Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home ::
Announcements
Recent Additions to Lexicons of Early Modern English

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.346  Tuesday, 19 August 2014

 

From:        UTP Journals < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 18, 2014 at 10:48:39 AM EDT

Subject:    Recent Additions to Lexicons of Early Modern English

 

Recently added to Lexicons of Early Modern English

http://bit.ly/_leme

 

§  Stephen Batman, "A note of Saxon wordes" (1581)

§  Edmund Bohun, Geographical Dictionary (1693): 11,681 word-entries

§  Richard Boothby, A Brief Discovery or Description of the Most Famous Island of Madagascar (1646)

§  Thomas Dekker, O per se O (1612)

§  John Heydon, "A Chymical Dictionary" (English; 1662): 70 word-entries.

§  Gregory Martin, The New Testament of the English College of Rheims (1582)

§  Gerhard Mercator, Historia Mundi Or Mercator's Atlas (1635)

§  Guy Miège, A New Dictionary French and English, with another English and French (1677): 18,376 word-entries, 73,641 sub-entries

§  John Ogilby, Asia, the First Part (1673)

§  John Rider,  Bibliotheca Scholastica (English-Latin, 1589): 42,000 word-entries and sub-entries.

§  Richard Rowlands,  A Restitution of Decayed Intelligence in Antiquities (1605; Richard Verstegan; text replaced by an extended and analyzed version)

§  Nicholas Stone, Enchiridion of Fortification (1645)

§  John Thorie, The Theatre of the Earth (1601; place-names): 3,100 word-entries.

§  John Turner, A Book of Wines (1568)

 

Coming soon to LEME 

§  Ortus Vocabulorum (Latin-English, 1500): 25,500 word-entries.

§  Henry Hexham, A Copious English and Netherdutch Dictionary (1647): 33,000 word-entries.

 

Lexicons of Early Modern English is a growing historical database offering scholars unprecedented access to early books and manuscripts documenting the growth and development of the English language. With more than 600,000 word-entries from 184 monolingual, bilingual, and polyglot dictionaries, glossaries, and linguistic treatises, encyclopedic and other lexical works from the beginning of printing in England to 1702, as well as tools updated annually, LEME sets the standard for modern linguistic research on the English language. 

 

Use Modern Techniques to Research Early Modern English!

199 Searchable lexicons

148 Fully analyzed lexicons

664 546 Total word entries

444 971 Fully analyzed word entries

573 423 Total analyzed forms and subforms

444 972 Total analyzed forms

128 451 Total analyzed subforms

60 891 Total English modern headwords

 

LEME provides exciting opportunities for research for historians of the English language. More than a half-million word-entries devised by contemporary speakers of early modern English describe the meaning of words, and their equivalents in languages such as French, Italian, Spanish, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and other tongues encountered then in Europe, America, and Asia.

 

University of Toronto Press Journals

5201 Dufferin St., Toronto, ON, Canada M3H 5T8

Tel: (416) 667-7810 Fax: (416) 667-7881

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

www.utpjournals.com/leme

http://leme.library.utoronto.ca/

 
 
Shakespeare and the Visual Arts - Call for Papers - New Deadline

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.344  Monday, 11 August 2014

 

From:         Michele Marrapodi < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 10, 2014 at 6:02:11 PM EDT

Subject:     Shakespeare and the Visual Arts - Call for Papers - New Deadline

 

Call for Papers - New deadline

 

SHAKESPEARE AND THE VISUAL ARTS:

The Italian Influence

 

Edited by

Michele Marrapodi and Keir Elam

 

Critical investigation into the rubric of “Shakespeare and the visual arts” has generally focused on the influence exerted by the works of Shakespeare on a number of artists, painters, and sculptors in the course of the centuries. Drawing on the poetics of intertextuality, and profiting from the more recent concepts of cultural mobility and permeability between cultures in the early modern period, this volume will study instead the use or mention of Renaissance material arts and artists in Shakespeare’s oeuvre. Among the great variety of possible topics, contributors may like to consider:

 

- the impact of optics and pictorial perspective on the plays or poems;

- anamorphosis and trompe l’oeil effects on the whole range of visual representation;  

- the rhetoric of “verbal painting” in dramatic and poetic discourse; 

- the actual citation of classical and Renaissance artists;

- the legacy of iconographic topoi;

- the humanistic debate or Paragone of the Sister Arts;

- the use of emblems and emblematic language; 

- explicit and implicit ekphrasis and ekphrastic passages in the plays or poems;

- ekphrastic intertextuality, etc.

 

Contributors are invited to submit proposals by 30 September 2014 to the addresses of the editors below. They should send a one-page abstract of their proposed chapter on the relationship between the age of Shakespeare and Renaissance visual culture, including theoretical approaches to the arts in the drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Each abstract (approx. 300 words) should include the author’s name, email, affiliation, and title of the proposed contribution.

 

Prof. Michele Marrapodi

University of Palermo, Italy.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Prof. Keir Elam

University of Bologna, Italy.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
Folger Digital Editions: The Poems

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.341  Sunday, 10 August 2014

 

From:         Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 8, 2014 at 10:07:43 AM EDT

Subject:     Folger Digital Editions: The Poems

 

The Folger Digital Texts now has Shakespeare's Sonnets, Venus and Adonis, Lucrece, and The Phoenix and the Turtle

 

http://www.folgerdigitaltexts.org/?chapter=4

 
ISC 2014

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.336  Tuesday, 29 July 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Subject:    ISC

 

Dear Subscriber,

 

I leave tomorrow for London, Stratford, and then back to London.

 

This is my ISC and theater trip.

 

I will be able to edit submissions tomorrow, but then there will be an interruption for a few days until I get over jet jag and settled into the too aggressive itinerary I have set for myself.

 

Hardy

 

 
Shakespeare Magazine - New Issue

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.330  Monday, 28 July 2014

 

From:        Pat Reid < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 22, 2014 at 8:29:53 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare Magazine - New Issue

 

I wanted to let you know that the third issue of Shakespeare Magazine is now available to read online:

 

http://issuu.com/shakespearemagazine/docs/shakespeare_magazine_03

 

Highlights include The Shakespeare Guide to Brazil, Shakespeare's Cleopatra on screen, Henry IV in Washington DC and an exhibition of beautiful French Shakespeare costumes. 

 

I very much hope you enjoy the issue, and please feel free to share with anyone you feel may be interested.

 

All best wishes,

Pat Reid - Editor, Shakespeare Magazine

 

NB Shakespeare Magazine is a completely free online magazine. You don’t have to ‘Follow’ or sign up - just click or swipe to start turning the pages. 

 

Website: http://www.shakespearemagazine.com

 

Previous issues: 

 

http://issuu.com/shakespearemagazine/docs/shakespeare_magazine_01

 

http://issuu.com/shakespearemagazine/docs/shakespeare_magazine_02

 

Twitter: @UKShakespeare

 
 
Shakespeare-Themed Book Reviews and Course Adoptions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.329  Monday, 28 July 2014

 

From:        Lois Leveen < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 17, 2014 at 5:45:51 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare-Themed Book Reviews and Course Adoptions

 

Colleagues,

 

As some of you know, JULIET’S NURSE is being published by Simon & Schuster this September. It imagines the 14 years leading up to the events in Romeo and Juliet, as told from the pov of the nurse. There is much Shakespeare but also much medieval/Renaissance Italian history woven in, and I’m honored to say the audiences who’ve heard scenes from it (at Shakespeare 450 in Paris, as well as the Kalamazoo Medievalist Congress) have responded quite warmly, and Arthur Little at UCLA has already read the book and given it a lovely blurb.

 

If any of you do reviews of Shakespeare-themed works, S&S has advanced reader copies available for reviewers. You can request one from Mellony Torres < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >.

 

In addition, I know a September pub date makes it difficult to consider a book for the 2014-15 school year, but if you use contemporary fiction in any of your classes and think you might want to put JULIET’S NURSE on your syllabus, I think you should be able to request as ARC for consideration. Those requests should go to Megan Reid < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >.

 

For the rest of you, I’ll let the list know when the book is officially available this autumn.

 

-Lois Leveen

 
 
Lear and Families

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.328  Monday, 28 July 2014

 

From:        John Knapp < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 17, 2014 at 11:53:25 AM EDT

Subject:    Lear and Families

 

Readers of SHAKSPER might be interested in reading Joe Carroll’s essay, “An Evolutionary Approach to Shakespeare’s King Lear” in a recent collection of mine:  Critical Insights: Family. Ipswich, MA: Salem P, 2013: 83-103.

 

John V. Knapp,

Professor of English, Emeritus;

Editor, Style.

Department of English,

Northern Illinois University

 
CFP: The IASEMS Graduate Conference at The British Institute of Florence

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.327  Monday, 28 July 2014

 

From:        Ilaria Natali < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 22, 2014 at 8:55:54 AM EDT

Subject:    CfP: The IASEMS Graduate Conference at The British Institute of Florence

 

Dear Colleague,

 

Please find enclosed the CFP for the forthcoming IASEMS (Italian Association of Shakespearean and Early Modern Studies) Graduate Conference at The British Institute of Florence, “Humour in Shakespeare’s Arcadia: Gender, Genre, and Wordplay in Early Modern Comedy”. The conference will take place in Florence (Italy), 23rd April 2015, and is in continuity with the annual Graduate Conference organized by The British Institute of Florence. The deadline for proposals is Friday 31 October 2014.

We hope this event may be of interest to some of you and would be very grateful for circulation or publication of the attached PDF document.

 

Thank you in advance for your attention,

Ilaria Natali

___________________________

University of Florence, Italy

IASEMS member 

 

IASEMS

Italian Association of Shakespearean and Early Modern Studies

 

 

Shakespeare and his Contemporaries

The IASEMS Graduate Conference at The British Institute of Florence

 

Call for Papers

HUMOUR IN SHAKESPEARE’S ARCADIA:

GENDER, GENRE, AND WORDPLAY IN EARLY MODERN COMEDY

 

Florence 23rd April 2015

 

The 2015 IASEMS Graduate Conference at The British Institute in Florence is a one-day interdisciplinary and bilingual English-Italian forum open to PhD students and researchers who have obtained their doctorates within the past 5 years. This year’s conference will focus on the theme of comedy in early modern texts, and on how humour is produced in language and plot, what purposes it serves and how it can be related to issues of gender and genre. From Mikhail Bakhtin’s emphasis on the comic body to more recent explorations of the way erotic desire can be displaced by humour, early modern texts offer endless examples of improvisatory, situational or physical humour (whether deriving from the Elizabethan clown tradition or from the comic counterparts in medieval miracle and mystery plays) as well as sophisticated scripted humour and parody of romantic clichés. As is well known, humour, or “comic relief” can also be found in non-comic texts, such as tragedies, romances, epic poetry or pamphlets, often causing disruption of generic expectations and blurring the lines of genre distinction. Proposals can therefore address, from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives, the impact and the implications of humour or comedic infiltrations in a wide range of early modern English texts.

 

Candidates are invited to send a description of their proposed contribution according to the following guidelines:

 

• the candidate should provide name, institution, contact info, title and a short abstract of the proposed contribution (300 words for a 20-minute paper), explaining the content and intended structure of the paper, and including a short bibliography

• abstracts are to be submitted by  Friday 31 October 2014 by email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

• all proposals will be blind-vetted. The list of selected papers will be available by the end of November 2014

• each finished contribution is to last no longer than 20 minutes and is to be presented in English (an exception will be made for Italian candidates of departments other than English, who can present papers in Italian): Candidates whose first language is not English will need to have their proposals and final papers checked by a mother-tongue speaker

• participants will be asked to present a final draft of the paper ten days before the Conference.

 

Selected speakers who are IASEMS members can apply for a small grant (http://www.maldura.unipd.it/iasems/iasems_about.html)

 

For further information please contact Ilaria Natali  ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )

 
 
Romeo and Juliet in Harlem . . .

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.315  Friday, 11 July 2014

 

From:        Aleta Chappelle (AletaFilms) < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 9, 2014 at 5:41:02 PM EDT

Subject:    Romeo and Juliet in Harlem . . . 

 

My name is Aleta Chappelle and I wrote the screenplay adaptation and I’m the director of ROMEO AND JULIET IN HARLEM. The film has been accepted at the Downtown Los Angeles Film Festival and it will screen Wednesday, July 16th at 7PM.

 

We would love to get the word out to the Shakespeare community, not only because we’d love to have them come to the screening but also we’d love them to follow our progress on Facebook.

 

Here’s our Facebook page;

 

https://www.facebook.com/RomeoandJulietinHarlem

 

Here’s more info about the screening and tickets;

 

http://wl.flavorus.com/event/ROMEO-AND-JULIET-IN-HARLEM/252417?afflky=DowntownFilmFestivalLA

 

Our “new” shorter ROMEO & JULIET in HARLEM Trailer:

http://youtu.be/Xug1Xq9iCfM

 

 

I know it’s short notice but I hope you can help us. This is a unique production with a total cast of color and our goal it to keep Shakespeare’s works alive as we perform his text in a modern day urban setting.

 

Please contact me if you have questions or need more information.

 

Thank you,

Aleta

 
 
Shakespeare Digital Challenge

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.314  Friday, 11 July 2014

 

From:        Alexa Huang < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 9, 2014 at 5:55:44 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare Digital Challenge

 

From Alexa Huang, Chair of the MLA Committee on the New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare 

 

Announcement

 

The New Variorum Shakespeare Digital Challenge: The Second Round

 

The MLA Committee on the New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare (NVS) is sponsoring its second digital challenge to find the most innovative and compelling uses of the data contained in one of the NVS editions. This year the MLA is making available the XML files and schema for two volumes, The Winter’s Tale and The Comedy of Errors, under a Creative Commons BY-NC 3.0 license.

 

Scholars can freely download the XML files and schema from GitHub: https://github.com/mlaa/nvs-challenge.

 

The committee seeks entries featuring new means of displaying, representing, and exploring this data in the most exciting API, interface, visualization, or data-mining project. It is especially interested in entries that combine the NVS data with another Shakespearian project, such as Folger Digital Texts, Internet Shakespeare Editions, or Open Source Shakespeare. The goal is to see the possibilities of the NVS in digital form and, in particular, the innovations in scholarly research that might be enabled by opening up the NVS’s code. Projects will thus be judged both on the quality of the interface they provide for the NVS and on the insights produced by the mash-up.

 

The deadline for entries is 1 September 2014. The committee will assess the submissions and select the winner no later than 1 October 2014. The prize of $500 and an award certificate will be given at the 2015 MLA convention in Vancouver.

 

Entries may be sent to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Questions about the NVS Digital Challenge should be addressed to Kathleen Fitzpatrick, director of scholarly communication, at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

For more information about our partner projects, please contact Michael Best ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ), of Internet Shakespeare Editions, or Eric Johnson ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ), of Open Source Shakespeare and Folger Digital Texts.

 

Please note that our partners are available to answer questions about the resources, not to provide technical support.

 

For more info and to see winners of the first round, visit: http://www.mla.org/nvs_challenge

 
 
Global Shakespeare—Announcement and Job Opportunity

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.311  Wednesday, 9 July 2014

 

From:        Anna Boneham < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 9, 2014 at 10:03:50 AM EDT

Subject:    Global Shakespeare—Announcement and Job Opportunity

 

I am the administrator working on Global Shakespeare which is a new partnership between Queen Mary University of London and Warwick University which aims to shape the future research agenda in Shakespeare studies across criticism, performance, history and media; from television to digital reproduction. It is being led by David and has recently been launched with a Masters programme beginning 2014/15.

 

Our website is www.globalshakespeare.ac.uk

 

And we are very excited to be recruiting two Global Shakespeare Research Fellows through Warwick with a deadline of 23rd July. The job advert is live and is can be accessed through this link. http://bit.ly/1qKtTDk

 

Anna Boneham 

Executive Officer Global Shakespeare

Queen Mary University of London

University of Warwick

 
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 2 of 46

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.