Announcements

CFP: WSC 2016 Seminar "Shakespeare, Collaboration, and Co-Creation"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.333  Monday, 20 July 2015

 

From:        Angelika Zirker <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 20, 2015 at 5:54:36 AM EDT

Subject:    Announcement Seminar WSC 2016 - Call for papers

 

Shakespeare, Collaboration, and Co-Creation - Call for Papers WSC 2016

 

Leaders: Matthias Bauer (Tübingen University), John D. Cox (Hope College), David Scott Kastan (Yale University), and Angelika Zirker (Tübingen University)

 

It is the aim of the seminar to offer a new perspective on Shakespeare and his contemporaries by refocusing notions of creativity and artistic production as co-creativity. Whereas social and textual practices of collaboration in Early Modern theatre have been widely studied (mostly with the aim of identifying Shakespeare’s or any other individual author’s part), comparatively little work has been done on the poetics of co-authorship. We suggest that it is fruitful to establish links between concepts of the writer as a co-creator and the works themselves, which may, in various forms, appear as the result of collaboration—even when authored by Shakespeare (or another writer) alone. Thus we hope to provide a platform for reconsiderations of what it meant to produce poetry and drama in Shakespeare’s time, and to establish the idea that, more often than not, co-creation lay at the heart of literary production. 

 

We invite papers that address religious and secular, Christian and classical notions of (co-)creativity, but also central notions of poetic creativity, such as the poet as a “maker” and the concept of imitation, as well as literary products that are regarded as being written with the idea of co-creation in mind. 

  

PD Dr. Angelika Zirker

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

 

CFP: FMRSI CONFERENCE 2016

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.332  Monday, 20 July 2015

 

From:        Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 17, 2015 at 3:18:01 PM EDT

Subject:    CFP: FMRSI CONFERENCE 2016 

 

https://fmrsi.wordpress.com/12432-2/

 

MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES IN IRELAND

 

CONFERENCE 2016

FORUM FOR MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES IN IRELAND

FORUM UM LÉANN NA MEÁN-AOISE AGUS AN RENAISSANCE IN ÉIRINN

 

The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe:
   Sight and Visual Perception

University College Dublin, 11–12 March 2016

 

Proposals for papers are invited for The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Sight and Visual Perception, which aims to provide an international and interdisciplinary forum for researchers with an interest in the history of the senses in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

 

The history of the senses is a rapidly expanding field of research. Pioneered in Early Modern and Modern studies, it is now attracting attention also from Medieval and Renaissance specialists. Preoccupation with the human senses and with divine control over them is evident in a range of narrative texts, scientific treatises, creative literature, as well as the visual arts and music from the pre-modern period. This conference – the first in a series devoted to the five senses – aims to contribute to this expansion by bringing together leading researchers to exchange ideas and approaches.

 

The theme of the inaugural meeting is ‘Sight and Visual Perception’. Sight has been chosen as the first topic for investigation as it was considered the primary sense and was treated as an abstract philosophical and religious concept in many medieval texts. But the study of sight can also provide insights into various aspects of medieval society: ‘eye-witness’ descriptions; sight impairment and the care of the blind; deprivation of sight as punishment or revenge; the development of spectacles and other optical aids; ideas about colours and their significance; ‘second sight’ as manifested in visions and apparitions; the concept of ‘the gaze’ in visual arts. The conference aims to address these and other themes and to foster interaction between established and younger scholars working in the area.

 

Keynote Speakers

Professor Elizabeth Robertson, University of Glasgow

Professor Chris Woolgar, University of Southampton

 

Professor Robertson’s research and publications are concerned with vernacular theology, medieval poetics, literacy in the Middle Ages, and gender and religion in Middle English literature. Her recent work has focused on vision and touch in devotional literature. With J. Jahner she edited Medieval and Early Modern Devotional Objects in Global Perspective: Translations of the Sacred for the New Middle Ages series (Palgrave MacMillan, 2010). This collection contains her important paper, ‘Julian of Norwich’s Unmediated Vision’.

 

Professor Woolgar’s research and publications are concerned with the social and economic history of late-medieval England and in particular with the evidence contained in domestic household accounts. He is the author of The Senses in Late Medieval England (Yale, 2007) and co-author of A Cultural History of the Senses in the Middle Ages, 500–1450, ed. Richard Newhauser (Bloomsbury Academic, 2014).

 

Contributions on any aspect of the conference theme of ‘Sight and Visual Perception’ are welcomed from established and early career scholars as well as postgraduates. Proposals for panels are also warmly encouraged. Titles and abstracts (maximum 300 words) together with a short biography, institutional affiliation and contact details, should be forwarded to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 8 November 2015.

 

The conference is organised by Edward Coleman, School of History, UCD and the Forum for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in Ireland. It is generously supported by UCD Seed Funding.

 

Organizing Committee:

Dr Edward Coleman (University College Dublin)

Dr Ann Buckley (Queen’s University Belfast / Trinity College Dublin)

Dr Carrie Griffin (University of Bristol)

Dr Emer Purcell (University College Cork)

 

Forum for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in Ireland (FMRSI)

Web: www.fmrsi.wordpress.com
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ForumMRSI Twitter: @FMRSI

 

 

Shakespeare Pulse

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.326  Friday, 17 July 2015

 

From:        Ron Severdia <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 16, 2015 at 12:59:16 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare Pulse

 

Shakespeare Pulse is a small project that I’ve been working on for a few years on and off. I’m happy to say it’s finally come of age as a central place for Shakespeare news syndicated from all over the world. It’s located at:

 

https://www.playshakespeare.com/pulse

 

There are over 65 sources from news outlets, blogs, podcasts, theatre companies, and more. The postings can be filtered by time and category, and also include tags from their sources to locate by subject. It’s made for a great viewing experience on desktop and mobile devices.

 

I think this would be a good thing to share with your members. I’m looking for more Shakespeare-specific feeds to add and would love feedback on ways to improve it.

 

In a separate matter, I’m looking for teachers who want to use the Shakespeare app for Apple devices (or are already using it) in the classroom and possibly would like to be beta testers. I’d love some feedback on how to improve it and what would make it a better teaching tool. Since that’s a separate topic, it’s probably better as a separate message and they can email me directly at this email.

 

Ron

 

Reconsidering the Construction of Italy in Shakespeare and His Contemporaries - Call for Papers WSC 2016

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.325  Friday, 17 July 2015

 

From:        Michele Marrapodi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 15, 2015 at 11:26:47 AM EDT

Subject:    Reconsidering the Construction of Italy in Shakespeare and His Contemporaries - Call for Papers WSC 2016 

 

“Reconsidering the Construction of Italy in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries”

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Seminar proposal for WSC 2016 

Leaders:

Professor Michele Marrapodi, University of Palermo, 

and Dr. Jason Lawrence, University of Hull.

 

In 1993 the afterword to Shakespeare’s Italy was provocatively subtitled “the Law of Diminishing Returns”, highlighting the limitations of works of “the ‘Shakespeare and’.... variety”. This apparently exhausted approach has continued to attract much scholarly attention: the new millennium has seen two books entitled Shakespeare and Italy and popular travelogues have re-proposed the contested issue of Shakespeare’s direct knowledge of Italy. Different perspectives have challenged traditional approaches based on simplistic double-sided constructs of imitation and xenophobia, emphasizing how the “Italian factor” is “deeply concerned with questions of ideological appropriation, involving an array of issues and responses subjected to a process of political negotiation, confrontation, and opposition”(Marrapodi, 2007, 2014). Holderness’s presentist directions in Shakespeare and Venice (2010) are followed by Visions of Venice in Shakespeare (Tosi-Bassi, 2011), debating “the Venetian plays as intellectual sites of interacting voices and discourses from the most diverse cultural collocations”. This seminar welcomes contributions that address any aspect of the use of Italy and Italian culture in the drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries in order to reassess the relationship between the plays’ “poetic geography”, the historical city-states and courts, and the ways in which English dramatists reconstructed this stage-world in line with their own traditions and dramatic agendas.

 

Michele Marrapodi,

University of Palermo, Italy.

 

Book Announcement - The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.321  Tuesday, 14 July 2015

 

From:        Rebecca Mortimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 13, 2015 at 7:20:34 AM EDT

Subject:    Book Announcement - The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660

 

Dear All,

 

I am writing with regards to a forthcoming publication which may be of interest to you, The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660

 

Editors: Simon SmithJacqueline Watson and Amy Kenny 

Hardback

ISBN: 978-0-7190-9158-2 

Manchester University Press 

 

Considering a wide range of early modern texts, performances and artworks, the essays in this collection demonstrate how attention to the senses illuminates the literature, art and culture of early modern England. Examining canonical and less familiar literary works alongside early modern texts ranging from medical treatises to conduct manuals via puritan polemic and popular ballads, the collection offers a new view of the senses in early modern England.

The volume offers dedicated essays on each of the five senses, each relating works of art to their cultural moments, whilst elsewhere the volume considers the senses collectively in particular cultural contexts. It also pursues the sensory experiences that early modern subjects encountered through the very acts of engaging with texts, performances and artworks. This book will appeal to scholars of early modern literature and culture, to those working in sensory studies, and to anyone interested in the art and life of early modern England.

 

Kind regards,

Rebecca Mortimer

Sales and Marketing Executive 

History, Literature and Theatre

www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk

 

Advice

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.314  Wednesday, 8 July 2015

 

From:        Stephen Greenblatt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 3, 2015 at 3:43:11 AM EDT

Subject:    Advice

 

Dear Colleague,

 

I am writing to you, as a scholar and teacher of Renaissance English literature, to ask your advice. We are beginning the process of preparing a new edition  - the 10th — of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. In the particular section which I edit — the 16th century and early 17th century — I think I will be able, without serious cuts, to make one significant addition of a new text or a new “cluster” of shorter texts (such as the one we currently have on the sonnets).  I attach a PDF with the current table of contents.

 

So the question is, what should I choose?  What would make the most significant impact? What is most annoyingly or strikingly absent?  What would help an undergraduate course you have been teaching or could imagine teaching in this period?  

 

I am grateful to you for any suggestions. And, as I wear another hat, as the General Editor of the whole thing, I would be grateful for suggestions you might have for additions or changes to any of the period volumes.

 

With best wishes,

Stephen Greenblatt  

 

 

TOC of Norton Anthology 16th Century Literature:  pdf Norton 16thcentury TOC (123 KB)

 

New Issue Announcement - Cahiers Elisabethains 87.1 (Spring 2015)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.313  Wednesday, 8 July 2015

 

From:        Rebecca Mortimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 3, 2015 at 7:14:27 AM EDT

Subject:    New Issue Announcement - Cahiers Elisabethains 87.1 (Spring 2015)

 

*Apologies for cross-posting*

 

The Saint-Omer First Folio: Perspectives on a New Shakespearean Discovery

Mayer, Jean-Christophe

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.1

 

'Needful Woe': Tragedy, King John and the Gods

Luis-Martinez, Zenon

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.2

 

Staging the Sherleys' Travails

Hutchings, Mark

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.3

 

Grave Relations: Hamlet, Jyuran Hisao's 'Hamuretto', the Emperor and the War

Ashizu, Kaori

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.4

 

France and the Norman Lamord in Hamlet

Ovens, Michael

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.5

 

Masking and Unmasking in Verdi's Falstaff: (Meta)theatrical Tour de Force in L'Opera de Tours

Fischer, Susan L.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.6

 

Play Reviews

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.7

 

Shakespeare and Emotion: A Review Essay

Sullivan, Erin

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.8

 

Book Reviews

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.9

 

Books Received

 

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.10

 

CFP for Critical Survey: Special Issue on Shakespeare and War

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.312  Wednesday, 8 July 2015

 

From:        Patrick Gray <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 3, 2015 at 7:01:32 AM EDT

Subject:    CFP for Critical Survey: Special Issue on Shakespeare and War

 

CFP for Critical Survey: Special Issue on “Shakespeare and War”

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Critical Survey Special Issue

Shakespeare and War

Guest Editor: Patrick Gray, Durham University

 

The tercentenary of Shakespeare’s death fell in 1916, in the midst of the First World War, and the quatercentenary will fall next year, 2016, amid what looks likely to be continuing conflict in the Middle East, in the wake of more than two decades of intensive Western military engagement in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya.

 

Recent research on Shakespeare and war includes Franziska Quabeck, Just and Unjust Wars in Shakespeare (2013); Irena Makaryk and Marissa McHugh, eds., Shakespeare and the Second World War (2012); Paola Pugliatti, Shakespeare and the Just War Tradition (2010); and Ros King and Paul Franssen, eds., Shakespeare and War (2009).

 

Notable recent productions include Ivo van Hove’s Kings of War (2015), re-imagining Henry V1-3 Henry VI, and Richard III, as well as the BBC’s acclaimed Hollow Crown miniseries (2012), presenting Shakespeare’s second tetralogy of English history plays. If production plans hold, the second season of the series, The Wars of the Roses, presenting the first tetralogy, will appear next year in 2016.

 

In light of this critical and popular interest, as well as current events, Critical Survey invites essays in the range of 5,000 to 7,000 words, inclusive, on any aspect of the connection between Shakespeare and war, to be submitted by 15 January 2016. Innovative critical approaches will be considered, as well as historicist scholarship; in keeping with the aims of Critical Survey, the only core requirement is language that is clear, concise, and accessible.  

 

Informal inquiries about possibilities for essays, as well as proposals for book reviews, performance reviews, and review essays, are welcome and encouraged. Please direct all correspondence to the guest editor, Patrick Gray, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Submissions should be sent by 15 January 2016 by email to the same address, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., as Microsoft Word documents. Two hard copies, anonymized for peer review, should also be sent, along with a separate cover letter, to the mailing address for Critical Survey: 

 

Critical Survey
English Literature Group
School of Humanities
University of Hertfordshire

A style guide and additional submission information is available online: 

 

http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/cs/

 

Patrick Gray

Lecturer in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature

Department of English Studies

Durham University

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

https://www.dur.ac.uk/english.studies/academicstaff/?id=11777

 

Call for Papers Extended: ESTS

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.245  Wednesday, 27 May 2015

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 26, 2015 at 1:26:52 PM EDT

Subject:    Call for Papers Extended

 

The Call for Papers for the 12th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Textual Scholarship has been extended to 30 June 2015. Details follow.

 

“Users of Scholarly Editions: Editorial Anticipations of Reading, Studying and Consulting”

 

The 12th Annual Conference of the European Society for 

Textual Scholarship (ESTS) will be held at the Centre

for Textual Studies, De Montfort University, Leicester

England 19-21 November 2015

 

The ESTS returns to Leicester where it was founded in 2001 to stage a major collective investigation into the state and future of scholarly editing. Our focus is the needs of users of scholarly editions and proposals for 20-minute papers are invited on topics such as:

 

* Are users' needs changing?

* How does edition design shape use?

* Stability in print and digital

* Where are we in the study of mise en page?

* Facsimiles and scholarly editions

* Collaborative and social editing

* Editorial specialization in the digital age

* APIs and mashups versus anticipation

* The logic of annotation

* Is zero the best price point for editions?

* Readers versus users

* Can we assume a general reader'?

* Indexing and annotation versus search

* Editors, publishers and Open Access

* Is technology changing editing?

* Digital editions or digital archives?

* Are editions ever obsolete?

* Scholarly editions versus popular editions

* Any other topic related to the use or users of scholarly editions

 

Plenary Speaker (subject to confirmation) include:

 

Hans Walter Gabler (Munich University)

David Greetham (City University of New York)

Tim William Machan (Notre Dame University)

Gary Taylor (Florida State University)

Elaine Treharne (Stanford University)

Andrew Prescott (Glasgow University)

Christina Lee (Nottingham University)

Terri Bourus (Indiana University)

Peter Robinson (University of Saskatchewan)

 

Hands-on workshops will be given on setting movable type, letterpress printing, and getting started with XML.

 

Proposals for papers should be emailed to Prof Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

 

See http://cts.dmu.ac.uk/ESTS for information and registration

 

Call for Panel Presenters: ‘Shakespeare and Nordic Music’ as a part of ‘Shakespeare and Scandinavia’ Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.239  Monday, 25 May 2015

 

From:        Michelle Assay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 24, 2015 at 10:22:12 AM EDT

Subject:    Call for Panel Presenters: ‘Shakespeare and Nordic Music’ as a part of ‘Shakespeare and Scandinavia’ Conference

 

Call for Panel Presenters: ‘Shakespeare and Nordic Music’, (deadline for abstracts 1 July, 2015)

 

International Conference 'Shakespeare and Scandinavia', Kingston University, 8-11 October, Kingston-upon-Thames

 

http://blogs.kingston.ac.uk/ssku/calls-for-panel-presenters-deadline-for-abstracts-1-july-2015/

 

From the songs of Christoph Ernst Friedrich Weyse and Peter Arnold Heise to Finnish folk-rock group Apulanta (‘Today Shakespeare was born and died’) Shakespeare has figured in many branches of Nordic music without ever gaining the kind of prominence that major operatic settings accorded him in other European cultural centres. Probably the most significant contribution is Sibelius’s score for The Tempest (1925-26) consisting of more than an hour of some of his finest music. But lesser-known contributions by Sibelius’s compatriot Aulis Sallinen (King Lear opera, 2000), his Danish contemporary Carl Nielsen (incidental music for Shakespeare celebrations, 1916), Norwegian Arne Nordheim (a Tempest ballet in 1979, incidental music to King Lear in 1985, various vocal/ensemble settings with electronic background), and even Grieg (‘Watchman’s Song’ from Macbeth, c. 1867) begin to suggest a more significant picture than has been passed down to us.

 

Papers are invited on any aspect of Shakespeare and Nordic Music, covering all genres, styles and historical periods, and techniques of reworking, not excluding musical responses less concrete than text-settings or tone poems directly on Shakespearean themes. Questions of national temperament may also be addressed: is it mere essentialism to propose, for instance, that Nordic artists are instinctively drawn to those dramas that stress elemental natural forces and emotional bleakness – as the examples cited above would seem to indicate – rather than to, say, Shakespeare’s ‘Southern’ subjects?

 

Panel conveners: Michelle Assay (Universities of Sheffield and Paris Sorbonne) and David Fanning (University of Manchester)

 

Please forward abstracts of no more than 500 words, and a brief bio (2-3 sentences), to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 1 July, 2015.

--

 

Michelle Assay

Université Paris Sorbonne, University of Sheffield

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

REED Publication Announcement: ‘On the Road Again: A digital forum in the history of entertainment and culture’

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.210  Sunday, 10 May 2015

 

From:        Sally-Beth MacLean <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 4, 2015 at 1:05:37 PM EDT

Subject:    REED Publication Announcement: On the Road Again: A digital forum in the history of entertainment and culture

 

ANNOUNCING THE LAUNCH OF

‘On the Road Again: A digital forum in the history of entertainment and culture

<https://otra.library.utoronto.ca>

 

This new online resource integrates four scholarly projects on a modular extensible platform, to support the ability to make linkages between different aspects of performance history over time, and to work interactively with other theatre historians on creating new scholarship. The forum has been built using the open-source Drupal platform and Openlayers GIS mapping through partnership with the University of Toronto Libraries (Digital Library and Web Services Group - for database design and sustainability), and the Department of Geography (GIS and Cartography Office – for interactive mapping.) The forum includes two previous digital database projects in the history of itinerant performance, while adding two more.

 

  1. Records of Early English Drama (REED): Patrons and Performances <https://reed.library.utoronto.ca> 
  2. Juba Project (Early Blackface Minstrelsy in Britain) 
  3. Fringes of Show Business in Canada West: Performance culture in Southern Ontario to 1919 (new) 
  4. The Exhibition and Reception of American Popular Film in Canada (new)  

We are grateful to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada for making this work possible through a Connections grant. The partners involved are listed on the individual project sites. 

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Make a Gift to SHAKSPER

Consider making a gift to support SHAKSPER.