Announcements

Neema Parvini on Thurs Oct 6 + KiSS Autumn Schedule

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.330  Monday, 3 October 2016

 

From:        Timo Uotinen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 2, 2016 at 2:41:41 PM EDT

Subject:    Neema Parvini on Thurs Oct 6 + KiSS Autumn Schedule

 

Dear SHAKSPERians,

 

Here is an update on Kingston Shakespeare events:

 

KiSS: Shakespeare and New Historicist Theory with Neema Parvini, Oct 6

 

Our first session on Thursday October 6 features Dr Neema Parvini discussing his book Shakespeare and New Historicist Theory, published by Bloomsbury in Arden Shakespeare’s Shakespeare and Theory series, coming out in January 2017. In our new format, the session will be an informal roundtable discussion with the author, chaired by Richard Wilson. We will convene at 6.30 pm at the Gallery of the Rose Theatre, Kingston. These sessions are free and open to everyone. See also the event page!

About Shakespeare and New Historicist Theory (from the publisher’s website):

 

Over the past three decades, no critical movement has been more prominent in Shakespeare Studies than new historicism. And yet, it remains notoriously difficult to pin down, define and explain, let alone analyze. Shakespeare and New Historicist Theory provides a comprehensive scholarly analysis of new historicism as a development in Shakespeare studies while asking fundamental questions about its status as literary theory and its continued usefulness as a method of approaching Shakespeare’s plays.

 

Dr Neema Parvini is a Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Surrey. He is the author of three books alongside the aforementionedShakespeare and New Historicist TheoryShakespeare’s History Plays: Rethinking Historicism (Edinburgh University Press, 2012), Shakespeare and Contemporary Theory: New Historicism and Cultural Materialism (Bloomsbury, 2012), and Shakespeare and Cognition: Thinking Fast and Slow Through Character(Palgrave, 2015). Moreover, check out his fantastic podcast series on Shakespeare and Contemporary Theory. For more information see his staff page.

***

 

Kingston Shakespeare Autumn programme

Kingston Shakespeare has a new roundtable format featuring three different types of session: firstly, authors discussing their recent books; secondly, playreadings focusing on ‘Shakespeare, volume one’, three apocryphal texts; and thirdly, work-in-progress seminars with scholars discussing their recent work in and around all things Shakespeare.

 

Here is the programme for this Fall (with amendations forthcoming as soon as possible):

  • Oct. 6: Booktalk: Shakespeare and New Historicist Theory with Neema Parvini (Surrey)
  • Oct. 13: Playreading Shakespeare, volume one: Fair Em
  • Oct. 20: Work-in-Progress with Harry Newman (Royal Holloway)
  • Oct. 27: Booktalk: TBC
  • Nov. 3: Playreading Shakespeare, volume one: Mucedorus
  • Nov. 17: Work-in-Progress with Ildiko Solti
  • Nov. 24: Booktalk: TBC
  • Dec. 1: Playreading Shakespeare, volume one: The Merry Devil of Edmonton
  • Dec. 8: Work-in-Progress: TBC

All sessions are free and open to the public. They take place at our usual spot (the Gallery) in the Rose Theatre, Kingston. The sessions start at 6.30 pm unless otherwise specified.

See our homepage for more and up-to-date information. See you there!

 

Kingston Shakespeare Seminar

Homepage

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Twitter

Facebook

 

If you want on or off our email list, send us an email and we will act accordingly.

 

Timo Uotinen

PhD Candidate in English Literature

Royal Holloway, University of London

http://tinyurl.com/otqu2g5

http://royalholloway.academia.edu/TimoUotinen

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. / This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Speaking of Shakespeare with NYU's Louis Scheeder

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.329  Monday, 3 October 2016

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 2, 2016 at 12:44:32 PM EDT

Subject:    Speaking of Shakespeare with NYU's Louis Scheeder 

 

Speaking of Shakespeare 

With Louis Scheeder of NYU's 

Tisch School of the Arts 

 

Wednesday, October 5, at 8 p.m.

The National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, Manhattan

Admission Free, and Open to the Public

 

We hope you’ll join us for a wide-ranging conversation with one of America’s most influential directors and drama instructors. Louis Scheeder teaches at NYU’s prestigious Tisch School of the Arts. He founded and now oversees its Classical Studio, an advanced training program, and he also serves as Associate Dean of Faculty. During the 1970s Mr. Scheeder won plaudits as Producer of the Folger Theatre Group, a vibrant company that performed both Renaissance classics and cutting-edge contemporary works on an Elizabethan stage that became of of the most dynamic venues in the Nation’s Capital. In subsequent years he has worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford-upon-Avon and with The Factory in London, and he conducts workshops in settings such as California’s Huntington Library. He has delighted audiences with three Off Broadway shows, among them Amlin Gray’s How I Got That Story. He has contributed to a widely-admired volume about Training the American Actor. And in collaboration with our December guest, Shane Ann Younts, he has compiled All the Words on Stage: A Complete Pronunciation Dictionary for the Plays of William Shakespeare.   

 

Visit www.shakesguild.org for more details about this and a variety of other Guild offerings, among them our 2016 Gielgud Award presentation, to occur on Sunday, October 9, at London’s historic Guildhall, with Vanessa Redgrave as this year’s honoree. 

 

 

 

 

Music from Shakespeare’s Time with Collectio Musicorum

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.325  Friday, 30 September 2016

 

From:        Gene Murrow - GEMS <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 29, 2016 at 12:57:27 PM EDT

Subject:    Music from Shakespeare’s Time with Collectio Musicorum

 

Jeff Dailey has had a distinguished career as a musicologist and performer, with a keen interest in music of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.  This concert of music from Shakespeare’s time by his group Collectio Musicorum includes works that were featured in Shakespeare’s plays as well as music by Shakespeare’s friend, Thomas Morley, among others.

 

Gotham Early Music Scene, Inc. (GEMS), the service and advocacy organization for early music in New York City, is forwarding the following information to Shaksper on behalf of Collectio Musicorum.  We thank you for your attention!   

 

Gene Murrow, Executive Director

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Thursday, September 29, 2016

 

CONTACT:                                                                                                  -OR-

 

Dr. Jeff S.Dailey                                                         

Gene Murrow or Naomi Morse

Collectio Musicorum                                                   

Gotham Early Music Scene, Inc.        

917-796-6112                                                              

(212) 866 – 0468

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.                                                   

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

http://collectio-musicorum.blogspot.com/ 

 

 

Collectio Musicorum

 

MUSIC FROM SHAKESPEARE’S TIME

 

Date: Friday, October 21, 2016

Time: 8 pm

 

Location:        Christ and St. Stephen’s Church

120 West 69th Street  

New York, NY 10023

 

Cross Street:  Between Broadway and Columbus Avenue

 

Subway/Bus: #1 train to 66th Street station 

#2/3 trains to 72nd Street station

B/C trains to 72nd Street station

M5, M7, M104, M11, M20, M10, M66, or M72 buses 

 

Tickets:           Admission is free

Details online at http://collectio-musicorum-upcoming.blogspot.com/2016/09/celebrating-shakespeare.html 

 

Performers:

 

Elizabeth Bates, soprano; Patrick Fennig; countertenor, Christopher Thompson, tenor; Jeff Dailey, recorder; Christopher Morrongiello, lute; and Patricia Neely, viol

 

Description:

 

Collection Musicorum, a New York-based early music ensemble, presents a concert of music from 16th and 17th century England, commemorating the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare.  The program will feature music from Shakespeare’s plays, as well as works from the plays of Shakespeare’s contemporaries Ben Jonson and Christopher Marlowe.  In addition, the program will include Elizabethan ballads and chamber music by Shakespeare’s friend Thomas Morley and will feature rarely heard music by Nicholas Lanier, who became Master of the King’s Music after Shakespeare’s death.

 

About the ensemble:

 

Collectio Musicorum (“Collection of Music”) is an ensemble devoted to giving the best possible performances of music from the earliest of times.  While realizing it is not possible to replicate medieval performances with complete accuracy, the ensemble strives to achieve a reasonable reproduction of the sounds and performance practice of the Middle Ages by examining all available evidence—codicological, organological, linguistic, iconographic, etc.   This musicological approach is combined with the highest possible level of musicianship to present historically informed concerts that are both scholarly and entertaining.  Collectio also strives to resurrect music that, although written about, is rarely, if ever, performed.   

 

Music Director Jeff Dailey studied musicology and theatre history at NYU, where he received his PhD in 2002.  He is an active instrumentalist, musicologist, conductor, and stage director.  His publications include studies of medieval and Renaissance music and theatre, Eugene O’Neill, Beowulf, Donizetti, and Gilbert and Sullivan.  He has been president of the Greater New York Chapter of the American Musicological Society since 2008.

 

For further information or to set up an interview:

 

Call 718-745-4794 or Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Website: http://collectio-musicorum.blogspot.com/

 

###

 

 

 

Media services provided by: Gotham Early Music Scene, Inc. 340 Riverside Drive # 1-A, New York, NY  10025   www.gemsny.org

 

 

 

Podcast on Shakespeare and Posthumanist Theory

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.324  Friday, 30 September 2016

 

From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 30, 2016 at 6:29:37 AM EDT

Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and Posthumanist Theory

 

http://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/2016/09/30/shakespeare-and-contemporary-theory-28-shakespeare-and-posthumanist-theory-with-karen-raber/

 

Neema interviews Karen Raber (University of Mississippi) about her forthcoming book Shakespeare and Posthumanist Theory, part of the Arden Shakespeare and Theory series. Topics include: the difference between "The Posthuman" and posthumanism, and animals in Shakespeare. 

 

 

CFP: "Shakespeare and European Theatrical Cultures”

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.323  Friday, 30 September 2016

 

From:        Sujata Iyengar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 30, 2016 at 11:52:32 AM EDT

Subject:    CFP: "Shakespeare and European Theatrical Cultures”

 

Seminar accepted for "Shakespeare and European Theatrical Cultures: An Atomizing Text and Stage," European Shakespeare Research Association Biennial Convention University of Gdansk and the Gdansk Shakespeare Theatre, Poland, July 27-30, 2016.

 

Co-organizers: Christy Desmet and Sujata Iyengar, University of Georgia (USA)

 

Ira Aldridge, the well-known nineteenth-century African American Shakespearean actor, found it impossible to work professionally in the United States, the land of his birth, because of racial and color prejudice. He took refuge in Europe, eventually dying in Łódź, where he is buried. Aldridge crossed not only geographical but also methodological boundaries in his work, deploying what we might now call color-blind or rather color-conscious casting. His first role was Rollo, the hero of Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s Pizzaro, who was of Peruvian descent. In addition to Othello, the Shakespearean role for which he was most famous, Aldridge played in Titus Andronicus, and (perhaps) Romeo and Juliet. He sometimes played caricatured figures, such as Mungo the black servant in the afterpiece The Padlock. But he also played white characters, wearing white-face make-up to play Bertram, the title roles in Richard III and Macbeth, and Shylock in The Merchant of Venice, and adding a long white prosthetic hair-piece to play Lear (for which, as Théophile Gautier noted, he carefully and symbolically refused to whiten his hands).

 

This brief account of Aldridge’s life and work foregrounds some of the major research questions surrounding the study of race in European theatre: What are the functions of and future of white- and blackface makeup on European stages? How does the concept of race change with transatlantic or transnational movement? How are both color-blind and color-conscious casting choices complicated by a change of place? How do celebrity and star-power inflect an actor’s or character’s perceived race, ethnicity, or national affiliation in different locales and contexts?

 

Send 200-word abstracts and a 3-5 sentence author biography to both Christy Desmet (cdesmet [at ]uga.edu) and Sujata Iyengar (iyengar [at] uga.edu) by 31 January, 2017. Completed papers will be due no later than 31 May, 2017. Accepted seminar members must join ESRA, the European Shakespeare Research Association, in order to participate in the seminar.

 

Sujata Iyengar, Professor of English

Co-general editor of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

Department of English

Park Hall

University of Georgia

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Announcement: Shakespeare: explorations over time and across disciplines

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.314  Wednesday, 28 September 2016

 

From:        Angelina Wangsha <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 27, 2016 at 11:17:07 AM EDT

Subject:    Announcement: Shakespeare: explorations over time and across disciplines

 

Special issue launch

Shakespeare: explorations over time and across disciplines

 

Palgrave Communications is a multi-disciplinary open access journal publishing peer-reviewed original research across all areas of the humanities & the social sciences.

 

To mark the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, Palgrave Communications is pleased to announce the launch of a special issue on Shakespeare studies.

 

This special issue presents diverse scholarly perspectives that aim to illuminate academic thinking about Shakespeare, his writings, the social and political contexts that shaped him, as well the enduring cultural (and other) influences of his creative achievements to the present day.

 

Read all published papers in the collection: 

http://www.palgrave-journals.com/palcomms/article-collections/shakespeare

 

Additional papers will be published in this collection over the coming months – sign up for our e-alerts to remain up-to-date:

http://www.palgrave-journals.com/nams/svc/myaccount/save/ealert?list_id=338

 

About open access:

http://www.palgrave-journals.com/palcomms/about/openaccess

 

Best wishes,

Angelina Wangsha

Open Research Marketing Executive

 

 

 

 

PhD Position

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.313  Wednesday, 28 September 2016

 

From:        Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 25, 2016 at 8:49:38 AM EDT

Subject:    PhD Position

 

Dear Shakespeareans,

 

Here is a copy of PhD position at my department.

 

Doctoral position

 

Uppsala University invites applications for a doctoral position in English, specialising either in English Linguistics, English Literature, or American Literature, as funding allows. Read more about the position.

 

Full information can be found here: http://www.uu.se/en/about-uu/join-us/details/?positionId=114032&subcompany=All 

 

Our PhD students study at no charge and for four years receive a generous salary with benefits.

 

Spread the word, if you would.

 

Robert Appelbaum

Professor of English Literature

Engelska Institutionen

Uppsala Universitet

Box 527 

Uppsala, Sweden 75120

http://www.engelska.uu.se/Personal/Appelbaum

www.robertappelbaum.com

 

 

 

CFP for Shakespeare’s Things

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.304  Monday, 19 September 2016

 

From:        Brett Gamboa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 18, 2016 at 4:32:21 PM EDT

Subject:    CFP for Shakespeare’s Things

 

Shakespeare’s Things:

Agency, Materiality, and Performance

 

Co-edited by Brett Gamboa (Dartmouth College)

and Larry Switzky (University of Toronto)

 

We invite contributions for a peer-reviewed essay collection solicited by Palgrave Macmillan on the liveliness, actual or apparent sentience, and uncanny autonomy of objects in Shakespeare’s plays. The surge of new materialisms across disciplines, including thing theory, actor-network theory, speculative realism, and object-oriented ontology, opens up new possibilities for understanding the latent forcefulness of things—from stage props to statues to dead bodies to coastlines—and the social, economic, and ecological assemblages of human and non-human matter that collude in the creation of Shakespeare’s theatrical worlds.

 

We welcome essays that address this renewed focus on the potency of things through individual plays and props as well as specific subject-object relations that emerge in text and/or performance. We also encourage essays that approach Shakespeare’s plays through the cluster of recent theoretical approaches, loosely gathered under the heading of New Materialism, that propose that all matter is agential and that non-human matter exerts force with and against human agents (who can also be understood as a kind of matter). We envision the collection as a combination of historically situated analyses and readings of the plays through contemporary theoretical concerns. Essays might address the plays through one of the following cruxes:

 

--Early modern theories of matter and materiality

--Anthropomorphism and anthropocentrism

--Fetishes, gifts, and other things that function as virtual persons

--Challenges and opportunities in staging actor-object relationships

--The operation of non-human forces on and in the human

--The body politic as a combination of human and non-human actors

--Moral responsibility and motivation in assemblages of persons, objects, and forces

--Animation and the refusal to be animated as political acts

--Environmental formations (e.g. storms and geographical features) as agents

--Stagings and adaptations with puppets and other performing objects

 

Please send abstracts of 250-500 words (for essays of 5000-6000 words in length) and a brief c.v. to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. andThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by no later than November 15, 2016. Please do not hesitate to contact us with any questions about individual topics or the volume as a whole. 

 

 

 

Rhodes College: Global Early Modern Position; Brotton and Shapiro Discussion

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.303  Monday, 19 September 2016

 

From:        Newstok_Scott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 17, 2016 at 3:13:20 PM EDT

Subject:    Rhodes College: Global Early Modern Position; Brotton and Shapiro Discussion

 

Dear SHAKSPER,

 

I write to share a position announcement as well as an upcoming event.

 

The English Department at Rhodes College invites applications for an Assistant Professor of English (Tenure Track). We seek a scholar of non-Shakespearean early modern literature, with a particular focus on global and transnational approaches to the era. We would welcome additional interest in digital humanities, film studies, gender and sexuality studies, or race and ethnic studies. The 3/2 course load includes introductory through advanced offerings within the department, as well as first-year writing seminars and other general education courses. Please apply online at https://jobs.rhodes.edu/postings/1865

 

On February 22 Rhodes College will host Jerry Brotton and James Shapiro for a discussion about Judaism and Islam in early modern England. Brotton just published a brief piece in the New York Times on “England’s Forgotten Muslim History” in anticipation of his forthcoming book “The Sultan and the Queen: The Untold Story of Elizabeth and Islam.”

 

Please feel free to contact me for more information.

 

Yours sincerely,

Scott Newstok

Department of English

Rhodes College

www.rhodes.edu/newstok

 

 

 

Letterpress Printing Workshops in Leicester, England

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.302  Monday, 19 September 2016

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 17, 2016 at 9:49:15 AM EDT

Subject:    Letterpress Printing Workshops in Leicester, England

 

SHAKSPERians may be interested to hear that ...

 

The Centre for Textual Studies (CTS) at De Montfort University in Leicester, England, is offering two 2-hour hands-on letter-press printing workshops for graduate students and their tutors at 4-6pm on 2 November and 9 November 2016. The second session will build on the first and we should, in that time, be able to typeset, impose, and print at least one of Shakespeare’s Sonnets. There is no charge for the sessions, but booking a place is essential. It is possible to attend only one of the two sessions, but then you’d miss half of the total printing process.

 

A description of the sessions and pictures of previous ones are at http://cts.dmu.ac.uk/events/printing-workshops

 

Booking should be made by emailing the CTS’s Paul Brown

<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

 

Prof Gabriel Egan

Director, Centre for Textual Studies

De Montfort University http://cts.dmu.ac.uk

 

 

 

Routledge Re-Issue of Terence Hawkes’ TALKING ANIMALS

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.301  Tuesday, 13 September 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Subject:    Routledge Re-Issue of Terence Hawkes’ TALKING ANIMALS

 

I have just learned from John Drakakis that Terence Hawkes’ Talking Animals has just been re-issued by Routledge in its Routledge Revivals series. 

 

https://www.routledge.com/Routledge-Revivals-Shakespeares-Talking-Animals-1973-Language-and/Hawkes/p/book/9781138237131

 

Routledge Revivals: Shakespeare’s Talking Animals (1973)

Language and Drama in Society

By Terence Hawkes

© 1973 – Routledge

247 pages

 

 

About the Book:

 

First published in 1973, this book is about Shakespeare, language and drama. The first part introduces some common ideas of anthropology and linguistics into an area where they serve as a base for the discussion of usually literary matters. It attempts to link language to our experience of speech — examining its range, texture, and social functions. In part two, the author argues that in Elizabethan culture there was a greater investment in the complexities and demands of speech due to the widespread illiteracy of the time. It examines eight of Shakespeare’s plays, together with one of Ben Jonson’s, in light of their concern with various aspects of the role of spoken language in society.

 

 

Table of Contents:

 

Acknowledgements

Introduction

 

Part I: Language, Culture, Drama 

1 Language as Culture 

2 Gesture as Language 

3 Drama as Language 

4 Drama as Culture

 

Part II: Shakespeare 

5 Elizabethan Language, Culture, Drama 

6 Love’s Labour’s Lost: rhyme against reason 

7 Richard II: the word against the word 

8 Hamlet: the plays on words 

9 Othello, Macbeth, and Jonson’s Epicoene: the language of men 

10 King Lear and Antony and Cleopatra: the language of love 

11 The Tempest: speaking your language 

 

Part III: Conclusions – New Languages for Old 

12 Drama versus Theatre 

 

Index

 

 

 

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Make a Gift to SHAKSPER

Consider making a gift to support SHAKSPER.