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Correction: CFP Shakespeare in Slavic/Eastern European Countries

 


The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0316  Monday, 8 July 2013

 

From:        Michelle Assay < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 4, 2013 11:30:19 AM EDT

Subject:     Correction: CFP Shakespeare in Slavic/Eastern European Countries

 

Dear Shakespearian colleagues,

 

We would like to make a slight modification to the previously published CFP regarding Shakespeare 450 anniversary in Paris. Our previous title “Shakespeare in Slavic Countries” seems inadvertently to leave out countries such as Hungary, even though we do speak of “Eastern and Central Europe” in the text of CFP. Thus we think it is best if we change the title to “Shakespeare in Slavic/ Eastern European countries”, and likewise add  “Eastern European” to all other references to the subject of the panel.

 

Unfortunately there is also a typo in the text, as you might have noticed. After Sandor Petofi’s quote which is from Zdeněk Stříbrný’s book, Shakespeare in Eastern Europe, the year mentioned should of course be 1847 not 1947.

 

We hope that these changes will soon appear on the conference website.

 

In the meantime we thank you for your understanding and attention.

 

Best regards

David Fanning and Michelle Assay

 

-- 

This is the corrected CFP.

 

Panel: Shakespeare and Slavic/ East and Central European Countries

 

‘The Slavs’ great capacity for hero worship, particularly for the man of intellect, has given Shakespeare as high a place in their estimation as we would give a military hero returning from a victory’ (Cyril Bryner, 1941).

‘Shakespeare. Change his name into a mountain, and it will surpass the Himalayas…Before his appearance the world was incomplete’ (Sándor Petőfi, 1847).

This panel will study Shakespeare’s adoption and adaptation within the countries of Eastern and Central Europe, including those comprising the former USSR. Angles such as the historic, cultural, political, theatrical, and translation studies will be considered.

Shakespeare’s journey in Central and Eastern Europe goes as far back as tours of English comedians during his lifetime and soon after his death to the court of Zygmunt III of Poland. The 18th century saw the first attempts at appropriating and adapting his work in the Russian language, with Sumarokov’s first quasi-translation of Hamlet. The age of National movements in European cultural and political life continued well into the 19th century, as did admiration for Shakespeare. In Russia of the Romantic era, Shakespeare and Byron were two major sources of inspiration for poets, artists and composers. Tchaikovsky dreamt of composing an opera based on Hamlet, but he found the Danish Prince’s irony untranslatable into music. However, he did not shrink from composing incidental music and symphonic pieces based on Shakespeare’s plays. Apart from productions, translations, and adaptations, studies and analysis of Shakespeare’s plays began to appear. The Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 and the arrival of Socialist doctrines brought more overtly political shades into Shakespeare productions, along with experimental interpretations especially during the avant-garde 20s and early 30s. Wartime Shakespeare took various shapes and colours to fit the purposes and morale of the various nations - for example, certain more introspective plays such as Hamlet were absent from most Soviet stages. The Thaw saw two great cinema adaptations of Shakespeare by Grigori Kozintsev, as well as many key Shakespeare studies, such as Jan Kott’s, Shakespeare our contemporary (1964).

Discussion topics for the panel include but are not limited to:

  • History of Shakespeare translations into Slavic/ Central and Eastern European languages
  • Shakespeare stage productions in the (former) Eastern Bloc
  • Shakespeare and the Soviet Union
  • Shakespeare and Russian/Soviet music
  • Shakespeare and cinema in the (former) Eastern Bloc
  • Shakespeare studies in Slavic/ Central and Eastern European countries

Please submit abstracts (200-300 words) and brief biography (c.150 words) including your affiliation by 1 August 2013 to the panel convenors: Michelle Assay ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) and Professor David Fanning ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). 

 
 
Shakespearean Configurations

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0317  Monday, 8 July 2013

 

From:        Jean-Christophe Mayer < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 30, 2013 1:10:44 PM EDT

Subject:     Shakespearean Configurations

 

Dear List-Members,

 

We hope some of you might be interested in the following volume, which has just been released and is freely accessible:

 

Shakespearean Configurations, Early Modern Literary Studies Special Issue 21 (2013)

Edited by Jean-Christophe Mayer, William H. Sherman, Stuart Sillars and Margaret Vasileiou

 

With contribution from Dympna Carmel Callaghan (Syracuse University), Lori Anne Ferrell (Claremont University), Atsuhiko Hirota (University of Kyoto), Jeffrey Todd Knight (University of Washington), Agnes Lafont (University of Montpellier), Jean-Christophe Mayer (CNRS and University of Montpellier), Andrew Murphy (University of St. Andrews), Svenn-Arve Myklebost (University of Bergen), William H. Sherman (University of York, UK), Stuart Sillars (University of Bergen), Sarah Stanton (Cambridge University Press)

 

Summary of contents: 

This collection takes a fresh look at configurations—and reconfigurations—of Shakespeare from the first quartos to the most recent incarnations. It offers new approaches for studying the packaging of the plays and poems through time, between cultures and across media. We have been prompted to explore the potential of the concept of configuration by two sweeping developments in Shakespeare Studies: the sustained attack on the idea of an authentic, original text produced by a single, isolated author; and a corresponding attention to the reformulation and assimilation of Shakespeare’s texts in cultures very different from the one in which they were created. These two areas (the one associated with Textual Scholarship and the other with Adaptation, Performance and Postcolonial Studies) have only recently begun to speak to each other, and together they pose a set of far-reaching questions which the essays gathered here seek to investigate.

 

Freely accessible at: <http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/si-21/00-Contents.htm>

 

CONTENTS:

 

• Shakespearean Configurations: Introduction. [1] Jean-Christophe Mayer (CNRS and University of Montpellier), William H. Sherman (University of York, UK), Stuart Sillars (University of Bergen)

 

• Configuring the Book. [2] Andrew Murphy (University of St. Andrews)

 

• Publishing Shakespeare. [3] Sarah Stanton (Cambridge University Press)

 

• Punctuation as Configuration; Or, How Many Sentences Are There In Sonnet 1? [4] William H. Sherman (University of York, UK)

 

• Shakespeare and the Order of Books. [5] Jean-Christophe Mayer (French National Centre for Scientific Research and University of Montpellier)

 

• Shakespeare in Bundles. [6] Jeffrey Todd Knight (University of Washington)

 

• Updating Folios: Readers’ Reconfigurations and Customisations of Shakespeare. [7] Noriko Sumimoto (Meisei University)

 

• Extra-illustrating Shakespeare. [8] Lori Anne Ferrell (Claremont University)

 

• Thoughts on the Illustrated Edition. [9] Stuart Sillars (University of Bergen)

 

• The Kingdoms of Lear in Tate and Shakespeare: A Restoration Reconfiguration of Archipelagic Kingdoms. [10] Atsuhiko Hirota (University of Kyoto)

 

• Mythological Reconfigurations on the Contemporary Stage: Giving a New Voice to Philomela in Titus Andronicus. [11] Agnès Lafont (University of Montpellier)

 

• Difference vs. Change: The Theory of Configuration. [12] Svenn-Arve Myklebost (University of Bergen)

 

• Shakespearean Configurations: Afterword. [13] Dympna Carmel Callaghan (Syracuse University)

 

With our best wishes,

The Editors.

 
 
CFP: Shakespearean Journeys: 1st ASA Conference (Taipei)

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0308  Monday, 24 June 2013

 

From:        ASA < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 21, 2013 7:56:11 PM EDT

Subject:     CFP: Shakespearean Journeys: 1st ASA Conference (Taipei)

 

CALL for PAPERS and SEMINAR PROPOSALS

 

Shakespearean Journeys:

The Inaugural Conference of the Asian Shakespeare Association

 

Taipei, 15-17 May 2014

 

By land or sea, across city and country, journeys comprise an important motif in Shakespeare’s works, be they smooth or perilous, round trip or to an undiscovered country from whose bourne no travelers return. The journeys undertaken can be physical, emotional, spiritual, or a combination. Though not in person, Shakespeare also journeys extensively, crossing not only time and space but also language, culture, and media. A most versatile and protean voyager, Shakespeare sometimes travels light and does as the locals do, yet sometimes carries heavy baggage and remains a stranger in a foreign land.

“Shakespearean Journeys” aims to explore all aspects of this theme. Topics include, but are not limited to:

 

--Travel and relocation in early modern Europe

--Shakespearean travelers, exiles, shipwrecks

--Geographic discovery and the New World

--Emotional or spiritual journeys

--Foreign Shakespeare: translation, adaptation, and teaching

--Transnational, cross-cultural, interdisciplinary, or intergeneric theory or practice

 

Keynote Speakers:

--Peter Holbrook, University of Queensland, Chair of the International Shakespeare Association

--Kawachi Yoshiko, Kyorin University

--Lena Cowen Orlin, Georgetown University, Executive Director of the Shakespeare Association of America

--Shen Lin, Central Academy of Drama (China)

 

Special Guests:

--Rustom Bharucha, Jawaharlal Nehru University, cultural critic and theatre director

--Ing K(anjanavanit), filmmaker, journalist, painter, writer

 

Live Performances:

--Betrayal (an adaptation of Cardenio by Rom Shing Hakka Opera Troupe from Taiwan, dir. Wu Ziming)

--King Lear (a modern rock adaptation by Nomad Theatre from Korea, dir. Son Jeung-Woo)

--Sintang Dalisay (an adaptation of Romeo and Juliet in traditional music and dance by Tanghalang Ateneo from the Philippines, dir., Ricardo Abad)

 

Film Screening:

--Shakespeare Must Die (an adaptation of Macbeth from Thailand, dir. Ing K)

 

Submission Guidelines:

The conference includes both paper sessions and seminars. Graduate students are welcome.

 

(1)   Paper: please submit a 250-word abstract, plus a short bio.

(2)   Seminar: please submit a 250-word description of the seminar, plus a short bio including a summary of your previous seminar experience. 

 

Fees:

All conference participants must be registered members of the ASA and must remit the conference registration fee. If you wish to apply for a need-based fee waiver or a travel grant, please add a paragraph of explanation.

 

Deadline:

Deadline for submission is 15 August 2013. Results will be announced in September.

 

Contact:

Submissions and queries should be sent to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Updates:

For conference updates, please visit http://AsianShakespeare.org

 
 
Call for Papers (Paris Shakespeare Anniversary 2014)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0304  Friday, 21 June 2013 (Corrected 8 July)

From:        Michelle Assay < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 21, 2013 5:21:54 AM EDT

Subject:     Call for Papers (Paris Shakespeare Anniversary 2014) 

 

http://www.shakespeareanniversary.org/?Panel-22-Shakespeare-and-Slavic

 

 

Panel: Shakespeare and Slavic/ East and Central European Countries

‘The Slavs’ great capacity for hero worship, particularly for the man of intellect, has given Shakespeare as high a place in their estimation as we would give a military hero returning from a victory’ (Cyril Bryner, 1941).

‘Shakespeare. Change his name into a mountain, and it will surpass the Himalayas…Before his appearance the world was incomplete’ (Sándor Petőfi, 1847).

This panel will study Shakespeare’s adoption and adaptation within the countries of Eastern and Central Europe, including those comprising the former USSR. Angles such as the historic, cultural, political, theatrical, and translation studies will be considered.

Shakespeare’s journey in Central and Eastern Europe goes as far back as tours of English comedians during his lifetime and soon after his death to the court of Zygmunt III of Poland. The 18th century saw the first attempts at appropriating and adapting his work in the Russian language, with Sumarokov’s first quasi-translation of Hamlet. The age of National movements in European cultural and political life continued well into the 19th century, as did admiration for Shakespeare. In Russia of the Romantic era, Shakespeare and Byron were two major sources of inspiration for poets, artists and composers. Tchaikovsky dreamt of composing an opera based on Hamlet, but he found the Danish Prince’s irony untranslatable into music. However, he did not shrink from composing incidental music and symphonic pieces based on Shakespeare’s plays. Apart from productions, translations, and adaptations, studies and analysis of Shakespeare’s plays began to appear. The Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 and the arrival of Socialist doctrines brought more overtly political shades into Shakespeare productions, along with experimental interpretations especially during the avant-garde 20s and early 30s. Wartime Shakespeare took various shapes and colours to fit the purposes and morale of the various nations - for example, certain more introspective plays such as Hamlet were absent from most Soviet stages. The Thaw saw two great cinema adaptations of Shakespeare by Grigori Kozintsev, as well as many key Shakespeare studies, such as Jan Kott’s, Shakespeare our contemporary (1964).

Discussion topics for the panel include but are not limited to:

  • History of Shakespeare translations into Slavic languages
  • Shakespeare stage productions in the Eastern Bloc
  • Shakespeare and the Soviet Union
  • Shakespeare and Russian/Soviet music
  • Shakespeare and cinema in the Eastern Bloc
  • Shakespeare studies in Slavic countries

Please submit abstracts (200-300 words) and brief biography (c.150 words) including your affiliation by 1 August 2013 to the panel convenors: Michelle Assay ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) and Professor David Fanning ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ).


-- 

 

Michelle Assay

Université Paris Sorbonne, University of Sheffield

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
CFP: The Shakespeare Institute Review

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0295  Saturday, 15 June 2013

 

From:        Shakespeare Institute Review < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 14, 2013 2:01:25 PM EDT

Subject:     CFP: The Shakespeare Institute Review

 

Dear all,

 

The second issue of The Shakespeare Institute Review was released at the end of the recent BritGrad conference. The issue, which explores Shakespeare in relation to the superhuman, showcases a thoughtful, engaging and creative range of contributions and can be found at this link: www.shakesreview.com .

 

Following on from this, we warmly invite submissions for the third issue of the Review, an online academic journal to which postgraduate students of Shakespeare and related programmes are invited to contribute. Please find below and here: http://www.shakesreview.com/news.html . Students are encouraged to submit papers between 1,500 and 3,000 words on topics relating to love and lust in Shakespeare, with a deadline of 31 August 2013

 

Detailed style guidelines can be found here: www.shakesreview.com/style-guidelines.html . Selected submissions will be published in the third issue of the Review. Please share this with students of your and other departments who may be interested. If you have further questions or comments please let us know by email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or via the contact form on www.shakesreview.com/contact.html  .  

 

 

The Shakespeare Institute Review - Call for Papers for the Third Issue

 

The Shakespeare Institute Review is an online academic journal funded by the University of Birmingham College of Arts and Law, and to which students at the Shakespeare Institute and on other postgraduate programmes are encouraged to contribute. Each issue has a theme to which contributors are invited to respond.


Continuing on from the first two issues of the journal, which explored death and the superhuman in Shakespeare, we thought it appropriate to segue into an examination of human emotion and passion with a theme of love and lust, running the gamut from the shameful to the sublime.  Students are therefore encouraged to submit papers between 1,500 and 3,000 words on topics relating to Love and Lust in Shakespeare. Possible topics might include, but are not restricted to:


· What is the meaning of love in a Shakespearean sense? What place does love or lust occupy in our collective imagination or human experience? Why are we fascinated by it, spawning a plethora of literature, art, and cultural artefacts ranging from romance novels, movies and plays to erotic literature, art, and even pornography? Why do we seem to have a collective cultural obsession with love and its successful resolution? 

· Critical examinations of Shakespeare’s lovers or love relationships; instances of the romantic, the erotic, or the bawdy in Shakespeare. In particular, we would be interested in papers on the idealised, the idolised, and the scorned. This could include close reading, comparative analysis, etc.


· Considerations of the political, ethical, religious, spiritual, and/or existential significance of love (or lust) in the Early Modern period, and of how Shakespeare makes use of (and plays off) those conceptualisations in his works. 

· More intensely personal and experientially engaged writing on how Shakespeare’s works have affected your understanding of what love might mean, and what it means to experience love or lust? Is it just a matter of experiencing certain feelings, or is it a quality of mind and attitude? How do we define love and lust; where is the line between love and lust—might they be seen as “higher” and “lower” expressions of the same human instinct?


Papers should be submitted to  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  , with a deadline of 31 August 2013. Please refer to the following style guidelines:

www.shakesreview.com/style-guidelines.html  

All submissions will be reviewed by the editorial board (Thea Buckley, Paul Hamilton, and John Langdon), and those submissions that are selected will be published in our third online issue. For further information, please contact us at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or via the contact form on

 www.shakesreview.com/contact.html

 

Yours faithfully,

The Editorial Board --

Paul Hamilton, John Langdon and Thea Buckley

Shakespeare Institute doctoral research student

 

 
Shakespeare Plays and Festivals

 

Shakespeare Plays and Festivals (Updated June 20, 2013)

 

UNITED STATES 

 

ARKANSAS

 

Arkansas Shakespeare Theater, June 6-30. Village at Hendrix in Conway and the Argenta Arts District in North Little Rock: “Much Ado About Nothing”. At Reynolds Performance Hall, Arkansas Shakespeare: “King Lear,” “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (866) 810-0012, arkshakes.com.

 

 

CALIFORNIA

 

A Noise Within, Pasadena. Pericles, Prince of Tyre (Sept 7 - Nov 24, 2013). Macbeth (Mar 8 - May 11, 2014). http://www.anoisewithin.org

 

California Shakespeare Theater, Orinda. “Romeo and Juliet” (July 3-July 28), “A Winter’s Tale” (Sept. 25-Oct. 20). (510) 548-9666, calshakes.org.

 

Shakespeare Santa Cruz July 23-Sept. 1. Sinsheimer-Stanley Festival Glen: “The Taming of the Shrew” and “Henry V”. 

 

The Old Globe, San Diego. June 2-Sept. 29. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “The Merchant of Venice” and “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.” (619) 234-5623, theoldglobe.org.

 

 

COLORADO

 

Colorado Shakespeare Festival, Boulder. Mary Rippon Theater: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (June 8-Aug. 11), “Macbeth” (June 29-Aug. 10). University Theater: “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)” (June 14-Aug. 10) and “Richard II” (July 19-Aug. 11). (303) 492-8008, coloradoshakes.org.

 

 

CONNECTICUT

 

International Festival Of Arts And Ideas, New Haven, June 15-29. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” (888) 278-4332, artidea.org.

 

 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

 

Shakespeare Theater Company, Sidney Harman Hall: “Much Ado About Nothing ” (Aug. 20-Sept. 1), Lansburgh Theatre: “The Winter’s Tale” (through June 23). (202) 547-1122, shakespearetheatre.org.

 

 

ILLINOIS

 

Chicago Shakespeare Theater “Chicago Shakespeare in the Parks” production of “The Comedy of Errors” (July 26-Aug. 25). (312) 595-5600, chicagoshakes.com.

 

 

INDIANA

 

Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival The Comedy of Errors (July 21 – August 26). Richard III  (August 20 – September 1). Othello (September 18 – 20).  shakespeare.nd.edu

 

 

KENTUCKY

 

Shakespeare Behind Bars, Luther Luckett Correctional Complex, Richard III (June 17-20). http://www.shakespearebehindbars.org/programs/kentucky/llcc/

 

 

LOUISIANA

 

The New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane University: The Merry Wives of Windsor (June 13-29). http://neworleansshakespeare.tulane.edu

 

 

MAINE

 

Mainestage Shakespeare, July 5-Aug. 10. “Hamlet” and “Much Ado About Nothing,” “The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged).” (207) 467-5118, (207) 646-5511, ogunquitplayhouse.org.

 

 

MARYLAND

 

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, Ellicott City. “Antony and Cleopatra” (June 7-July 14) and “Taming of the Shrew” (June 21-Aug. 4). (410) 313-8661, chesapeakeshakespeare.com.

 

 

MASSACHUSETTS

 

Commonwealth Shakespeare Company, Boston, July 6-28. “The Two Gentlemen of Verona”. (617) 426-0863, commshakes.org.

 

Shakespeare & Company, Lenox. “Women of Will”, “The Tempest,” “Love’s Labour’s Lost” (June 22-Sept. 1) and “Richard II” (July 5-21). (413) 637-3353 , shakespeare.org.

 

Vineyard Playhouse Tisbury Amphitheater “Henry IV” (July 17-Aug. 17). (508) 693-6450, vineyardplayhouse.org.

 

 

MICHIGAN

 

Lakeside Shakespeare Theatre, Frankfort, MI. Romeo and Juliet (July 23, 25, 27, 30 July and 1 Aug.). Comedy of Errors (July 24, 26, 28, 31 and 2 Aug.). http://www.lakesideshakespeare.org/lst/

 

 

The Michigan Shakespeare Festival Twelfth Night (July 18-Aug. 10). King John (July 20-Aug. 9). (517) 998-3673, https://app.arts-people.com/index.php?ticketing=msf

 

 

MISSOURI

 

The Missouri Shakespeare Festival Campus of Missouri Southern State University. Macbeth (June 27-29) http://www.mssu.edu/ticket-office/theatre-tickets.php.

 

 

NEBRASKA

 

Flatwater Shakespeare Festival, Lincoln, Much Ado About Nothing (6-30 June 2013). 402-473-2897 http://www.flatwatershakespeare.org/default.php

 

 

The Nebraska Shakespeare Festival, Elmwood Park, adjacent to the University of Nebraska, Omaha campus. Twelfth Night, or What You Will (a musical adaptation) – June 20-23, July 3, 5, 7. Titus Andronicus – June 27-30, July 2, 6. nebraskashakespeare.com.

 

 

NEVADA

 

Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (July 12-Aug. 25). (800) 747-4697, laketahoeshakespeare.com.

 

 

NEW JERSEY

 

Shakespeare Theater of New Jersey “As You Like It” (June 19-July 28). 408-5600, shakespearenj.org.

 

 

NEW YORK CITY

 

Delacorte Theater, Central Park. “Comedy of Errors” (May 28-June 30 ), “Love’s Labour’s Lost, A New Musical” (July 23-Aug. 18), a special musical adaptation of “The Tempest” (Sept. 6-8). (212) 967-7555, shakespeareinthepark.org.

 

 

NEW YORK STATE

 

Chautauqua Theater Company “Comedy of Errors” (Aug. 9-16). (716) 357-6250, theater.ciweb.org.

 

Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival, Garrison, June 11-Sept. 1. “King Lear” and “All’s Well That Ends Well”. (845) 265-9575, hvshakespeare.org.

 

Shakespeare In Delaware Park, Buffalo. “Hamlet” (June 20-July 14) and “Measure for Measure” (July 25-Aug. 18). (716) 856-4533, shakespeareindelawarepark.org.

 

 

OREGON

 

Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Ashland, through Nov. 3. “Cymbeline,” “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “King Lear,” “The Taming of the Shrew.” (541) 482-4331, osfashland.org.

 

 

PENNSYLVANIA

 

Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival “Measure for Measure” (July 18-Aug. 4) and “Henry VIII” (July 24-Aug. 4) at DeSales University . (610) 282-9455, pashakespeare.org.

 

 

SOUTH DAKOTA

 

Bare Bodkins Theatre Company, Sioux Falls. Romeo and Juliet (begins 5 July 2013). 605- 940-2356 http://barebodkins.org/home.html

 

 

TENNESSEE

 

Nashville Shakespeare Festival “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (Aug. 15-Sept. 15). (615) 255-2273, nashvilleshakes.org.

 

 

UTAH

 

Utah Shakespeare Festival, Cedar City, June 24-Oct. 19. “The Tempest,” “King John.” (800) 752-9849, bard.org.

 

 

VERMONT

 

Vermont Shakespeare Company “The Winter’s Tale” at Oakledge Park in Burlington (Aug. 8-18). (877) 874-1911, vermontshakespeare.org.

 

 

VIRGINIA

 

American Shakespeare Center, Staunton. June 11-Sept. 1. “Romeo and Juliet,” “All’s Well That Ends Well.” (877) 682-4236, ASCStaunton.com.

 

 

WISCONSIN

 

American Players Theater, Spring Green, June 8-Oct. 20. An adaptation of “Antony and Cleopatra”. “The Two Gentlemen of Verona,” “Hamlet” and Tom Stoppard’s riff “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead”. (608) 588-2361, americanplayers.org.

 

 

CANADA

 

ONTARIO

 

Stratford Festival, Ontario, through Oct. 20. “Romeo and Juliet,” “Othello,” “The Merchant of Venice” and “Measure for Measure”. (800) 567-1600, stratfordfestival.ca

 

BRITISH COLUMBIA

 

Bard On The Beach” Shakespeare Festival, Vancouver. Twelfth Night (June 12 to Sept. 14), Hamlet (June 13—Sept. 12), Measure for Measure (July 3—Sept. 13). http://www.bardonthebeach.org/ 

 

 

EUROPE

 

CZECH REPUBLIC

 

Letní Shakespearovské slavnosti  (25 June- 7 September):  A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Taming of the Shrew, Richard III (in two different productions/ translations: Czech and Slovak), Merry Wives of Windsor, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Love’s Labour’s Lost, and Twelfth Night. 

 

Summer Shakespeare Festival Ostrava (22 July- 9 August): This sister festival to Prague summer Shakespeare Festival: Midsummer Night’s Dream, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Merry Wives of Windsor, Richard III, and Love’s Labour’s Lost. 

 

 

GERMANY

 

Shakespeare Festival in Globe Neuss (13 June-13 July): With Shakespeare in Love–Sonette für the Dark Lady (the “Dark Lady” sonnets), As You Like It (Kote Jarjanishvili State Drama Theatre from Tiflis), Twelfth Night (the Propeller Company), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Bremer Shakespeare Company), King Lear (Globe Theatre on Tour),  Der Kaufmann vo Venedig (The Merchant of Venice) (Sad Rheinische Landestheater), As You Like It (bat-Studiotheater der Hoschule für Schauspielkunst Ernst Busch, Berlin)

 

Bremer Shakespeare Company  (Shakespeare in the Park, 14th - 18 August):  Richard III, Macbeth, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Pericles, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. 

 

Shakespeare Company Berlin (12 June- 21 September):  Macbeth, Richard III, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, All’s Well That Ends Well, Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, and The Taming of the Shrew. 

 

 

HUNGARY

 

Shakespeare Festival Gyula (4-15 July): Shakespeare Sonnets (Ildikó Mándy Company), Hamlet (Joint performance of the Gyula Castle Theatre and the Tamási Áron Theatre of Sfântu Gheorghe, dir. László Bocsárdi), W.S.: Hamlet (Performed by the University Theatre and Film Arts Budapest, dir. Sándor Zsótér), Taming of the Shrew (A performance by The National Theatre Tirgu-Mures Tompa Miklós Company (RO), dir. Sorin Militaru).

 

 

POLAND

 

The Gdansk Shakespeare Festival (1-6 August): “Songs of Lear.” 

 

 

SPAIN

 

Festival Shakespeare (6-12 June): Julio César (dir. Paco Azorín ), Diagnòstic Hamlet (Cia. Pelmànec), Big Will Shakespeare  (dir. Quim Lecina), La caiguda de ‘HLa Julieta (dir. Oriol Broggi). 

 

 

The starting point for this list is both Steven McElroy’s May 16, 2013, New York Times list of Summer US and Canadian Summer Shakespeare Festivals.

 

http://theater.nytimes.com/2013/05/19/theater/summer-2013-theater-listings.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1&

 

and 

 

Colleen Kennedy’s European Summer Shakespeare Festivals (originally posted on The Shakespeare Standard):  http://theshakespearestandard.com/a-great-feast-of-languages-european-summer-shakespeare-festivals-global-shakespeare-news-for-the-week-of-june-8-2013/ 

 

All additions are welcome by e-mailing the editor at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 
 
Stephen Booth Guest Speaker Chesapeake Shakespeare Company

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0290  Thursday, 13 June 2013

 

From:        Kevin Costa < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Wednesday, June 12, 2013 8:13 AM

Subject:     Stephen Booth Guest Speaker Chesapeake Shakespeare Company

 

The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company’s summer season is underway in Ellicott City, MD (a historic town about twenty minutes from Baltimore and DC). This summer, CSC presents Antony & Cleopatra (directed by Ralph Alan Cohen, co-found of The American Shakespeare Center) and The Taming of the Shrew (directed by CSC’s founding artistic director, Ian Gallanar). 

 

For years, CSC has offered a program called "Extended Versions," pre-show talks and presentations where audience members have an opportunity to engage with actors, directors, and scholars. We are very pleased to announce that Stephen Booth, professor emeritus at UC-Berkeley, will be speaking on Friday, June 21at 7 pm at the Patapsco Female Institute (the location of our outdoor theatre) accompanied by Sarah Enloe, Director of Education at the American Shakespeare Center. The talk is included in our regular ticket price.

 

For tickets and more information, please visit CSC’s Web site: www.chesapeakeshakespeare.com or contact Kevin Costa, Director of Education at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Kevin J. Costa, Ph.D.

Education Director

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company

www.chesapeakeshakespeare.com

Teaching Artist, Folger Shakespeare Library

 
 
CFP—Shakespeare 450: Shakespeare and Global Girlhood

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0289  Thursday, 13 June 2013

 

From:        Ariane Balizet < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 13, 2013 10:33:03 AM EDT

Subject:     CFP—Shakespeare 450: Shakespeare and Global Girlhood

 

Société française Shakespeare Conference: Shakespeare 450

Paris, April 21-27 2014

 

Call for papers: Shakespeare and Global Girlhood

Seminar leaders: Marcela Kostihová and Ariane Balizet

 

This seminar explores the ways in which Shakespeare is employed to define girlhood within and across national and cultural boundaries. When, how, and why does Shakespeare intersect with questions of girlhood? How does Shakespeare reflect, validate, or undermine debates over girls and girlhood? How are representations of girls in relation to Shakespeare (in adaptation, popular citation, or pedagogical practices) employed in conversations on global citizenship and/or national identity? We are particularly interested in papers (3,000-5,000 words) that identify Shakespearean influence in the study of girls and girlhood in advocacy, education, performance, artistic production (by, about, or marketed towards girls), cross-national politics, neoliberal subjectivity, citizenship, material culture, and health.

 

How does Shakespeare’s cultural capital influence the discourses of girlhood? The study of girls and girlhood has gained prominence in the past 20 years, marked by the rise of Girls’ Studies and the proliferation of interdisciplinary publications devoted to girlhood. In the United States, the 1994 publication of psychologist Mary Pipher’s Reviving Ophelia was a flashpoint in the legitimization of girlhood studies, linking one of Shakespeare’s tragic girl characters to the definition of Western female adolescence as a period of crisis. Since then, the name “Ophelia” has become powerfully associated with organizations that aim to “save” girls from bullying, eating disorders, and mental health issues (among other threats). International efforts explicitly dedicated to empowering women and young girls—such as the United Nations’ Resolution to designate October 11 the International Day of the Girl Child—reflect the idea that addressing the needs of young women is a global concern. In light of this increased awareness of the status of girls, events such as the assassination attempt of Pakistani blogger Malala Yousafzai—just two days before the first International Day of the Girl Child—reveal the profound and fundamental oppression facing many girls and their advocates worldwide. These tensions inform feminist scholarship on contemporary perspectives on Shakespeare’s girls, as modern productions and adaptations are increasingly set within a global context.  Despite the wealth of feminist scholarship on girls in Shakespeare, however, the extent to which Shakespeare’s cultural capital is used to articulate or authorize popular, political, and national definitions of girlhood has not received significant attention.

 

 

Proposals should be sent to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it by July 15, 2013. Please include name, email, affiliation, brief bio, preliminary abstract (250 words) and title of your contribution.

 

 

Conference Website: http://www.shakespeareanniversary.org/?-Shakespeare-450-

 

Seminar Website: http://www.shakespeareanniversary.org/?Seminar-19-Shakespeare-and-Global

 

 

Ariane M. Balizet

Assistant Professor of English and Women’s Studies

Texas Christian University

Department of English

 
 
SGC 2014 - Call For Papers

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0288  Wednesday, 12 June 2013

 

From:        Sofia Novello < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 12, 2013 8:37:29 AM EDT

Subject:     SGC 2014 - Call For Papers

 

The British Institute of Florence 

Shakespeare and His Contemporaries 

Graduate Conference 2014 

 

 

Call for Papers 

6th Annual Postgraduate Conference 10th April 2014 

 

 The British Institute of Florence’s annual Shakespeare Graduate Conference is a one-day interdisciplinary and bilingual English- Italian forum open to PhD students and researchers who have obtained their doctorates within the past 5 years. This year’s conference theme is Shakespeare and His Contemporaries: Forms of Nationhood. Contributions are welcomed on the topic of national identity and representations of Elizabethan England in the literary production of William Shakespeare and his contemporaries (playwrights, poets and others) across different disciplines (not limited to): literature, comparative studies, history, art history, cinema and theatre history. 

 

Candidates are invited to send a description of their proposed contribution according to the following guidelines: 

  • the candidate should  provide  name, institution, contact info, title and short abstract of  the proposed contribution (200-300 words for 20-minute paper), explaining  the content and intended structure of the paper, and including a short bibliography.
  • abstracts are to be submitted by Wednesday 30 October 2013 by email to snovello@britishinstitute.it.
  • all proposals will be blind-vetted. The list of selected papers will be available by the end of November 2013.
  • each finished contribution is to last no longer than 20 minutes and is to be presented in English (an exception will be made for Italian candidates of  departments other than English, who can present   papers in Italian). Candidates whose first language is not English will need to have their proposals and final papers checked by a mother-tongue speaker.
  • participants will be asked to present a final draft of the paper a week before the Conference.
  • participants must be members of the Harold  Acton Library choosing between a 3, 6 or 12 month membership. Memberships can be paid for on the day of conference. For details on Library Membership rates and benefits please visit the website www.britishinstitute.it.
  • The British Institute cannot reimburse any travel or accommodation expenses.
  • paper submitted will be considered for publication in the onlin proceedings edition of the ‘Shakespeare  and  His Contemporaries Graduate Conference (see the website    www.britishinstitute.it for previous volumes of the proceedings).

 

Deadline for abstracts Wednesday 30 October 2013. 

 

For more information contact Sofia Novello at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .  

 

 

Sofia Novello

Library Assistant & Co-ordinator of the Shakespeare Graduate Conference

The British Institute of Florence

Palazzo Lanfredini

Lungarno Guicciardini 9

50125 Firenze

Italia

 

 
 
“The Past and Future of the Book” Symposium, Memphis

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0287  Wednesday, 12 June 2013

 

From:        Scott Newstok < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 10, 2013 3:20:58 PM EDT

Subject:     “The Past and Future of the Book” Symposium, Memphis

 

“The Past and Future of the Book” Symposium

 

On October 10-11, 2013, the Pearce Shakespeare Endowment at Rhodes College will host a free public symposium on “The Past and Future of the Book”:

 

www.rhodes.edu/book

 

Invited speakers include Robert Darnton (Harvard University), Lukas Erne (University of Geneva), and Michael Witmore (Folger Shakespeare Library).

 

Co-sponsored by the Spence L. Wilson Chair in Humanities, the Marcus Orr Center for the Humanities at the University of Memphis, and the Rhodes College chapter of Phi Beta Kappa.

 

Please contact Scott Newstok ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) for further information.

 

 

***

 

ABOUT THE PEARCE SHAKESPEARE ENDOWMENT

 

www.rhodes.edu/shakespeare

 

Thanks to the generosity of the late Dr. Iris Annette Pearce, Rhodes College enjoys an unusually wide range of Shakespeare-related resources. The Pearce Shakespeare Endowment was established in 2007 to enrich courses in Shakespeare and support events for the entire campus as well as the greater Memphis community. Dr. Pearce attended Rhodes College in the 1940s, when it was named Southwestern at Memphis, before graduating from Vanderbilt University. During World War II, she joined the women’s corps of the U.S. Naval Reserve (WAVES). As a medical student, she followed a long-established path in her family, where four generations of physicians preceded her. Yet she was also breaking new ground as a woman: she was one of only two female students in her University of Tennessee class; she served as the first female internal medicine resident at John Gaston Hospital (The Med); and she eventually became the director of the City of Memphis Hospitals while serving as a professor at the University of Tennessee. Her bequest generously continues to support her lifelong enthusiasm for Shakespeare. The late professor of Shakespeare studies at Rhodes, Dr. Cynthia Marshall, was instrumental in establishing preliminary planning for this bequest.

 
 
Summer Shakespeare Plays and Festivals

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0284  Monday, 10 June 2013

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Monday, June 10, 2013

Subject:     Summer Shakespeare Plays and Festivals

 

The starting point for this list is both Steven McElroy’s May 16, 2013, New York Times list of Summer US and Canadan Summer Shakespeare Festivals.

 

http://theater.nytimes.com/2013/05/19/theater/summer-2013-theater-listings.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1&

 

and 

 

Colleen Kennedy’s European Summer Shakespeare Festivals: http://theshakespearestandard.com/a-great-feast-of-languages-european-summer-shakespeare-festivals-global-shakespeare-news-for-the-week-of-june-8-2013/

 

All additions are welcomely e_mailing the editor at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

 

 

Summer Shakespeare Plays and Festivals

 

ARKANSAS

 

ARKANSAS SHAKESPEARE THEATER, June 6-30. Village at Hendrix in Conway and the Argenta Arts District in North Little Rock: “Much Ado About Nothing”. At Reynolds Performance Hall, Arkansas Shakespeare: “King Lear,” “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (866) 810-0012, arkshakes.com.

 

 

CALIFORNIA

 

CALIFORNIA SHAKESPEARE THEATER Orinda. “Romeo and Juliet” (July 3-July 28), “A Winter’s Tale” (Sept. 25-Oct. 20 ). (510) 548-9666, calshakes.org.

 

SHAKESPEARE SANTA CRUZ July 23-Sept. 1. Sinsheimer-Stanley Festival Glen: “The Taming of the Shrew” and “Henry V”. 

 

THE OLD GLOBE San Diego. June 2-Sept. 29. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “The Merchant of Venice” and “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.” (619) 234-5623, theoldglobe.org.

 

 

COLORADO

 

COLORADO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Boulder. Mary Rippon Theater: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (June 8-Aug. 11), “Macbeth” (June 29-Aug. 10). University Theater: “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)” (June 14-Aug. 10) and “Richard II” (July 19-Aug. 11). (303) 492-8008, coloradoshakes.org.

 

 

CONNECTICUT

 

INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF ARTS AND IDEAS New Haven, June 15-29. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” (888) 278-4332, artidea.org.

 

 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

 

SHAKESPEARE THEATER COMPANY Sidney Harman Hall: “Much Ado About Nothing ” (Aug. 20-Sept. 1), Lansburgh Theatre: “The Winter’s Tale” (through June 23). (202) 547-1122, shakespearetheatre.org.

 

 

ILLINOIS

 

CHICAGO SHAKESPEARE THEATER “Chicago Shakespeare in the Parks” production of “The Comedy of Errors” (July 26-Aug. 25). (312) 595-5600, chicagoshakes.com.

 

 

Indiana

NOTRE DAME SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL The Comedy of Errors (July 21 – August 26). Richard III  (August 20 – September 1). Othello (September 18 – 20).  shakespeare.nd.edu

 

 

MAINE

 

MAINESTAGE SHAKESPEARE July 5-Aug. 10. “Hamlet” and “Much Ado About Nothing,” “The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged).” (207) 467-5118, (207) 646-5511, ogunquitplayhouse.org.

 

 

MARYLAND

 

CHESAPEAKE SHAKESPEARE COMPANY Ellicott City. “Antony and Cleopatra” (June 7-July 14) and “Taming of the Shrew” (June 21-Aug. 4). (410) 313-8661, chesapeakeshakespeare.com.

 

 

MASSACHUSETTS

 

COMMONWEALTH SHAKESPEARE COMPANY Boston, July 6-28. “The Two Gentlemen of Verona”. (617) 426-0863, commshakes.org.

 

SHAKESPEARE & COMPANY Lenox. “Women of Will”, “The Tempest,” “Love’s Labour’s Lost” (June 22-Sept. 1) and “Richard II” (July 5-21). (413) 637-3353 , shakespeare.org.

 

VINEYARD PLAYHOUSE Tisbury Amphitheater “Henry IV” (July 17-Aug. 17). (508) 693-6450, vineyardplayhouse.org.

 

 

NEVADA

 

LAKE TAHOE SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (July 12-Aug. 25). (800) 747-4697, laketahoeshakespeare.com.

 

 

NEW JERSEY

 

SHAKESPEARE THEATER OF NEW JERSEY “As You Like It” (June 19-July 28). 408-5600, shakespearenj.org.

 

 

NEW YORK CITY

 

DELACORTE THEATER Central Park. “Comedy of Errors” (May 28-June 30 ), “Love’s Labour’s Lost, A New Musical” (July 23-Aug. 18), a special musical adaptation of “The Tempest” (Sept. 6-8). (212) 967-7555, shakespeareinthepark.org.

 

 

NEW YORK STATE

 

CHAUTAUQUA THEATER COMPANY “Comedy of Errors” (Aug. 9-16). (716) 357-6250, theater.ciweb.org.

 

HUDSON VALLEY SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Garrison, June 11-Sept. 1. “King Lear” and “All’s Well That Ends Well”. (845) 265-9575, hvshakespeare.org.

 

SHAKESPEARE IN DELAWARE PARK Buffalo. “Hamlet” (June 20-July 14) and “Measure for Measure” (July 25-Aug. 18). (716) 856-4533, shakespeareindelawarepark.org.

 

 

OREGON

 

OREGON SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Ashland, through Nov. 3. “Cymbeline,” “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “King Lear,” “The Taming of the Shrew.” (541) 482-4331, osfashland.org.

 

 

PENNSYLVANIA

 

PENNSYLVANIA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL “Measure for Measure” (July 18-Aug. 4) and “Henry VIII” (July 24-Aug. 4) at DeSales University . (610) 282-9455, pashakespeare.org.

 

 

TENNESSEE

 

NASHVILLE SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (Aug. 15-Sept. 15). (615) 255-2273, nashvilleshakes.org.

 

 

UTAH

 

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Cedar City, June 24-Oct. 19. “The Tempest,” “King John.” (800) 752-9849, bard.org.

 

 

VERMONT

 

VERMONT SHAKESPEARE COMPANY “The Winter’s Tale” at Oakledge Park in Burlington (Aug. 8-18). (877) 874-1911, vermontshakespeare.org.

 

 

VIRGINIA

 

AMERICAN SHAKESPEARE CENTER Staunton. June 11-Sept. 1. “Romeo and Juliet,” “All’s Well That Ends Well.” (877) 682-4236, ASCStaunton.com.

 

 

WISCONSIN

 

AMERICAN PLAYERS THEATER Spring Green, June 8-Oct. 20. An adaptation of “Antony and Cleopatra”. “The Two Gentlemen of Verona,” “Hamlet” and Tom Stoppard’s riff “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead”. (608) 588-2361, americanplayers.org.

 

 

CANADA

 

STRATFORD FESTIVAL Ontario, through Oct. 20. “Romeo and Juliet,” “Othello,” “The Merchant of Venice” and “Measure for Measure”. (800) 567-1600, stratfordfestival.ca

 

 

CZECH REPUBLIC

 

Letní Shakespearovské slavnosti  (25 June- 7 September):  A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Taming of the Shrew, Richard III (in two different productions/ translations: Czech and Slovak), Merry Wives of Windsor, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Love’s Labour’s Lost, and Twelfth Night. 

 

Summer Shakespeare Festival Ostrava (22 July- 9 August): This sister festival to Prague summer Shakespeare Festival: Midsummer Night’s Dream, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Merry Wives of Windsor, Richard III, and Love’s Labour’s Lost. 

 

 

GERMANY

 

Shakespeare Festival in Globe Neuss (13 June-13 July): With Shakespeare in Love–Sonette für the Dark Lady (the “Dark Lady” sonnets), As You Like It (Kote Jarjanishvili State Drama Theatre from Tiflis), Twelfth Night (the Propeller Company), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Bremer Shakespeare Company), King Lear (Globe Theatre on Tour),  Der Kaufmann vo Venedig (The Merchant of Venice) (Sad Rheinische Landestheater), As You Like It (bat-Studiotheater der Hoschule für Schauspielkunst Ernst Busch, Berlin)

 

Bremer Shakespeare Company  (Shakespeare in the Park, 14th - 18 August):  Richard III, Macbeth, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Pericles, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. 

 

Shakespeare Company Berlin (12 June- 21 September):  Macbeth, Richard III, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, All’s Well That Ends Well, Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, and The Taming of the Shrew. 

 

 

HUNGARY

 

Shakespeare Festival Gyula (4-15 July): Shakespeare Sonnets (Ildikó Mándy Company), Hamlet (Joint performance of the Gyula Castle Theatre and the Tamási Áron Theatre of Sfântu Gheorghe, dir. László Bocsárdi), W.S.: Hamlet (Performed by the University Theatre and Film Arts Budapest, dir. Sándor Zsótér), Taming of the Shrew (A performance by The National Theatre Tirgu-Mures Tompa Miklós Company (RO), dir. Sorin Militaru).

 

 

POLAND

 

The Gdansk Shakespeare Festival (1-6 August): “Songs of Lear.” 

 

 

SPAIN

 

Festival Shakespeare (6-12 June): Julio César (dir. Paco Azorín ), Diagnòstic Hamlet (Cia. Pelmànec), Big Will Shakespeare  (dir. Quim Lecina), La caiguda de ‘HLa Julieta (dir. Oriol Broggi). 

 
 
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