shakespeare on the English Stage in the 1990s. He has written extensively about Shakespeare in performance, and audiences at London's National Theatre have long enjoyed his lucid program notes for productions under the aegis of artistic director Nicholas Hytner, who studied under Dr. Holland at the University of Cambridge.

 

See www.shakesguild.org/events.html for detail about this and other Shakespeare Guild offerings. And please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you wish to take part in Dr. Holland's wide-ranging conversation with the Guild's john Andrews.   

 

 

 

 

Call for Seminar Papers and Call for Workshop Participation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.227  Thursday, 7 July 2016

 

From:        Yukari Yoshihara <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 13, 2016 at 12:26:49 PM EDT

Subject:    Call for Seminar Papers and Call for Workshop Participation

 

Dear Shakespearean friends,

 

Greetings from Yukari, secretary of Asian Shakespeare Association !

 

Apologies for cross-posting, please find attached call for Seminar Papers at Asian Shakespeare Association Biennial Conference, 1-3 Dec 2016, New Delhi.

 

I will appreciate if you can circulate CFP among those who might be interested in participating.  Thank you in advance.

 

The deadline for abstract submission is 15 July 2016.

 

Sincerely,

Yukari Yoshihara (Secretary), ASA

 

Call for Seminar papers ASA:  pdf Call for Seminar papers ASA final (1.13 MB)

Call for workshop participation:  pdf Call for workshop participation revised (1.10 MB)

 

**********

Call for Seminar Papers 

 

Seminars are always exciting and enlightening academic occasions. They give participants opportunities for close analysis and profitable discussion of their papers.

 

Seminar papers, which need to be focused but not too long (3000 words approx.), will be circulated in advance and commented upon among all seminar members. Each participant will have 10 minutes to summarize and expound their papers so as to open up a fruitful discussion among seminar members, initiated by the proposer of the seminar.

 

Now we would like to invite you to join the Seminars given below. Even if you have already had your paper proposal accepted, you can still join the seminar instead by withdrawing the proposal. If you are interested in one of the seminars below, please submit a new abstract for the seminar of your choice by 15 July 2016.

 

Please send a 250-word abstract and brief bio-data to the seminar leader and the administration office at <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>. The deadline for abstracts is 15 July 2016.

 

Seminars Proposed for ASA New Delhi

 

1. Shakespeare and Today’s Technology

 

In today’s world, technology affects every single aspect of our lives, including the teaching, studying, performing, and enjoying of Shakespeare. Searchable and downloadable online texts, images, and videos have made Shakespeare more accessible and affordable. In the democratic world of the Internet, everyone is free to contribute, to create and to comment, to interpret and to parody. New methodologies have also been proposed. Other than small conveniences (such as YouTube videos) and small annoyances (such as student plagiarism), is technology changing, improving, or endangering the Shakespeare as we have always known it in any fundamental ways? Are there any measures that we should take? You are invited to share your experience, analyze its pros and cons, and theorize the phenomenon. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

 

--performances involving cutting-edge technology

--study tools

--research tools

--teaching tools and platforms

--digital theatre archives

--e-publishing, blogging, online forums

--data science

--YouTube

--social media

--authenticity, aura, ownership

--globalization

--ethics

--legal issues

 

Proposer / Leader Bi-qi Beatrice Lei This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Bi-qi Beatrice Lei is Founder of the Asian Shakespeare Association. She is currently a researcher at the Research Center for Digital Humanities, National Taiwan University. She is a co-editor of Shakespeare in Culture (with Perng Ching-Hsi) and Shakespeare’s Asian Journeys (with Judy Celine Ick and Poonam Trivedi) 

 

2. Shakespeare is pop ---is he? 

 

We have a large variety of pop adaptations / rip-offs / second order re-creations of Shakespear: some faithful transmedial translation, others outrageous pirating, still others that have almost nothing to do with Shakespeare (e.g. David Bowie’s Thin White Duke, King Stefan of Maleficent, possibly a caricature of Macbeth), and the ultimate, ‘Shakespeare’ rubber ducks. Analysis of such Shakespeare-made-pop has gained a certain academic respectability, now that adaptation studies are one of the hip fields in the age of the decline of humanities and English studies.

 

This seminar aims to contextualize the complex negotiations, struggles and challenges between high culture and pop culture, between authoritative cultural products and consumer products for dummies on global scale. Are pop Shakespeares simply sycophantic to the Bard’s authority? Or are they butchering the immortal swan of Avon? Or, would it be more profitable to think of the power game between Shakespeare the original and the Shakespop as having “reciprocal legitimation” (Lanier)?

 

Let us investigate the cultural politics of making Shakespeare pop. After sharing our geeky knowledge about pop Shakespeares, let us work together to think whether it is possible (or desirable) to theorize this phenomenon within the framework of the glocalization of Shakespeare’s works. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

 

- Shakespeare as a popular writer /icon

- Pop Stage performance (including opera and musicals)

- Fashion

- Memes

- Computer games

- Comics/ anime/ manga

- Films

 

Proposer / Leader Yukari Yoshihara This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Yukari Yoshihara is an associate professor at the University of Tsukuba. Her publications include ‘Tacky Shakespeare in Japan,’ in Multicultural Shakespeare vol.10, no. 25(2013), ‘The First Japanese Adaptation of Othello (1903) and Japanese Colonialism,’ in Bi-Qi Beatrice Lei and Ching-Hsi Perng (eds.), Shakespeare in Culture (2012), ‘Is This Shakespeare?: Inoue Hidenori’s Adaptations of Shakespeare,’ in Poonam Trivedi and Minami Ryuta (eds.), Re-Playing Shakespeare in Asia (2010) and ‘ Popular Shakespeare in Japan, ’ Shakespeare Survey vol.60, (2007).

 

3. ‘Documents in Madness’: Representing Shakespearean Madness in Asia

 

Scholars have commented on the Renaissance preoccupation with unusual, heightened and aberrant mental states of different kinds and also on their varied representations and interpretations. Expressions of madness, folly, delusions, possession and melancholy proliferate in early modern literature, particularly in drama. Madmen, witches, melancholics and fools crowd Shakespeare’s stage too and bring in different registers of language and performance. The representation and enactment of madness becomes a site for philosophical, moral, religious, mystical and political debates as in the case of Lady Macbeth, Lear, Ophelia, Hamlet as well as the wise fools in the comedies and tragedy. There is also a particular interest in examining the interface between forms of insanity and the theatre—madness is seen as a performed and performable state, making it difficult to understand the difference between authentic and pretended madness as in Hamlet.

 

This seminar will focus on Asian recreations (and others as comparative contrasts) of Shakespearean madness in translations, adaptations, stage and screen versions with a specific focus on exploring the cultural codes through which madness is understood, represented and interpreted in different Asian cultures. The contributions should attempt to discuss how these representations initiate conversations between early modern and Asian modes of understanding and reading madness, and underline the importance of culture in constructing the discursive context of madness which is so much more than a medical or psychiatric condition.

 

Proposer / Leader Paromita Chakravarti This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Paromita Chakravarti is a professor in the Department of English, Jadavpur University, Kolkata and has been the Director of the School of Women's Studies, Jadavpur University. Her doctoral work at the University of Oxford has been on early modern discourses of madness and folly and she has written extensively on the historiography of folly, mad women on the Elizabethan stage and the medical discourses of madness. She teaches in the areas of early modern drama, Shakespearean adaptations on stage and screen, Women's writing, Queer studies, Film and literature and education and sexuality. She has been a visiting fellow at the universities of Delhi, Hyderabad, Oxford, Liverpool and Birmingham. Her book, Women Contesting Culture, co-edited with Kavita Panjabi was published in 2012. She is currently co-editing a volume on Shakespeare and Indian cinemas with Poonam Trivedi for Routledge.

 

4. ‘For they are the abstract and brief chronicles of the time’: Negotiating Shakespearean Characters in Performance from Past to Present

 

In criticism, relying on character study or treating Shakespearean characters as real people, has often been censured. But, in performance, where actors especially need to get under the skin of the characters they portray, Shakespearean personae do exhibit some kind of biographical reality. 

 

Representations of the Shakespearean characters in performance in the last 400 years, both globally and locally, have been various and multiple, not only influenced by the actor’s and director’s interpretations but also by the geographical location of where the performance is taking place and its historical specificity, socio-political climate and unique and often indigenous performative traditions. That is why although the lines that characters speak in Shakespeare’s play-texts are the same (even if translated in another language), in performance over the times, the ‘idea’ of the character changes, so much so that for example, today, the three witches of Macbeth have been transformed to a spirit in the guise of an old woman in Kurosawa’s Throne of Blood and to two policemen in Vishal Bharadwaj’s Maqbool, all influenced by the above-mentioned conditions.

 

This seminar proposes to look at the characters in Shakespeare’s plays that have in the world of performance, be it theatre, cinema, and mass media, evolved with time and exhibited a life of their own especially in Asia and the implications this has on the metaphorics of the world and stage in Shakespeare’s time and now. Their stories reveal the interpretative and performative trends which have led to the popularization of Shakespeare in Asia.

 

Papers may include, but are not limited to, how Shakespeare’s characters have been used to generate meaning in Asian culture at different points of time, and whether or not the various spin-offs tell us something new both about Shakespeare’s characters and plays as well as the culture which is performing it.

 

Proposer / Leader Paramita Dutta This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Paramita Dutta, M Phil, Ph D, is currently working as Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Rammohan College, Kolkata. She has also taught English literature at the post graduate level in Lady Brabourne College and Maulana Azad College, Kolkata. A student of Jadavpur University she received her doctorate from the same on ‘Marriage and its Portrayal in the Drama of Early Modern England’ in 2013.

 

She has presented papers nationally and internationally and her recent publications include an article on Tagore’s Bidaay Abhishaap and a short story ‘The First Time.’ An article on Shakespeare Wallah is forthcoming in collection of essays by SAGE. She is a member of The Shakespeare Society of India.

 

 

**********

Call for Workshop Participation

Asian Shakespeare

Association Biennial Conference,

1-3 Dec 2016, New Delhi, India.

Call for Workshop Participation

 

Manga Shakespeare: __Why Not Create Your Own Manga Shakespeare with a Professional Artist?

 

The ASA is pleased to announce that we are going to have Harumo Sanazaki, professional Japanese manga artist to conduct a workshop for young people. If you are interested in re-creating Shakespeare’s plays, manga-style, this will be an ideal occasion for you to learn how to draw manga.

 

In this session, you will have a chance to see how a manga artist gets an idea of manga Shakespeare or how you can interpret and create Shakespearean characters and scenes in a manga style visualisation.

 

Harumo Sanazaki, a professional manga creator with more than 300 works and 30 years of experience. She adapted Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Midsummer Night’s Dream and Venus and Adonis, all told from female characters’ point of view in manga. She was also a judge at the first Graphic Shakespeare Competition, held in association with  he international conference ‘Shakespeare -- Next 400 years’ at Elsinore, April 2016.

 

The workshop will take 25 participants out of which half will be

students. Book your place immediately, no later than 15 July

2016.

 

Please write This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Appointment of the Chair of the Board of Trustees of the British Shakespeare Association

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.225  Thursday, 7 July 2016

 

From:        BSA <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 9, 2016 at 10:35:15 AM EDT

Subject:    Appointment of the Chair of the Board of Trustees of the British Shakespeare Association

 

Later this year I will be standing down as Chair of the British Shakespeare Association. These are exciting times for the BSA and we really need your help and support to grow the organisation and further its mission. With this email, I am initiating the search for the next Chair of the Board of Trustees. The Board has developed a transparent process and the role will be advertised widely to ensure that we have the best possible field. A full description of the process is attached and the text of the advert is copied below for those of you unable to open the attachment. Please give the role serious consideration and pass the advert on to anyone who you feel has the skills and experience to lead the BSA. I am hoping that I will be able to introduce the next Chair at the Biennial Conference in Hull later this year.

 

Best wishes

Stuart Hampton-Reeves

Chair of the Board of Trustees

 

The Board of the British Shakespeare Association is looking to appoint a new leadership team from September 2016 onwards. This is an exciting opportunity to lead the Board of the BSA during the year of Shakespeare’s quartercentenary and help take the BSA forward. 

 

We are committed to equality of opportunity for everyone and welcome applications from individuals regardless of their background.

 

Chair of the Board of Trustees of the British Shakespeare Association

The Board of the British Shakespeare Association is looking to appoint a new leadership team from September 2016 onwards. This is an exciting opportunity to lead the Board of the BSA during the year of Shakespeare’s quarter-centenary and help take the BSA forward.

We are committed to equality of opportunity for everyone and welcome applications from individuals regardless of their background.

 

About the BSA

The BSA was founded in 2002 with a mission to bring together academics, teachers, theatre practitioners and other people who work with Shakespeare’s texts into a professional association. In 2007, the BSA was incorporated as a charitable company limited by guarantee with a commitment to educate the general public about Shakespeare and his works. The BSA typically has around 300 paid up members and over 1000 members on its database. Members pay an annual subscription fee of £25 although there are also concessionary rates and since 2014 all Schools-based members have been given free membership. The BSA’s flagship event is its Biennial Conference, which brings together Shakespeareans from all of its communities to discuss latest research and the most recent insights into teaching and performance. Between conferences, the BSA runs a number of other events, most notably an annual Honorary Fellows event. We appoint two Honorary Fellows a year  - past Fellows include Stanley Wells, Chris Grace, Janet Suzman, Cicely Berry and John Russell Brown. The BSA is also associated with two publications: Teaching Shakespeare, a journal edited by Sarah Olive and published through the BSA; and Shakespeare: the Journal of the British Shakespeare Association, which is published by Routledge and is considered to be one of the best academic journals on Shakespeare in the world. The BSA also has a website, www . britishshakespeare . ws, through which news relating to Shakespeare and the BSA is disseminated.

 

About the Board of Trustees

The Board of Trustees (which is also a Board of Directors) is made up of: 4 Officers, 6 elected Trustees, and 3 ex officio Trustees representing the Shakespeare Institute, the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and the Routledge Journal. Three committees also report directly to the Board: the Events Committee, the Fellowship Committee and the Education Committee. The Chairs of these Committees are appointed by the Board and are entitled to attend Board meetings, but can only vote if they are also Trustees. The Board meets three times a year, usually in Stratford-upon-Avon, and holds one Annual General Meeting. As well as overseeing the various activities of the BSA, the Board is responsible for ensuring good governance and for ensuring compliance with auditing requirements for Companies House and the Charity Commission. The Board’s work is governed by three documents: its Articles of Association, the Rules of the BSA, and the Financial Procedures of the BSA. Meetings typically last 2-hours and currently follow a standing agenda.

 

Chair

  

The Chair of the British Shakespeare Association is also the Head of the British Shakespeare Association. The main duty of the Chair is to ensure that the charitable object of the BSA, to educate the general public about Shakespeare’s works, is being fulfilled by its activities. The Chair is responsible for the day-to-day management of the BSA and for working with the Board to set its strategic priorities. This person chairs meetings of the Board and reports to it. The Chair also manages the Officers of the Board (the Treasurer, the Membership Officer and the Web and Communications Officer) and the Chairs of the Board’s Committees to ensure that they are working effectively towards furthering the BSA’s charitable objects. The Chair also chairs the Annual General Meeting.

 

The Board is looking for someone who is committed to the BSA’s vision and is able to work across its different communities in ways that bring them together into a positive and dynamic association.

 

Essential Criteria

1.  A natural negotiator and diplomat who is able to collaborate with other members of the Board and make the most of their talents

2.  A good strategic thinker who is able to balance risk and opportunity to help the BSA grow

3.  An effective leader with good communication skills and the ability to articulate a clear achievable vision for the BSA

4.  Experience of chairing meetings and effectively following up agreed actions

5.  Willing and able to act as the public face of the BSA

6.  Either a long-standing member of the BSA who has demonstrated a commitment to its values or substantial equivalent experience of a cognate charity

7.  IT-literate

 

Desirable

8.  An experienced Chair and/or a Trustee of a charity

9.  Pro-active in using modern technology to engage members

 

As Chair, you will also be a trustee and consequently cannot stand for the Board if you are disqualified from being a trustee either by law or under the constitution of the BSA. For more details on eligibility criteria for trustees, please see this document: https://www . gov . uk/government/publications/finding-new-trustees-cc30/finding-new-trustees

 

The deadline for applications is 15th July 2016. Shortlisted candidates for the Chair will be invited to an informal meeting with the current Board followed by an interview with a panel. This will be held in Stratford during the second week of August.

 

To apply, please send a letter of application, a CV and the names of two referees to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by the appropriate deadline.

 

For an informal discussion about any of these roles please contact Stuart Hampton-Reeves, the outgoing Chair of the Board, by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

Registered Charity No. 1123867

Registered Company No. 6446230 

www.britishshakespeare.ws

 

 

 

Professor Stanley Wells Knighted

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.224  Thursday, 7 July 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, July 7, 2016

Subject:     Professor Stanley Wells Knighted

 

Professor Stanley Wells, CBE knighted in The Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours

 

http://whatsonlive.co.uk/news/professor-stanley-wells-cbe-knighted-in-the-queens-90th-birthday-honours/33951

 

https://www.shakespeare.org.uk/about-us/news-media/press-releases/professor-wells-knighted/

 

The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust is pleased to announce that its Honorary President, Professor Stanley Wells, CBE, has been awarded a knighthood in The Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours list.

 

The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust is pleased to announce that its Honorary President, Professor Stanley Wells, CBE, has been awarded a knighthood in The Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours list.

 

The knighthood is bestowed on Professor Wells in recognition of his services to Shakespeare scholarship.

 

One of the world’s foremost Shakespearians, Professor Well’s distinguished career with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust spans over forty years , first, from 1975,  as representative trustee of the University of Birmingham, later as a Life Trustee and Chairman (1991- 2011). He is also Emeritus Professor of Shakespeare Studies of the University of Birmingham, former Vice-Chairman and now Honorary Emeritus Governor of the Royal Shakespeare Company, Trustee of the Rose theatre, and a member of the Council of Shakespeare’s Globe.

 

A prolific and successful writer, speaker and broadcaster, Stanley is General Editor of the Oxford and Penguin editions of Shakespeare and has written and edited numerous books and other publications on Shakespeare’s life and works. The leading voice of Shakespeare studies, he speaks at numerous conferences and other events, sharing his passion for Shakespeare all over the world.

 

Speaking about the award, Professor Wells says: “I am delighted to receive this honour. I feel myself most fortunate in having been able to spend so much of my life in the company of Shakespeare and of those who admire and enjoy his works. Throughout my career as teacher and scholar I have enjoyed and benefitted enormously from collaborating with fellow scholars from all over the world, and I hope they will share my pleasure in receiving this award.”

 

Peter Kyle, Chairman of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, said, “We are delighted to hear that Professor Wells’s outstanding services to Shakespeare have been recognised by Her Majesty The Queen in the Birthday Honours List. Stanley’s knighthood comes at a particularly wonderful time in the year marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s creative legacy. We offer him the warmest congratulations on this very prestigious honour.”

 

Professor Stanley Wells CBE, Honorary President, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust

 

One of the world’s foremost Shakespearians, Stanley Wells is a Life Trustee and Former Chairman of The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust (1991-2011), Emeritus Professor of Shakespeare Studies of the University of Birmingham, and Honorary Emeritus Governor of the Royal Shakespeare Theatre, of which he was for many years Vice-Chairman. He holds a Ph. D. of the University of Birmingham, is an Honorary Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford and of University College, London and holds honorary doctorates from Furman University, South Carolina, and from the Universities of Munich, Hull, Durham and Warwick, Marburg and Craiova.

 

His books include Literature and Drama; Royal Shakespeare: Studies of Four Major Productions at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre; Modernizing Shakespeare’s spelling; Re-editing Shakespeare for the Modern Reader; and Shakespeare: the Poet and his Plays. He edited A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard II, and The Comedy of Errors for the New Penguin Shakespeare and King Lear for the Oxford Shakespeare. He was for nearly twenty years the editor of the annual Shakespeare Survey, and writes for the New York Review of Books and many other publications. He has edited The New Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare Studies and is General Editor (with Gary Taylor) of The Complete Oxford Shakespeare, co-author of William Shakespeare: A Textual Companion and General Editor of the Penguin Shakespeare. His most recent books are Shakespeare in the Theatre: An Anthology of Criticism; The Oxford Dictionary of Shakespeare; The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (edited with Michael Dobson);Shakespeare For All Time; Looking for Sex in Shakespeare; Shakespeare’s Sonnets and Coffee with Shakespeare, both co-authored with Paul Edmondson; Shakespeare & Co.; Is It True What they Say About Shakespeare?; Shakespeare, Sex, and Love; Great Shakespeare Actors, and William Shakespeare: A Very Short Introduction. Together with Paul Edmondson he has edited Shakespeare Beyond Doubt and The Shakespeare Circle for Cambridge University Press. 

 

Stanley Wells was elected The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust's first Honorary President in June 2011.

 

***********

Professor Stanley Wells CBE knighted in The Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours

 

http://whatsonlive.co.uk/news/professor-stanley-wells-cbe-knighted-in-the-queens-90th-birthday-honours/33951

 

Leading Shakespearean and Honorary President of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Professor Stanley Wells has been awarded a knighthood in the Queen's 90th Birthday Honours list.

 

Among the world’s foremost Shakespearean scholars, Wells’ distinguished career with the Birthplace Trust spans over 40 years, beginning with his position as representative trustee of the University of Birmingham in 1975. He later went on to become a Life Trustee, and chaired the organisation for 20 years between 1991 and 2011, after which he was elected its first Honorary President.

 

As an academic, Wells has a long-standing relationship with Stratford’s Shakespeare Institute, part of the University of Birmingham, which awarded his Ph. D. He is now Emeritus Professor of Shakespeare Studies at the university.  A prolific writer, speaker and broadcaster, his work has earned him international renown, and in addition to his professorship at Birmingham, he also holds honorary doctorates from Furman University in South Carolina, and from the Universities of Munich, Hull, Durham, Warwick, Marburg and Craiova. He is an Honorary Fellow of both Balliol College, Oxford and University College London.

 

Known for his performance-focused approach to editing Shakespeare’s plays, Wells is also Honorary Emeritus Governor of the Royal Shakespeare Theatre, where he formerly served as Vice-Chairman.

 

Said Wells: “I am delighted to receive this honour. I feel myself most fortunate in having been able to spend so much of my life in the company of Shakespeare and of those who admire and enjoy his works. Throughout my career as teacher and scholar I have enjoyed and benefitted enormously from collaborating with fellow scholars from all over the world, and I hope they will share my pleasure in receiving this award.”

 

[ . . . ]

 

 

 

Explanation (Yet Again)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.223  Thursday, 7 July 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, July 7, 2016

Subject:     Explanation (Yet Again)

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

It seems as if I am making far more explanations for interruptions in service than I would care to. But it does seem like now a longer explanation is in order.

 

On December 30, 2015, I had two damaged nerves to my foot decompressed. This has been the only of the six surgeries I have had in the past six months that was directly related to the Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome, Type 2, medical issues I have had for the past almost thirteen years. 

 

The remaining surgeries were because of stiches pulling out and skin grafts not taking. Every time I had another surgery, the size of the wounds on the top of my foot increased. It also seemed that every time I have taken one of my trips to England, I have had these problems flare up. 

 

These surgeries have been very painful and I have been on powerful opioid anti-pain medications. The combination of the pain, the need to keep my foot elevated, the need to have non-weight bearing on the right foot, and the opiates have rendered me incapable of editing SHAKSPER. I have mostly lost the last six months of my life, and I have much, much that needs to be done.

 

My surgeon wants me to see an infectious disease specialist and to have hyperbaric treatments. I have been trying to put these off so that I can catch up some.

 

At the end of July and into the first weeks of August I am going to be in London and Stratford for the theater (any recommendations for the London theater productions are welcome) and for the Shakespeare World Congress. However, there should not be a problem during these three weeks since I will have Internet access and will be bringing my laptop.

 

My next trip to England when I will be without Internet access will be in September. I will notify everyone then of the interruption ahead of time.

 

My apologies, but this has all been out of my control.

 

Hardy

 

 

 

Lexicons of Early Modern English

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.213  Tuesday, 7 June 2016

 

From:        UTP Journals <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 7, 2016 at 11:35:37 AM EDT

Subject:    Lexicons of Early Modern English 

 

Lexicons of Early Modern English now includes over 754,000 word-entries!

 

http://bit.ly/_leme

 

Lexicons of Early Modern English is an ever-expanding historical database offering scholars unprecedented access to early books and manuscripts documenting the growth and development of the English language. 

 

LEME sets the standard for modern linguistic research on the English language.
LEME provides researchers with more than 754,000 word-entries from 209 monolingual, bilingual, and polyglot dictionaries, lexical encyclopedias, hard-word glossaries, spelling lists, and lexically-valuable treatises surviving in print or manuscript from the Tudor, Stuart, Caroline, Commonwealth, and Restoration periods.

 

LEME users rave about the vastness of the database and the unparalleled access to content and word meaning from within the context of the era, free from 20th century ideas and interpretations.

 

Recently added to Lexicons of Early Modern English - http://bit.ly/_leme

 

·         Mary Johnson, Madam Johnson’s Present (1755)

·         Elisha Coles, The Compleat English Schoolmaster or the 

·         Most Natural and Easie Method of Spelling English (1674)

·         Benjamin N. Defoe, A New English Dictionary (1735) 

·         Nathan Bailey, Universal Etymological English Dictionary (1737)

·         White Kennett, Parochial Antiquities (1695)

·         Ortus Vocabulorum (1500)

 

The addition of Ortus Vocabulorum completes LEME’s series of the four large Latin and English dictionaries in manuscript and print at the end of the fifteenth century (Promptorium Parvulorum, Catholicon Anglicum, Medulla Grammatice in Pepys MS 2002, and Ortus).

 

Coming soon to LEME

 

·         Henry Hexham, A Copious English and Netherdutch Dictionary (1641-42)

·         Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language (1755)

 

Use Modern Techniques to Research Early Modern English!

 

209 Searchable lexicons

161 Fully analyzed lexicons

754,252 Total word entries

551,781 Fully analyzed word entries

680,473 Total analyzed forms and subforms

551,782 Total analyzed forms

128,691 Total analyzed subforms

60,891   Total English modern headwords

 

LEME provides exciting opportunities for research for historians of the English language. More than a half-million word-entries devised by contemporary speakers of early modern English describe the meaning of words, and their equivalents in languages such as French, Italian, Spanish, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and other tongues encountered then in Europe, America, and Asia.

 

For a partial bibliography of publications that employ LEME, see herehttp://bit.ly/lemebiblio

 

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Posted by T Hawkins

 

 

 

Announcing #TFTVLive - Watch Hyde Park Live Online Friday 10 June

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.212  Tuesday, 7 June 2016

 

From:        Ollie Jones <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 6, 2016 at 6:49:33 AM EDT

Subject:    Announcing #TFTVLive - Watch Hyde Park Live Online Friday 10 June

 

This week (9-11 June) we in the Department of Theatre, Film and Television, University of York, are staging James Shirley’s rarely-staged masterpiece, Hyde Park. For those who cannot make it York, we are also live-streaming the show on Friday 10th, 7:30 BST. We hope that SHAKSPER members might be interested in this. 

 

Announcing #TFTVLive

 

This week, the Department of Theatre, Film and Television at the University of York presents the fourth in a series of rarely-staged early modern plays:

 

Hyde Park by James Shirley

9, 10, 11 June 2016

7:30pm, Scenic Stage Theatre

Directed by Prof. Mike Cordner, designed by Roberto del Pino.

 

Now, for the first time, we can announce that the Friday 7:30pm performance will be streamed live via our production website at

hydeparktftv.com/tftv-live/

 

The stream is free to access. A mastered edit will be made available subsequently. 

 

Send us your tweets to @hydeparktftv using #tftvlive !

 

Join us in York - some tickets still available for performances on 9, 10, 11 June

 

Is razor-sharp wit a true defence against love? 

 

It’s festival time in Hyde Park – a place for amorous intrigue, unexpected encounters, and transformations of fortune.  Three women, setting their own rules, make life-defining choices – and teach the men who pursue them a lesson in the process. 

 

In a play where Hollywood screwball comedy meets Much Ado About Nothing, James Shirley’s brilliantly funny 1632 comedy is moved to vibrant modern London, where, during one momentous day in Hyde Park, the characters’ lives will change forever.

 

Very best wishes,

Ollie Jones

Lecturer in Theatre

Careers Liaison Officer

Undergraduate Admissions Tutor

Department of Theatre, Film and Television

The University of York

Heslington East Campus, Baird Lane

York YO10 5GB

Research Associate

Shakespeare’s Globe

 

 

 

Explanation to Subscribers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.208  Tuesday, 7 June 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Subject:     Explanation

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

The surgery I had several weeks ago was the most complex one I have ever had on my foot/leg and the most painful one I have ever experienced. When the dressings came off for the first time, there was a significant problem that needed to be taken care of. We tried one method first, and then it became clear that the only course was to have another surgery as soon as possible. That one was on Tuesday after Memorial Day. It was not as complex, but involved one long incision among other things and thus great pain. Yesterday was the first day I could sit in a chair for a while without having my foot elevated. First, I did my finances because they were a mess; and when I was ready to turn to editing SHAKSPER, I had to leave for dinner and a celebration of my son-in-law’s fortieth birthday. 

 

I turn to the submissions now, but late Thursday evening, I leave for a week in Devon at Sharpham House, where the Wi-Fi is spotty as best. I don’t think I will be able to edit SHAKSPER but who knows. 

 

I am sorry for all these interruptions; I did not anticipate them.

 

If anyone wishes me well, there is no need to do so in an e-mail—I have enough to do as it is, and I simply acknowledge your good wishes before hand.

 

Hardy m. Cook

Editor of SHAKSPER

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

 

Podcasts

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.211  Tuesday, 7 June 2016

 

[1] From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         May 31, 2016 at 8:27:21 AM EDT

     Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and Eco-Critical Theory 

 

[2] From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 7, 2016 at 10:28:12 AM EDT

     Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and Ecofeminism 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 31, 2016 at 8:27:21 AM EDT

Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and Eco-Critical Theory

 

https://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/2016/05/20/shakespeare-and-contemporary-theory-24-shakespeare-and-ecocritical-theory-with-gabriel-egan/

 

What does it mean to approach Shakespeare’s plays through the lens of ecocriticism? Neema welcomes back Gabriel Egan to talk about his volume for the Arden Shakespeare and Theory series, Shakespeare and Ecocritical Theory.

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 7, 2016 at 10:28:12 AM EDT

Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and Ecofeminism

 

http://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/2016/06/07/shakespeare-and-contemporary-theory-25-shakespeare-and-ecofeminist-theory-with-rebecca-laroche-and-jennifer-munroe/

 

Neema interviews Rebecca Laroche and Jennifer Munroe about their forthcoming book Shakespeare and Ecofeminist Theory for the Arden Shakespeare and Theory series. Links for the Early Modern Recipes Online Collective and the Recipes Project can be found below, as well as a recipe for “Candy Angelica”.

 

EMROC (Early Modern Recipes Online Collective): http://emroc.hypotheses.org/

 

Recipes Project: http://recipes.hypotheses.org/

 

“To Candy Angelica” (from “Cookbook of Mary Cruso and Timothy Cruso,” c.1689, Folger MS x.d.24)

 

Take it in April, when tis young, cut it in lengths ___ nail long, lay it in water a day & Night, then boil it tender, shift it once in a boiling; then take it up & strain it, then put it In your preserving pan with a little sugar, & as much water as will cover it, set it on a slow fire, & it will turn green; then take it out & drayne it; to a pound of Angelica take a pound of double refined sugar; then take half the sugar, and a little water, and preserve it in it; let it lie in that syrup a week; drayne it from the syrup, put the other half pound to candy, then put your Angelica to it; let it boil a little till it is candyed, then lay it out upon your sieve to dry.

 

 

 

British Shakespeare Association – Hull 2016

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.210  Tuesday, 7 June 2016

 

From:        BSA <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 1, 2016 at 11:43:50 AM EDT

Subject:    British Shakespeare Association – Hull 2016

 

Registration for Hull 2016

 

The BSA’s 2016 conference, ‘Shakespearean Transformations: Death, Life, and Afterlives’, takes place 8-11 September 2016 at the University of Hull. Registration for the conference is now open. The early bird rate (before 1 July) is £180/£90 concession, and the conference dinner at The Deep aquarium will cost £40. All participants must be members of the BSA in good standing. 15 bursaries for postgraduate students will also be available, and details will be posted on the conference website shortly. Please visit the conference website for full details.

 

 

 

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