Announcements

New Issue Announcement - Cahiers Elisabethains 87.1 (Spring 2015)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.313  Wednesday, 8 July 2015

 

From:        Rebecca Mortimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 3, 2015 at 7:14:27 AM EDT

Subject:    New Issue Announcement - Cahiers Elisabethains 87.1 (Spring 2015)

 

*Apologies for cross-posting*

 

The Saint-Omer First Folio: Perspectives on a New Shakespearean Discovery

Mayer, Jean-Christophe

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.1

 

'Needful Woe': Tragedy, King John and the Gods

Luis-Martinez, Zenon

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.2

 

Staging the Sherleys' Travails

Hutchings, Mark

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.3

 

Grave Relations: Hamlet, Jyuran Hisao's 'Hamuretto', the Emperor and the War

Ashizu, Kaori

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.4

 

France and the Norman Lamord in Hamlet

Ovens, Michael

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.5

 

Masking and Unmasking in Verdi's Falstaff: (Meta)theatrical Tour de Force in L'Opera de Tours

Fischer, Susan L.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.6

 

Play Reviews

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.7

 

Shakespeare and Emotion: A Review Essay

Sullivan, Erin

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.8

 

Book Reviews

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.9

 

Books Received

 

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.10

 

CFP for Critical Survey: Special Issue on Shakespeare and War

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.312  Wednesday, 8 July 2015

 

From:        Patrick Gray <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 3, 2015 at 7:01:32 AM EDT

Subject:    CFP for Critical Survey: Special Issue on Shakespeare and War

 

CFP for Critical Survey: Special Issue on “Shakespeare and War”

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Critical Survey Special Issue

Shakespeare and War

Guest Editor: Patrick Gray, Durham University

 

The tercentenary of Shakespeare’s death fell in 1916, in the midst of the First World War, and the quatercentenary will fall next year, 2016, amid what looks likely to be continuing conflict in the Middle East, in the wake of more than two decades of intensive Western military engagement in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya.

 

Recent research on Shakespeare and war includes Franziska Quabeck, Just and Unjust Wars in Shakespeare (2013); Irena Makaryk and Marissa McHugh, eds., Shakespeare and the Second World War (2012); Paola Pugliatti, Shakespeare and the Just War Tradition (2010); and Ros King and Paul Franssen, eds., Shakespeare and War (2009).

 

Notable recent productions include Ivo van Hove’s Kings of War (2015), re-imagining Henry V1-3 Henry VI, and Richard III, as well as the BBC’s acclaimed Hollow Crown miniseries (2012), presenting Shakespeare’s second tetralogy of English history plays. If production plans hold, the second season of the series, The Wars of the Roses, presenting the first tetralogy, will appear next year in 2016.

 

In light of this critical and popular interest, as well as current events, Critical Survey invites essays in the range of 5,000 to 7,000 words, inclusive, on any aspect of the connection between Shakespeare and war, to be submitted by 15 January 2016. Innovative critical approaches will be considered, as well as historicist scholarship; in keeping with the aims of Critical Survey, the only core requirement is language that is clear, concise, and accessible.  

 

Informal inquiries about possibilities for essays, as well as proposals for book reviews, performance reviews, and review essays, are welcome and encouraged. Please direct all correspondence to the guest editor, Patrick Gray, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Submissions should be sent by 15 January 2016 by email to the same address, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., as Microsoft Word documents. Two hard copies, anonymized for peer review, should also be sent, along with a separate cover letter, to the mailing address for Critical Survey: 

 

Critical Survey
English Literature Group
School of Humanities
University of Hertfordshire

A style guide and additional submission information is available online: 

 

http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/cs/

 

Patrick Gray

Lecturer in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature

Department of English Studies

Durham University

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

https://www.dur.ac.uk/english.studies/academicstaff/?id=11777

 

Call for Papers Extended: ESTS

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.245  Wednesday, 27 May 2015

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 26, 2015 at 1:26:52 PM EDT

Subject:    Call for Papers Extended

 

The Call for Papers for the 12th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Textual Scholarship has been extended to 30 June 2015. Details follow.

 

“Users of Scholarly Editions: Editorial Anticipations of Reading, Studying and Consulting”

 

The 12th Annual Conference of the European Society for 

Textual Scholarship (ESTS) will be held at the Centre

for Textual Studies, De Montfort University, Leicester

England 19-21 November 2015

 

The ESTS returns to Leicester where it was founded in 2001 to stage a major collective investigation into the state and future of scholarly editing. Our focus is the needs of users of scholarly editions and proposals for 20-minute papers are invited on topics such as:

 

* Are users' needs changing?

* How does edition design shape use?

* Stability in print and digital

* Where are we in the study of mise en page?

* Facsimiles and scholarly editions

* Collaborative and social editing

* Editorial specialization in the digital age

* APIs and mashups versus anticipation

* The logic of annotation

* Is zero the best price point for editions?

* Readers versus users

* Can we assume a general reader'?

* Indexing and annotation versus search

* Editors, publishers and Open Access

* Is technology changing editing?

* Digital editions or digital archives?

* Are editions ever obsolete?

* Scholarly editions versus popular editions

* Any other topic related to the use or users of scholarly editions

 

Plenary Speaker (subject to confirmation) include:

 

Hans Walter Gabler (Munich University)

David Greetham (City University of New York)

Tim William Machan (Notre Dame University)

Gary Taylor (Florida State University)

Elaine Treharne (Stanford University)

Andrew Prescott (Glasgow University)

Christina Lee (Nottingham University)

Terri Bourus (Indiana University)

Peter Robinson (University of Saskatchewan)

 

Hands-on workshops will be given on setting movable type, letterpress printing, and getting started with XML.

 

Proposals for papers should be emailed to Prof Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

 

See http://cts.dmu.ac.uk/ESTS for information and registration

 

Call for Panel Presenters: ‘Shakespeare and Nordic Music’ as a part of ‘Shakespeare and Scandinavia’ Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.239  Monday, 25 May 2015

 

From:        Michelle Assay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 24, 2015 at 10:22:12 AM EDT

Subject:    Call for Panel Presenters: ‘Shakespeare and Nordic Music’ as a part of ‘Shakespeare and Scandinavia’ Conference

 

Call for Panel Presenters: ‘Shakespeare and Nordic Music’, (deadline for abstracts 1 July, 2015)

 

International Conference 'Shakespeare and Scandinavia', Kingston University, 8-11 October, Kingston-upon-Thames

 

http://blogs.kingston.ac.uk/ssku/calls-for-panel-presenters-deadline-for-abstracts-1-july-2015/

 

From the songs of Christoph Ernst Friedrich Weyse and Peter Arnold Heise to Finnish folk-rock group Apulanta (‘Today Shakespeare was born and died’) Shakespeare has figured in many branches of Nordic music without ever gaining the kind of prominence that major operatic settings accorded him in other European cultural centres. Probably the most significant contribution is Sibelius’s score for The Tempest (1925-26) consisting of more than an hour of some of his finest music. But lesser-known contributions by Sibelius’s compatriot Aulis Sallinen (King Lear opera, 2000), his Danish contemporary Carl Nielsen (incidental music for Shakespeare celebrations, 1916), Norwegian Arne Nordheim (a Tempest ballet in 1979, incidental music to King Lear in 1985, various vocal/ensemble settings with electronic background), and even Grieg (‘Watchman’s Song’ from Macbeth, c. 1867) begin to suggest a more significant picture than has been passed down to us.

 

Papers are invited on any aspect of Shakespeare and Nordic Music, covering all genres, styles and historical periods, and techniques of reworking, not excluding musical responses less concrete than text-settings or tone poems directly on Shakespearean themes. Questions of national temperament may also be addressed: is it mere essentialism to propose, for instance, that Nordic artists are instinctively drawn to those dramas that stress elemental natural forces and emotional bleakness – as the examples cited above would seem to indicate – rather than to, say, Shakespeare’s ‘Southern’ subjects?

 

Panel conveners: Michelle Assay (Universities of Sheffield and Paris Sorbonne) and David Fanning (University of Manchester)

 

Please forward abstracts of no more than 500 words, and a brief bio (2-3 sentences), to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 1 July, 2015.

--

 

Michelle Assay

Université Paris Sorbonne, University of Sheffield

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

REED Publication Announcement: ‘On the Road Again: A digital forum in the history of entertainment and culture’

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.210  Sunday, 10 May 2015

 

From:        Sally-Beth MacLean <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 4, 2015 at 1:05:37 PM EDT

Subject:    REED Publication Announcement: On the Road Again: A digital forum in the history of entertainment and culture

 

ANNOUNCING THE LAUNCH OF

‘On the Road Again: A digital forum in the history of entertainment and culture

<https://otra.library.utoronto.ca>

 

This new online resource integrates four scholarly projects on a modular extensible platform, to support the ability to make linkages between different aspects of performance history over time, and to work interactively with other theatre historians on creating new scholarship. The forum has been built using the open-source Drupal platform and Openlayers GIS mapping through partnership with the University of Toronto Libraries (Digital Library and Web Services Group - for database design and sustainability), and the Department of Geography (GIS and Cartography Office – for interactive mapping.) The forum includes two previous digital database projects in the history of itinerant performance, while adding two more.

 

  1. Records of Early English Drama (REED): Patrons and Performances <https://reed.library.utoronto.ca> 
  2. Juba Project (Early Blackface Minstrelsy in Britain) 
  3. Fringes of Show Business in Canada West: Performance culture in Southern Ontario to 1919 (new) 
  4. The Exhibition and Reception of American Popular Film in Canada (new)  

We are grateful to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada for making this work possible through a Connections grant. The partners involved are listed on the individual project sites. 

Shakespearean Performance Research Group 2015 CFP

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.209  Sunday, 10 May 2015

 

From:        Don Weingust <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 30, 2015 at 11:55:34 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespearean Performance Research Group 2015 CFP

 

The Shakespearean Performance Research Group

 

Conveners: Catherine Burriss (California State University, Channel Islands), Franklin J. Hildy (University of Maryland), Rob Ormsby (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Don Weingust (Southern Utah University / Utah Shakespeare Festival), and W. B. Worthen (Barnard College, Columbia University)

 

American Society for Theatre Research 2015 Conference

Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront Hotel

November 5-8, 2015

 

 

The Shakespearean Performance Research Group of the American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR) provides an ongoing home for the study of Shakespearean performance within ASTR.

 

In the disciplinary ferment of the 1980s, Shakespeare studies seemed to claim a stake in nearly everything: defining disciplines, political critique, the role of the academy, historicism, theory, and so on. And yet while Shakespeare looms large in the agenda of English and literary studies, Shakespeare figures differently in theatre and performance studies, both in terms of the development of the field(s) and today. What kind of work does the figure of Shakespeare, Shakespeare studies, and Shakespeare performance do in theatre and performance studies today? Are there specific stakes for the field that emerge in relation to Shakespeare studies, or for which Shakespeare studies is a useful instrument, metaphor, instance? Are there larger, deeper stakes in play evoked by the intersection of Shakespeare, theatre, performance? In keeping with the 2015 conference theme, we invite papers addressing these questions. While making these themes our primary focus, in keeping with the raisons d’être of ASTR Research Groups, we will also consider paper submissions on our current publishing project dealing with the evolution into modern times of the concept of the Elizabethan Revival, or “Original Practices” as it is now known. Papers addressing “Original Practices” from its early modern “origins,” through a variety of recovery/restoration efforts, to the present, are welcome, as are papers addressing this issue across performance media. Contributions examining OP in theory and practice will be considered for inclusion in a planned book project that will mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 2016.

 

Selected papers will be assigned to subgroups by the group’s conveners, Catherine Burriss, Franklin J. Hildy, Robert Ormsby, Don Weingust, and W. B. Worthen, and the conveners will organize on-line communication of subgroup members before the conference. At the conference session, papers will be discussed first within subgroups, after which the subgroups will come together to exchange ideas.

 

Please send a 250-word abstract along with a brief bio by May 31, 2015 to the conveners at:

 

    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Members will be notified by the end of June whether their proposals have been accepted for the working group.

 

More information about ASTR and the Portland conference may be found at http://www.astr.org

 

 

Announcing REED’s Civic London to 1558

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.208  Sunday, 10 May 2015

 

From:        Sally-Beth MacLean <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 28, 2015 at 10:35:47 PM EDT

Subject:    Announcing REED’s Civic London to 1558

 

The Records of Early English Drama and its publisher, Boydell & Brewer, are pleased to announce the long-anticipated publication of Civic London to 1558, 3 volume set in the REED series, edited by Anne Lancashire, with David J. Parkinson, assistant editor. The collection includes the major surviving Corporation and guild records from 1286 to 1558, while a detailed chronological appendix adds important supplementary items from the twelfth century to 1558, as recorded in city custumals and in some 100 national and local chronicle histories (Anglo-Norman, Latin, and English).

 

Sally-Beth MacLean

REED General Editor

New Web Design and Shakespeare on the Internet Update

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.207  Sunday, 10 May 2015

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Sunday, May 10, 2015

Subject:    New Web Design and Shakespeare on the Internet Update

 

Dear Faithful Subscribers,

 

I am sorry that it took more time than I had expected to get new web site design complete. I hope you will find the wait worthwhile.

 

The web site is now easier to navigate and looks clean and update-to-date with many new features and processes. Since the migration, the archive has not been completely indexed, a task that will take much time. I beg your patience regarding searches until the archive is indexed. I still have access to the old site and can do important searches for members if you send them to me. I hope that you will take the time to explore the site and send me any suggestions, omissions, or corrections: http://shaksper.net.

 

One place to look at is the SHAKSPER 2015 Plays and Festivals List (Updated April 14, 2015): http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/shakespeare-festivals-and-plays.

 

I have also been working and revised the “A Selected Guide to Shakespeare on the Internet”http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/shakespeare-on-the-internet. The Guide has been thoroughly updated by the deleting of links that did not work, the checking of all other links (with assistance from Will Sutton), the correcting sites that have changed their Internet addresses, the reorganizing of the link taxonomy, and the adding of many additional sites.

 

Please join me in thanking Ron Severdia of PlayShakespeare.com for hosting the SHAKSPER web site and redesigning it. Ron Severdia is an actor <http://rontheactor.com>, the founder of PlayShakespeare.com, the creator of the best Shakespeare iPhone/iPod/iPad app, the co-author of the O'Reilly publication Using Joomla: Building Powerful and Efficient Web Sites and he is on the Leadership Team of the Joomla Project. His prior experience includes stints as Creative Director of content design, Senior Designer and then Creative Director at Young & Rubicam, DDB, Glow, and Landor Associates. He is fluent in several languages, he worked for seven years in Europe, where he won a Euro-Effie award for his creative work with Schweppes. 

 

Enjoy the newly designed web site,

Hardy 

 

Shakespeare MOOC through University of Wisconsin Madison

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.205  Friday, 24 April 2015

 

From:        R L Widmann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 24, 2015 at 11:51:58 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare MOOC through University of Wisconsin Madison

 

My colleagues, Professor Jesse Stommel, Catherine DeRose, Sarah Marty, and I have set up a Shakespeare MOOC that runs from 23 April through 22 May 2015.  The University of Wisconsin Madison is sponsoring the course, which is on the Coursera platform.  We are discussing four plays, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Much Ado about Nothing, and The Tempest.   People can register for the course, Shakespeare in Community, at www.coursera.org  As always, the course is free and does not carry college credit.

 

We have about 16,000 participants so far and the discussion forums are involving a lot of people world-wide.

 

R L Widmann

Chief Knowledge Officer (CKO) of Hybrid Pedagogy Inc.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Shakespeare’s Globe Pops Up Downunder

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.203  Friday, 24 April 2015

 

From:        Team Pop-up Globe <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 23, 2015 at 2:37:56 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare’s Globe Pops Up Downunder

 

Here’s a fun story for Shakespeare’s birthday today - and the 399th Anniversary of his death. We’d be really grateful if you could find space to put this up, and help us to build the Pop-up Globe in time for next year’s 400th Anniversary.


Please feel free to contact us or Tobias Grant - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you want any more info or to do any interview via Skype etc.

You can see some coverage here:

 

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/entertainment/news/video.cfm?c_id=1503078&gal_cid=1503078&gallery_id=149551

 

The release is below, and loads more stuff at www.popupglobe.com  

 

High res stuff - images, video, press release - is at our media centre: http://bit.ly/1GkmFeR


Best wishes,

The Pop-up Globe Team


Media release - 23 April 2015.

For immediate release.

 

Shakespeare’s Globe Pops Up Downunder

World-first full-scale Pop-up Globe Theatre to rise 

in New Zealand for 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death

 

In exactly a year’s time the quatercentenary of William Shakespeare’s death will be marked with a performance of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night in stunning Elizabethan costumes, staged in the world’s first Pop-up Globe - a full-scale temporary replica of Shakespeare’s second Globe Theatre - in Auckland, New Zealand. 

 

Pop-up Globe is the brainchild of New Zealand-born UK-trained Doctor of Shakespeare Miles Gregory. 

 

“Seeing Shakespeare’s plays performed in the environment they were written for is a completely unique experience – as much a party as a performance” say Dr Gregory, who has twenty years international experience producing and directing theatre, including for Shakespeare’s Globe, London. 

 

Pop-up Globe will be a full-size temporary working replica of Shakespeare’s second Globe Theatre, made to its exact dimensions, designed using the world’s leading research, and big enough for a thousand people.

 

“This has never been done before”, Gregory adds.

 

Pop-up Globe will be built by Camelspace, local experts in constructing extraordinary temporary structures, present three months of theatre, celebrate Shakespeare’s life and work with a gala event on 23 April 2016, then tour the world.

 

“This is for more than Shakespeare lovers,” says Gregory, “It’s a thrilling live experience that puts the audience at the heart of the action. And with tickets starting from just $10, we can’t wait for opening night.”

 

The project has met with enthusiasm from Shakespeare's Globe London. "What a great idea” says Dominic Dromgoole, Artistic Director of Shakespeare’s Globe. “Touring Shakespeare has been a tradition since the plays were first written 400 years ago. We are delighted that the Globe building itself is now traversing the planet".

 

Tim Fitzpatrick, Associate Professor at Sydney University, on whose ground-breaking research the design has been based, says “Our research answers important questions around the shape and size of Shakespeare’s Globe, and challenges some of the fundamental assumptions made in the past about this fascinating theatre. People are going to be coming from the Northern Hemisphere to see this”. 

 

“It’s a game changer” says Nick Brown, facilitator of Dramanet, a global forum of 695 drama teachers, and Pop-up Globe Education & Outreach Consultant.

 

“We’re expecting to see literally thousands of teachers and students participate in Pop-up Globe. It will radically alter the way Shakespeare is taught and understood in New Zealand for years to come”.

 

Pop-up Globe has launched an international Kickstarter campaign for funding the first-phase construction of the theatre.  A multi-channel approach will then see final construction and operation funded through a combination of box office ticket sales, sponsorship, and state grants.

 

Dr Gregory says “We’ve been overwhelmed by the support we’ve already received from individuals and businesses both locally and internationally.”

 

“Now we’re looking for sponsors, arts donors, and proud New Zealanders to join us and help make this project the best it can be”.

 

 

MEDIA CENTRE: For press release, high-res images and video, visit: http://bit.ly/1GkmFeR

 

Websitehttp://www.popupglobe.com

Kickstarterhttp://bit.ly/popupglobe

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/PopupGlobe

Twitter: @popupglobe

 

For further information contact: 

Tobias Grant 

E: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

T: +64 21 607 277

 

About Shakespeare’s Second Globe Theatre

 

The first Globe theatre was built in 1599 and stood for only 14 years. It burned down during a performance of Shakespeare's Henry VIII, when a piece of wadding fired from a cannon set the thatched roof alight. Incredibly, all three thousand audience members apparently escaped without injury, except for one man whose flaming trousers were doused by a bottle of ale.

 

The second Globe was immediately built on the same foundations at the then vast cost of  £1,400. It thrived for almost 30 years, from 1614-1642, when the outbreak of the English Civil war forced its closure and eventual demolition some years later.

 

The design of the Pop-up Globe is rigorously based on the groundbreaking historical research undertaken by Professor Tim Fitzpatrick and Russell Emerson of Sydney University Department of Performance Studies over a five year period. 

 

This  has resulted in a new reconstruction of the probable shape and size of the second Globe Theatre that is quite different in size and shape from Shakespeare’s Globe completed in 1997 on Bankside, London.

 

Fitzpatricks research indicates that the standing space in the yard should be nearly 50% smaller than the London Globe, and the stage should have only two doors. The dimensions of the building itself are some 10% smaller than the London Globe. 

 

About Dr Miles Gregory 

 

“At long last, a director that does Shakespeare – and indeed theatre - the way it should be done” The Stage, UK  

 

“Fizzing with talent”, The Independent, UK

 

Aged twenty Miles Gregory experienced a Shakespeare performance at Shakespeare’s Globe, London for the first time. The experience changed his life. He realized his destiny would be to bring the magic of Shakespeare alive so that others can enjoy the same incredible experience that for him was so profound. 

 

Dr Gregory holds a PhD in Shakespearean performance from the University of Bristol and a Master of Fine Art in Staging Shakespeare from the University of Exeter. He is an acclaimed international director and producer of Shakespeare. Miles grew up in Auckland, New Zealand, and has returned to bring to life his dream: Pop-up Globe.

 

The idea struck him when he was reading a book about theatres with his youngest daughter. “The Globe Theatre literally popped up,” he recalls, “and my daughter asked me if we could go there. I thought long and hard, and this is the result.” 

 

Hiatus+

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.202  Friday, 24 April 2015

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, April 24, 2015

Subject:    Hiatus+

 

Dear SHAKSPER Subscribers,

 

Next web Ron Severdia will be redoing the SHAKSPER web site for smoother operations, a newer look, and better e-mail functions. So there will be no further Newsletters until installation and migration are completed. It should take about a week to complete. MY This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. address should still be working so you may keep sending in submissions.

 

In a few hours, I leave with my older daughter Melissa and son-in-law Bill for the weekend to see my younger daughter Rebecca in her final college performance (graduation May 16th) as Richard Burbage in Bill Cain’s Equivocation.

 

The Bryn Mawr College Shakespeare Performance Troupe is one of the oldest and most popular organizations at Bryn Mawr College. All in the area are invited.

 

A notice about the production is below:

 

Come see Bryn Mawr College Shakespeare Performance Troupe’s second spring production: Equivocation, by Bill Cain. Complete with a lot of Shakespeare-inspired humor, political thrilling-ness, the gunpowder plot of 1605, a Scottish king, a priest, WITCHES, sarcasm, actors playing actors playing characters and MORE! 

 

Friday, April 24th at 7:30 PM

Saturday, April 25th at 7:30 PM

All in Rhoads Dining Hall

Doors for each production open 30 minutes before curtain (7:00 Friday and Saturday)

 

Content Warning: this show features simulated hangings, a beheading, discussion of and some simulation of torture (a la 1605), and strong use of language

 

Questions? Contact Lindsey Foster at lcfoster.brynmawr.edu or Lyntana Brougham at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.