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Folger Symposium Announcement: Shakespeare's Language

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.475  Wednesday, 3 December 2014

 

From:        Elyse Martin < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         December 2, 2014 at 5:08:11 PM EST

Subject:    Folger Symposium Announcement: Shakespeare's Language

 

The Folger Institute is pleased to announce that applications are now open for its spring symposium, “Shakespeare’s Language,” organized by Lynne Magnusson. 

 

Funding is available to qualified graduate students and faculty from the Folger Institute consortium. If you would like to apply for admission without funding, you are more than welcome to do so.

 

I would be happy to answer any questions you or your colleagues may have.

 

Best wishes,

Elyse Martin

Program Assistant 

Folger Institute 

(202) 675-0333

 

 

Shakespeare’s Language

Lynne Magnusson 

Spring Symposium


Schedule

 

If the Muses themselves spoke English, they would speak with “Shakespeare’s fine-filed phrase,” Francis Meres commented in 1598, suggesting that Shakespeare’s linguistic art tapped the emerging potential of the English language and extended its resources. Sponsored by the Folger Institute Center for Shakespeare Studies as part of its triennial anniversary programming, this symposium will gather several dozen scholars with relevant research and teaching interests to explore Shakespeare’s still resonant language. With the help of invited session leaders, participants will consider reinvigorated contexts and new tools for its illumination and assessment. Four hundred years on, linguistic change is itself an important context, and the symposium will address not only variation in early modern English but also the effects of subsequent language change, changing perceptions of English, and translation on Shakespeare’s verbal art and its reception. Revisiting Renaissance education in the arts of language, symposium participants will ask how new perspectives on the everyday theatricality of the Latin schoolroom or its grammatical and rhetorical culture might inflect understanding of Shakespeare’s language. Turning to current-day tools, the symposium will look at how discourse analysis has developed beyond speech-act theory, whether reading Shakespeare’s performative utterance as passionate action, cognitive processing, or dialogic negotiation. With computer-assisted analysis of texts and large corpora rapidly transforming language study, the symposium will also create opportunities to try out some relevant tools for digital text-analysis.

 

Organizer: Lynne Magnusson is Professor of English at the University of Toronto. She is currently working on a book on  The Transformation of the English Letter, 1500-1620, a second book on ways to rethink Shakespeare’s language historically, and an edition of Shakespeare’s Sonnets

 

Speakers: Sylvia Adamson (The University of Sheffield), Amy Cook (Stony Brook University), Hugh Craig (The University of Newcastle, Australia), Mary Crane (Boston College), Jeff Dolven (Princeton University), Lynn Enterline (Vanderbilt University), Brett Hirsch (The University of Western Australia), Jonathan Hope (University of Strathclyde), Alysia Kolentsis (St. Jerome’s University and the University of Waterloo), Jenny C. Mann (Cornell University), Russ McDonald (University of London), Martin Mueller (Northwestern University), Terttu Nevalainen (University of Helsinki), David Schalkwyk (Queen Mary, University of London, and University of Warwick), Daniel A. Shore (Georgetown University), Stefan Sinclair (McGill University), Michael Witmore (Folger Shakespeare Library)

 

Apply: 12 January 2015 for admission and grants-in-aid. Application form here

 
 
[EMLS] New Issue Published

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.472  Tuesday, 2 December 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         December 1, 2014 at 12:45:40 PM EST

Subject:    [EMLS] New Issue Published

 

Early Modern Literary Studies has just published its latest issue, which is freely available at https://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/journal/index.php/emls

 

We invite you to review the Table of Contents here and then visit our web site to review articles and items of interest.

 

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

 

Dr Daniel Cadman (on behalf of the editorial team)

Sheffield Hallam University

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Early Modern Literary Studies

Vol 17, No 2 (2014)

Table of Contents

https://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/journal/index.php/emls/issue/view/9

 

Articles

--------

Take Up the Body: Early Modern English Translations of Seneca's Corpses

   Nicola Imbracsio

 

Laughter in Twelfth Night  and Beyond: Affect and Genre in Early Modern Comedy

   Sabina Zhomartovna Amanbayeva

 

A Performance History of The Witch of Edmonton 

   Rowland Wymer

 

‘Hide, and be Hidden, Ride and be Ridden’: The Coach as Transgressive Space in the Literature of Early Modern London

   Alan James Hogarth

 

Developments and Debates in English Censorship during the Interregnum

   Benjamin Woodford

 

 

Review Essays

--------

Calvin Huckaby and David V. Urban, comps, John Milton: An Annotated Bibliography, 1989-1999 , ed. by David V. Urban and Paul Klemp (Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 2011)

   Emily Speller

 

'What was it Shakespeare said?': Peter Holland and Adrian Poole, eds,  Great Shakespeareans , set III, vols X-XIII (London: Continuum, 2012)

   Patrick Murray

 

 

Book Reviews

--------

Naomi Miller and Naomi Yavneh, eds,  Gender and Early Modern Constructions of Childhood  (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011)

   Jamie Jones

 

Helen Smith and Louise Wilson, eds,  Renaissance Paratexts  (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011)

   Tom Lockwood

 

Jennifer Vaught, Carnival and Literature in Early Modern England  (Farnham: Ashgate, 2012)

   Stuart Farley

 

Lukas Erne,  Shakespeare and the Book Trade  (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013)

   Tom Rooney

 

Mary Ann Lund, Melancholy, Medicine, and Religion in Early Modern England: Reading ‘The Anatomy of Melancholy’  (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010)

   Joesph Sterrett

 

 

Theatre Reviews

--------

The Maid's Tragedy, Epicene, and As You Like It, presented by the American Shakespeare Center at the Blackfriars Playhouse, Staunton, Virginia, 3 January-5 April, 2014

   Kevin Donovan

 

Twelfth Night, Or What You Will presented at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, 24 May 2014.

   Edel Semple

 

 

Books received

--------

Books Received

   Andrew Duxfield

 

________________________________________________________________________

Early Modern Literary Studies

http://purl.org/emls

 
 
Book Announcements: To Take Upon Us the Mystery of Things

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.466  Monday, 1 December 2014

 

From:        Ira Zinlaw < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 28, 2014 at 2:12:39 PM EST

Subject:    Book Announcements: To Take Upon Us the Mystery of Things

 

This is to announce a book just published in October 2014.

 

Title: To Take Upon Us The Mystery of Things: The Shakespeare Lectures of Martin Lings

 

Author/Editor:  Ira B. Zinman

 

Link to Publisher: Matheson Trust Publications, UK

 

http://themathesontrust.org/library/to-take-upon-us

Link to Seller USA: http://www.amazon.com/Take-Mystery-Things-Words-Wisdom/dp/1908092106/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1417201834&sr=1-2&keywords=ira+zinman 

 
 
Globe Online

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.465  Monday, 1 December 2014

 

[1] From:        Hardy Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         November 14, 2014 at 10:08:29 AM EST

     Subject:    Globe Online 

 

[2] From:        Kirk McElhearn < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         November 4, 2014 at 10:21:00 AM EST

     Subject:    Shakespeare's Globe Theatre Launches Web Site to Stream and Sell Films of Their Performances

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hardy Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 14, 2014 at 10:08:29 AM EST

Subject:    Globe Online

 

This month Shakespeare’s Globe launched Globe Player 

 

globeplayer.tv features over 50 full-length Shakespeare productions filmed at the Globe in HD, including many foreign language productions from the 2012 Globe to Globe festival. The Globe is the first theatre in the world to offer its own video on demand platform.
 

 

Globe productions on offer include Twelfth Night featuring Mark Rylance and Stephen Fry, Henry V with Jamie Parker and The Taming of the Shrew with Samantha Spiro. A resource from Muse of Fire the Film features free interviews about Shakespeare with actors including Ewan McGregor, Sir Ian McKellen and Dame Judi Dench.

Prices start from £2.99 to rent and £4.99 to buy. 

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Kirk McElhearn < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 4, 2014 at 10:21:00 AM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare's Globe Theatre Launches Web Site to Stream and Sell Films of Their Performances

 

http://www.mcelhearn.com/shakespeares-globe-theatre-launches-web-site-to-stream-and-sell-films-of-their-performances/

 

Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre Launches Web Site to Stream and Sell Films of Their Performances

 

Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, which is a reproduction of the original Globe Theatre in London, has been performing plays by Shakespeare and other playwrights of his time since 1997. In recent year, they began filming the plays, and have released a number of DVDs and Blu-Rays of their productions. (I reviewed their Twelfth Night.)

 

Today, Shakespeare’s Globe has launched the Globe Player website which brings these films closer to users around the world, offering streaming and sales of many of their productions. At a cost of £4 for rentals (which let you watch the play for 7 days) and £8 for purchases (also available for download for 7 days; make sure to back up your files), this is a fairly-priced offering, but in terms of content, there’s not a lot available, as of yet. Only 15 Shakespeare plays are available on the site, along with one play by Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus.

In addition, the theater offers content from their Globe to Globe series, in which Shakespeare’s plays are performed in languages other than English, by companies from around the world. These films are available for rental for £3, and for sale for only £5. This will certainly attract a global audience, but there are no more than one or two plays in any language.

 

I have several of these films on DVD already, and, when I went to the site to buy one to try it out, I was disappointed. There are a number of comedies and history plays, but only one tragedy, Romeo and Juliet. There is no Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, Julius Caesar or any of the other well-known titles. It’s not so much that they’re reserving these titles for sale on DVD and Blu-Ray, but they simply haven’t filmed any of them yet, with the exception of Macbeth, in the 2013 season. The other recently filmed plays that are not on the site, also from last year’s season, are The Tempest and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. I assume they’ll offer those titles online after they’ve exhausted hard-copy sales.

 

[ . . . ]

 

 
Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Imprints of Performance

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.460  Wednesday, 26 November 2014

 

From:        Gavin Paul < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:        November 26, 2014 at 12:37:42 AM EST

Subject:    Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Imprints of Performance

 

Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Imprints of Performance.

J. Gavin Paul

 

Palgrave Macmillan, 2014

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/shakespeare-and-the-imprints-of-performance-j-gavin-paul/?K=9781137438430

 

Gavin Paul

Arts One Interdisciplinary Program

University of British Columbia

 
 
NEH Summer Workshops

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.459  Wednesday, 26 November 2014

 

[1] From:        Lee Aylward < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         November 20, 2014 at 2:48:54 PM EST

     Subject:    NEH Summer 2015 workshop for teachers

 

[2] From:        Megan Estes < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:        November 24, 2014 at 2:42:16 PM EST

     Subject:    NEH Seminar offered at Amherst College Summer 2015 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Lee Aylward < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 20, 2014 at 2:48:54 PM EST

Subject:    NEH Summer 2015 workshop for teachers 

 

Good News!  The National Endowment for the Humanities, through its Landmarks in American History and Culture Program, will support two week-long workshops celebrating the heritage of the Mississippi Delta.  The Most Southern Place on Earth:  Music, Culture and History in the Mississippi Delta will explore the region’s impact on America’s music, foodways, civil rights, literary heritage, and political landscape.  Workshops will be offered to thirty seven participants each between June 21-17 and July 12-18, 2015.  They are open to K-12 teachers, including public, private, and home school, and librarians.  Five graduate credit hours may be earned.  This will be the sixth year of NEH support for this exciting workshop.

Stipends of $1200 are available.  Complete information and application materials are available from the Delta Center for Culture and Learning at http://deltacenterforcultureandlearning.com/southern-place-workshop/   and additional information is provided by NEH at http://www.neh.gov/projects/landmarks-schools.html.  The Directors of the workshop are Dr. Luther Brown ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and Lee Aylward ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .) A special participant will be Dr. Rolando Herts ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ,) the new Director of the Delta Center for Culture and Learning.

 

Lee Brigham Aylward

Program Associate for Education and Community Outreach

Delta State University

Delta Center for Culture and Learning

Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area

DSU Box 3152

Cleveland, MS 38733

Office:  662-846-4310

Cell:  662-721-7591

Fax:  662-846-4701

www.deltacenterforcultureandlearning.com

https://www.facebook.com/#!/TheDeltaCenter

www.msdeltaheritage.com  

https://www.facebook.com/MDNHA

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Megan Estes < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:        November 24, 2014 at 2:42:16 PM EST

Subject:    NEH Seminar offered at Amherst College Summer 2015

 

SUMMER SEMINAR ON PUNISHMENT, POLITICS, AND CULTURE

 

Amherst College will host a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for K-12 teachers and current full time graduate students who intend to pursue a career in K-12 teaching, from June 28-July 31, 2015.  The seminar will be directed by Austin Sarat of the Departments of Political Science and Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought.  It will examine three questionsWhat is punishment and why do we punish as we do?   What can we learn about politics, law, and culture in the United States from an examination of our practices of punishment?  What are the appropriate limits of punishment?  The application deadline is March 2, 2015.  Information is available at http://www.amherst.edu/go/neh.  If you have any questions regarding the seminar or the application process, contact Megan Estes at (413)542-2380 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

*Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.*

 

Megan L. Estes Ryan

Academic Coordinator

Law, Jurisprudence & Social Thought

Amherst College

PO Box 5000

Amherst, MA   01002

413-542-2380

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  

 
 
Shakespeare in Venice Summer School: The Shylock Project

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.458  Wednesday, 26 November 2014

 

From:        Maria Ida Biggi < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 19, 2014 at 10:42:12 AM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare in Venice Summer School: The Shylock Project

 

Fondazione Giorgio Cini - Università Ca'Foscari Venezia

 

Shakespeare in Venice Summer School

Giorgio Cini Foundation, Venice

15 June - 11 July 2015

 

"The Shylock Project" 

 

An intensive four-week course of study exploring the text and contexts of Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. A rich program of lectures and creative workshops by leading scholars, actors, and musicians held in the beautiful San Giorgio monastery will be complemented by theatre performances and excursions to the Jewish Ghetto and other Venetian sites. A unique full-immersion experience aimed at creating the first historical production of the play in the Ghetto of Venice in the year of its quincentennial (1516-2016).

 

Bill Alexander, Shaul Bassi, László Benke, Maria Ida Biggi, Jerry Brotton, Donatella Calabi, Dario Calimani, Thomas Cartelli, Kent Cartwright, Matthew Chiorini, Monica Chojnacka, Roberta Cimarosti, Fernando Cioni, Karin Coonrod, Eugenio de'Giorgi, Valerio de Scarpis, Péter Dávidházi, Tobias Döring, Paul Edmondson, Keir Elam, Tibor Fabiny, Stephen Greenblatt, Galit Hasan-Rokem, Loretta Innocenti, Géza Kállay, M. Lindsay Kaplan, David Scott Kastan, Simon Levis Sullam, Jacques Lezra, Piergabriele Mancuso, Stephen Orgel, Avraham Oz, Natália Pikli, Loredana Polezzi, Freddie Rokem, Carol Chillington Rutter, David Schalkwyk, Alessandro Serpieri, James Shapiro, Michael Shapiro, Stuart Sillars, B.J. Sokol, Boika Sokolova, Werner Sollors, Ramie Targoff, Laura Tosi, Stanley Wells, Suzanne Wofford.

 

The Summer School welcomes international graduate students, faculty members, teachers, and independent scholars.

 

Information: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it   

 

Application deadline: 15 February 2015

 
 
Actors From The London Stage

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.457  Wednesday, 26 November 2014

 

From:        Actors From The London Stage < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 3, 2014 at 7:35:33 AM EDT

Subject:    Actors From The London Stage

 

Bring Actors From The London Stage to your Campus

Booking Window NOW OPEN for Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 Tours

 

Five professional British actors
Five days of workshops and performances
One week of Shakespeare your students will never forget

 

Now Booking for Fall 2015 and Spring 2016

 

Now in its 40th year, Actors From The London Stage continues to inspire students with the power of Shakespeare. An AFTLS residency brings the Bard to life on the stage and in the classroom. Our British cast—veterans of some of the most respected theatre companies in the world—will tour campuses across the United States with their innovative five-hand staging of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Residencies are available in Oct/Nov of 2015 and Jan/Feb/Mar of 2016.

 

Availability is limited; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it to request dates, rates, and details.

 

See AFTLS in action and flip through our brochure at the AFTLS WEBSITE.

 

Founded in 1975 by Homer “Murph” Swander and world-renowned actor Sir Patrick Stewart, AFTLS is an actor-driven tour de force. Our actors hail from such prestigious companies as Shakespeare’s Globe, the National Theatre of Great Britain, and the Royal Shakespeare Company. Uniquely, AFTLS actors not only perform a full-length Shakespearean play, but also visit dozens of classrooms during their weeklong residency.

 

In addition to enlivening theatre and English departments, the AFTLS experience can be tailored to enrich coursework across the academic spectrum. Our dynamic, hands-on approach will heighten each student's intellectual curiosity regardless of discipline. Whether coaching accounting students on successful presentation skills, or instructing law students in the art of persuasion, these workshops promote a campus-wide dialogue inspired by the works of William Shakespeare.

 
 
City of Łódź Commemorates Ira Aldridge with a Plaque

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.451  Monday, 24 November 2014

 

From:        Krystyna Kujawinska-Courtney < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 16, 2014 at 5:26:26 PM EST

Subject:    City of Łódź Commemorates Ira Aldridge with a Plaque

 

On November 10, a plaque was unveiled commemorating the connections of Ira Aldridge (1807-1867), first black Shakespearian tragedian with the city of Łódź. The ceremony was attended by numerous representatives of the Łódź world of politics, culture and science. The plaque was placed on the front of the house located at Piotrkowska Street no. 175, the former hotel and Paradyz theatre,  where the actor died unexpectedly during the rehearsal of Shakespeare’s Othello, on August 7, 1867. He was buried in the Lutheran cemetery (Cmentarz Ewangelicko-Augsburski) at Ogrodowa Street. 

 

Ira Aldridge was born in New York, in 1807. In 1825 he emigrated to Great Britain, where he performed in the London theatres as well as in the provincial venues. He began his European tours in 1852. Not only did he play the roles of black Shakespearian protagonists as Othello and Aaron, but also white-face characters, for instance Macbeth, Richard III, King Lear or Shylock. And it was precisely these performances in countries throughout Europe (i.e. Belgium, Germany, Sweden, Russia, the Czech Republic, France, Turkey, Ukraine, Denmark, Hungary, the Netherlands, Serbia and Poland, I give here the current names of these countries) that brought him international fame and recognition. Among other things, Aldridge introduced Shakespeare to Serbian culture. In 1858 he was cast as Richard III, Othello and Macbeth in Novi Sad, the centre of Vojvodina, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. His visit accelerated, as some specialists maintain, the construction of the National Theatre in Belgrade. In 1858, when he acted as Richard III in Kraków, Polish audience had the first opportunity to see that play in the theatre. His interpretation of the tragedy of Othello in Polish theatres, which he visited seven times, contributed to the emergence of the first Polish translation of the play. It was first staged in Warsaw, in 1862, with Aldridge in the title role. He was also the first actor to present the Shakespeare repertoire before the audience of a theatre in Constantinople (1866).

 

During his tours Aldridge performed in big metropolitan cities and in small towns, wherever the theatres had enough room and the right conditions to accommodate the crowds that wanted to see him. And he was successful everywhere he went. In recognition of his achievements, Aldridge received many national honours and awards. For example, the king of Prussia bestowed on him the Gold Medal of the First Class for Arts and Science – besides Aldridge the recipients included only baron Von Humboldt, German philosopher and scientist, Luigi Gasparo Sponti, Italian composer and Franz Liszt, Hungarian pianist and composer. In Austria, he received the Grand Cross of the Order of Leopold; in Switzerland, he was given the White Cross of Merit. He was made a honorary member of many scientific and cultural organizations, among them The Imperial and Arch-ducal Institution of ‘Our Lady of the Manger’ in Pest (Hungary), The Royal Czech Conservatory in Prague, Imperial Academy of Arts in St. Petersburg (Russia).  He was also given the title of the Honorary Commission of Captain in the Republican Army of Haiti for the promotion of skills and talent of his race. 

 

The theatre records and criticism, which recognized and appreciated Aldridge’s professional achievements in his lifetime, mainly come from the European countries visited by him during his performances. Gazeta Wielkiego Xiestwa Poznańskiego  of January 23, 1853 called him the ‘first magnitude star’. He was, in the opinion of the reporter for the Kurier Warszawski newspaper, “greeted by a crowded houses everywhere, and princes and [ordinary] people were eager to see him, while honours, orders and medals were showered upon him.” Richard Wagner (1813-1883) observed that during his performances Aldridge would stir uncontrollable enthusiasm, Theophile Gautier (1811-1872) described his unmatched success in his popular Voyage en Russie published in 1896, and Taras Shevchenko drew Aldridge’s  portrait as a token of their friendship.

 

The list of those who knew and remembered Aldridge, often enthusiastically, includes not only his colleagues and professional acquaintances such as Ellen Tree, Edmund Keene, Charles Keene, J. Philip Kemble, Madge Kendall. Among people, who stayed in touch with him and took a special interest in following his career were also representatives of the literary and artistic world; among them Sir Walter Scott (1771-1831), Tyrone Powers (1791-1841), Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton (1803-1837), Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), baron von Humboldt (1779-1859),  Franz Liszt (1811-1886), Charles Dickens (1812-1870), Jenny Lind (1820-1887) and Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910). 

 

The Aldridge family memorabilia include a number of photo albums filled with pictures sent to him after his visits to Russia, Mongolia and the Ukraine with expressions of gratitude for his acting. Students at Kazan University bestowed upon him a special document written in Latin bearing an enormous wax seal and ribbons, in which they expressed their gratitude for his performance. In St. Petersburg, the enthusiastic audience unharnessed the horses after his performance and dragged the carriage to the hotel. 

 

The connection between Lódź and this great Shakespeare artist was mainly limited to registering his death and funeral that lasted over ten hours. The Lodzer Zeitung (August 10, 1867) reporter wrote that the city authorities of that time rose to the occasion, generously providing financial resources for its organization. A few hours before the funeral service, countless crowds of local residents were already gathered in front of the theatre. The funeral procession was led by a pastor and a parish cantor of St. Matthew’s. The cantor’s responsibilities included the coordination of singing and the supervision of the appropriate ranking of school youth that belonged to a Musical Society of the local Lutheran parish. Young people sang songs, selected especially for the occasion. They were assisted by joined choirs and singing ensembles from the entire city, among them those that worked at Łódź factories.The orchestra of the Russian dragoon regimen that accompanied the singing, marched right behind them. Members of the Rife Society and  the Theatrical Society proceeded with dignity behind the orchestra, carrying the red and velvet cushions, which held state awards conferred on Aldridge during his lifetime, as well as a huge laurel wreath. 

 

The hearse on which the corpse was placed was pulled by four horses covered with a pall. Members of the Rife Society dressed in ceremonial attire, with rifles on their shoulders and their banner, formed a natural protection for the hearse. As the first of the mourners, right behind the hearse, walked “in a deep regret August Hentschel, the theatre owner, who was accompanied by the Mayor, [. . .] and another person,” the latter being, unfortunately, unidentified. Next, twelve Łódź guilds paid their last respects to Aldridge. Their decorative banners  were carried by respective delegations. In that order, right behind them, was the closed carriage, in which the bereaved widow was riding. Behind the carriage proceeded others. There were so many of them that the reporter was unable to specify the names of their owners. At the end of the funeral procession were countless crowds of Łódź residents.

 

To the sound of the music, singing and chiming of the church bells, the whole intricately organized funeral procession marched slowly along Piotrkowska Street, the main street of the town, towards the cemetery. Since there was no time to prepare a suitable place at the cemetery, manufacturer Charles Frederick Moes, himself of German origin, agreed to place Aldridge’s body in his newly erected tomb. Over Aldridge’s grave, the pastor delivered a speech, in which he paid his respects to the deceased, emphasizing the tragedian’s virtues and devotion to God. He drew attention of those present to “the fragility of human life and fate, which often casts people far away from their place of birth, where they have to rest for ever, away from the loved ones and friends.” Then the singers took up a dirge, and the pastor consecrated the corpse. A laurel wreath was mounted on the coffin and it was laid in the tomb; the sounds of trumpets could be heard, played by almost all professional and amateur trumpeters of the town. The tomb was showered with flowers and wreaths. 

 

Thus, in 1867, according to the Warsaw reporter, our multicultural and multireligious Łódź paid her last respects to the great artist, taking on the responsibility of caring for his grave. The tomb was recently restored in 2001 – the money was collected at the Łódź cemetery during All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day – and it had always remained under the special protection of the inhabitants of the city. Attempting to honour the memory of this great artist, over the past few years American schools, theatres, and Aldridge’s devotees have been  appealing to the current authorities of Łódź, initially to place his name on the Walk of Fame in Piotrkowska Street,  however, this turned out to be impossible due to formal reasons. Since 2010, I have corresponded with Ms. Barbara Johnson Williams, from Memphis, conducting on her behalf the negotiations with the Museum of Cinematography, which, with time, agreed to help with posting the commemorative plate (Ms. Williams visited our town four times during this process). And so, as of October 10, 2014 we have a plaque, designed by Professor Marian Konieczny, a famous Polish artist, which reminds the residents of Łódź not only about this prominent actor, but also about the location of the first stationary theatre in the city. The speakers at the ceremony of the unveiling of the plaque, led by Ms. Elżbieta Czarnecka, curator of the Museum of Cinematography, included Ms. Barbara Johnson Williams, Mr. Mieczyslaw Kuźmicki, director of the Museum of Cinematography, Senator Ryszard Bonisławski, Professor Zofia Wysokińska, Pro-Rector of UŁ International Cooperation as well as myself. The laudatory speech of Professor Anna Kuligowska-Korzeniowska was read by Łódź actors: Jarosław Wójcik and Gracjan Kielanowski. The spectators, who gathered, listened to selected jazz standards performed by alumni of Wyższa Szkoła Muzyczna (Higher School of Music) from the class of Professor Jacek Deląg. I wholeheartedly invite you to watch the recordings of the event on YOUTUBE  http://youtu.be/jqv-VAmMX9g, made by Professor Sławomir Kalwinek of the National Higher School of Film, Television and Theatre in Łódź.

 
 
Book Announcement: Juliet's Nurse: Talk/Book Announcement

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.449  Monday, 24 November 2014

 

From:        Lois Leveen < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 18, 2014 at 10:07:00 PM EDT

Subject:    Book Announcement: Juliet's Nurse:  Talk/Book Announcement

 

Dear colleagues,

 

I’m delighted to announce that Juliet’s Nurse has just been published by Simon & Schuster in the US, UK, and Australia, and by Random House in Canada.  The novel begins14 years before the events in Romeo and Juliet, and, as the title suggests, it is told from the point-of-view of Shakespeare’s memorably comic/tragic Angelica.  With the 3rd largest number of lines in the play, she was clearly always wanting to tell her own story.

 

The Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto is hosting a talk this Friday, October 24 at 2pm in which I will discuss the academic research that is woven into the novel, particularly focusing on how I use fiction to present information about premodern maternal and religious desire for audiences beyond academia.  If you have ever wondered about creative ways to share scholarship with broader audiences, this talk (a reprise of one I delivered in at the Medievalist Congress in Kalamazoo) is for you.  I would be happy to deliver it at other campuses or events, or to give talks about other aspects of revising Shakespeare for modern readers—please feel free to contact me off list about hosting future events.  Details about the U of T event, which is free and open to the public, are available here:  http://medieval.utoronto.ca/2014/10/juliets-nurse-talk-by-lois-leveen/  (yes, the Canadian cover image is completely anachronistic; the US/UK cover is slightly better but only slightly . . . I assure you, the novel, like the play, is set in the 14th century)

 

There is also a very wonderful teaching guide for pairing Juliet’s Nurse with Romeo and Juliet, created by Pam Cole of Kennesaw State University.  The guide includes sections focusing on literary concepts such as genre, point-of-view, irony, etc. and also on interdisciplinary approaches drawing on history, science, fine arts, etc.  It’s adaptable for use at both the high school and undergraduate levels and can be downloaded for free at http://loisleveen.com/index.php/loisleveen/juliets-nurse-for-teachers  

 

Thanks to SHAKSPER colleagues who helped in research along the way.

 

Best regards,

Lois Leveen

Portland, Oregon

 
 
Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Ethics of Appropriation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.448  Monday, 24 November 2014

 

From:        Alexa Huang < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 22, 2014 at 9:17:20 AM EST

Subject:    Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Ethics of Appropriation

 

Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Ethics of Appropriation 

 

Edited by Alexa Huang and Elizabeth Rivlin

Palgrave Macmillan, 2014

 

At a time when Shakespeare is becoming increasingly globalized and diversified it is urgent more than ever to ask how this appropriated ‘Shakespeare’ constructs ethical value across cultural and other fault lines.

 

Available in e-book (PDF) and hardback formats

 

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/shakespeare-and-the-ethics-of-appropriation-alexa-huang/?K=9781137375766

 

Table of Contents

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/toc/1137375760/ref=dp_toc/278-1375004-4746421?ie=UTF8&n=266239

 

Introduction; Alexa Huang and Elizabeth Rivlin

 

1. Shakespearean Rhizomatics: Adaptation, Ethics, Value; Doug Lanier

2. Recognizing Shakespeare, Rethinking Fidelity: A Rhetoric and Ethics of Appropriation; Christy Desmet 

3. Ethics and the Undead: Reading Shakespearean (Mis)appropriation in Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula; Adrian Streete

4. Adaptation Revoked: Knowledge, Ethics, and Trauma in Jane Smiley's A Thousand Acres; Elizabeth Rivlin

5. Double Jeopardy: Shakespeare and Prison Theater; Courtney Lehmann

6. Theatre Director as Unelected Representative: Sulayman Al-Bassam's Arab Shakespeare Trilogy; Margaret Litvin

7. A "whirl of aesthetic terminology": Swinburne, Shakespeare, and Ethical Criticism; Robert Sawyer

8. "Raw-Savage" Othello: The First Staged Japanese Adaptation of Othello (1903) and Japanese Colonialism; Yukari Yoshihara

9. The Bard in Bollywood: The Fraternal Nation and Shakespearean Adaptation in Hindi Cinema; Gitanjali Shahani and Brinda Charry

10. Multilingual Ethics in Henry V and Henry VIII; Ema Vyroubalová

11. In Other Words: Global Shakespearean Transformations; Sheila T. Cavanagh

 

Afterword: "State of Exception": Forgetting Hamlet; Thomas Cartelli

 

Appendix: For the Record: Interview with Sulayman Al-Bassam; Margaret Litvin 

 
 
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