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Folger Puts 80,000 Images of Literary Art Online

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.355  Thursday, 21 August 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 20, 2014 at 10:04:27 PM EDT

Subject:    Folger Puts 80,000 Images of Literary Art Online

 

http://www.openculture.com/2014/08/folgers-shakespeare-library-releases-80000-images-of-literary-art-into-the-public-domain.html

Folger Shakespeare Library Puts 80,000 Images of Literary Art Online, and They’re All Free to Use

      

Has a writer ever inspired as many adaptations and references as William Shakespeare? In the four hundred years since his death, his work has patterned much of the fabric of world literature and seen countless permutations on stage and screen. Less discussed are the visual representations of Shakespeare in fine art and illustration, but they are multitude. In one small sampling, Richard Altick notes in his extensive study Paintings from Books, that “pictures from Shakespeare accounted for about one fifth—some 2,300—of the total number of literary paintings recorded between 1760 and 1900” among British artists.

 

In the period Altick documents, a rapidly rising middle class drove a market for literary artworks, which were, “in effect, extensions of the books themselves: they were detached forms of book illustration, in which were constantly assimilated the literary and artistic tastes of the time.” These works took the form of humorous illustrations—such as the As You Like It-inspired satirical piece at the top from 1824—and much more serious representations, like the undated Currier & Ives Midsummer-Night’s Dream lithograph above. Now, thanks to the Folger Shakespeare Library, these images, and tens of thousands more from their Digital Image Collection, are available online. And they’re free to use under a CC BY-SA Creative Commons license.

 

As Head of Collection Information Services Erin Blake explains, “basically this means you can do whatever you want with Folger digital images as long as you say that they’re from the Folger, and as long a you keep the cycle of sharing going by freely sharing whatever you’re making.” The Folger’s impressive repository has been called “the world’s finest collection of Shakesperean art.” As well as traditional paintings and illustrations, it includes “dozens of costumes and props used in nineteenth-century Shakespeare productions,” such as the embroidered velvet costume above, worn by Edwin Booth as Richard III, circa 1870. You’ll also find photographs and scans of “’extra-illustrated’ books filled with inserted engravings, manuscript letters, and playbills associated with particular actors or productions; and a great variety of souvenirs, comic books, and other ephemera associated with Shakespeare and his works.”

 

In addition to illustrations and memorabilia, the Folger contains “some 200 paintings” and drawings by fine artists like “Henry Fuseli, Benjamin West, George Romney, and Thomas Nast, as well as such Elizabethan artists as George Gower and Nicholas Hilliard.” (The striking print above by Fuseli shows Macbeth’s three witches hovering over their cauldron.) Great and varied as the Folger’s collection of Shakespearean art may be, it represents only a part of their extensive holdings. You’ll also find in the Digital Images Collection images of antique bookbindings, like the 1532 volume of a work by Agrippa von Nettescheim (Heinrich Cornelius), below.

 

The collection’s enormous archive of 19th century prints is an especial treat. Just below, see a print of that tower of 18th century learning, Samuel Johnson, who, in his famous preface to an edition of the Bard’s works declared, “Shakespeare is above all writers.” All in all, the immense digital collection represents, writes The Public Domain Review, “a huge injection of some wonderful material into the open digital commons.” Already, the Folger has begun adding images to Wikimedia Commons for use free and open use in Wikipedia and elsewhere on the web. And should you somehow manage, through some voracious feat of digital consumption, to exhaust this treasure hold of images, you need not fear—they’ll be adding more and more as time goes on. 

 
 
Reed Visiting Appointment

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.354  Thursday, 21 August 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 21, 2014 at 12:21:35 PM EDT

Subject:    Reed Visiting Appointment

 

http://www.reed.edu/dean_of_faculty/facsearch/positions/visiting-appointment-in-theatre.html

Visiting Appointment in Theatre (Directing, Theatre History)

The Reed College Theatre Department invites applications for a one year visiting assistant professor appointment in theatre, to start immediately, with an emphasis in directing and theatre history. Responsibilities will include teaching five courses (Directing I, Theatre History I, Applied Collaboration Techniques, and two electives) as well as advising senior theses.  We are especially interested in scholar/practitioners who are able to teach broadly within the discipline, who are committed to teaching undergraduates in a liberal arts environment, and who will maintain an active scholarly and/or professional practice outside of Reed. Expertise in pre-twentieth century theatre history and/or non-western theatre is of particular interest. A PhD, DFA or equivalent degree is preferred, and successful college level teaching and professional experience required. Advanced graduate students who are ABD will be considered.

 

Reed College is a small, distinguished liberal arts institution committed to excellence in teaching and scholarship. Reed students are known for their outstanding intellectual engagement and creativity. Reed’s new Performing Arts Building, opened in Fall 2013, provides a vital facility for new initiatives in the performing arts and for fostering interdisciplinary opportunities across the college. Information about the department is available at http://academic.reed.edu/theatre/.

 

Electronic applications are required and must be sent as PDF (preferred) or Word attachment.  Please send a cover letter, vita, and 3 letters of recommendation to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Questions may be addressed to Peter Ksander, chair of the search committee, at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Reed College is a community that believes that cultural diversity is essential to the excellence of our academic program. In your application materials, we welcome a description of how, as a scholar, teacher, or community member, you would engage and sustain the commitment to diversity and inclusion articulated in Reed College’s diversity statement (http://www.reed.edu/diversity/).  If letters of recommendation must be sent in hard copy, please submit to Theatre Search, c/o Karin Purdy, Reed College, 3203 SE Woodstock Blvd., Portland OR 97202.

 

Deadline is rolling and consideration of applications will begin immediately.

 

An equal opportunity employer, Reed College values diversity and encourages applications from underrepresented groups. Reed College is committed to assisting all members of the Reed community in providing for their own safety and security. Information regarding campus safety, statistics and college policies is available on the Reed website at: http://www.reed.edu/community_safety/information/crime/ASR909.html

 

Deadline: Consideration of applications will begin immediately

 
 
Shakespeare 4th Folio

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.353  Thursday, 21 August 2014

 

From:        Paul Muller-Reed < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 13, 2014 at 2:11:29 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare 4th Folio

 

I am the Pres. of New England Auctions and we will be auctioning off an original 1695 4th folio of Shakespeare's Works on Sept. 30th of this year.  

 

Shakespeare, William.

 

Mr. William Shakespear’s Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. Published according to the true Original Copies. Unto which is added, Seven Plays, never before Printed in Folio: Viz. Pericles Prince of Tyre. The London Prodigal. The History of Thomas Lord Cromwel. Sir John Oldcastle Lord Cobham. The Puritan Widow. A Yorkshire Tragedy. The Tragedy of Locrine. The Fourth Edition. 

 

London: Printed for H. Herringham, E. Brewster, and R. Bentley, at the Anchor in the Exchange, the Crane in St. Pauls Church-Yard, and in Russel-Street Covent-Garden. 1685. 

 

Folio (13-1/2 x 8-1/2 inches). Engraved portrait of Shakespeare by Martin Droeshout printed on the initial leaf with Ben Jonson’s verses “To The Reader” printed below, ornamental woodcut initials. Collation: []2, A4; A-Y6; Z4; Bb-Zz6; *Aaa-*Ddd6; *Eee8; Aaa-Zzz6; Aaaa-Bbbb6; Cccc2. 458 leaves. 

 

This volume is paged in three parts: 1-272, 1-328, 1-303, with the following irregularities in pagination: in part I, the pagination 96 is followed by 99; 160 by 163; 254 by 243; and that by 254 repeated. Pages 33, 107,109,190, 191, 219, 246 are respectively misprinted 23, 109, 111, 186, 187, 221, 234. In part III: page 67 is misprinted 76. 

 

“Copies even of this edition are difficult to find in choice and pure state.” –Hazlitt, page 547.

 

 

The Silver-Mathews volume has been treated well over the years with many leaves retaining a freshness reflecting the care of ownership from the date of is printing. The leaves show a minimal evidence of handling with the exception of an occasional finger or ink smudge. An occasional stray ash has produced small holes on some leaves. An extremely skilled hand was given the task to close a few margin tears. Varying light browning and a light stain to the bottom margin sporadically affecting signatures. 

 

Paper defect H2 (affecting 1 letter) and top margins of S2, Z2, Z4 & Oo4 , tiny ash holes affecting leaves *5, B6, G4, H3, M5,  N3, N4, P2, Q, Cc2, Hh, Xx3, Ggg, Tt2, Uu5, Zz4, Ddd2, Fff2, Hhh5, Mmm6, Yyy5 (6 affecting a letter), skilled closed marginal tears to title (two – 1cm), frontispiece (3 at 2cm), *6 (2cm), B6 (1cm), P6 (1cm), Kk4 (1 cm), Kkk3 (1cm). Several later margin tears affect leaves Y3, Ee3, Ee5 & Nn4. 

 

Sincerely,

Paul Muller-Reed

New England Auctions

www.nebookauctions.com

 

 

 

 
 
PBS Shakespeare Uncovered

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.347  Tuesday, 19 August 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 17, 2014 at 8:36:51 AM EDT

Subject:    PBS Shakespeare Uncovered

 

PBS Shakespeare Uncovered can be streamed from links below:

 

The Tempest with Trevor Nunn

Hamlet with David Tennant

Richard II with Derek Jacobi

The Comedies with Joely Richardson

Henry IV & V with Jeremy Irons

 
 
Recent Additions to Lexicons of Early Modern English

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.346  Tuesday, 19 August 2014

 

From:        UTP Journals < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 18, 2014 at 10:48:39 AM EDT

Subject:    Recent Additions to Lexicons of Early Modern English

 

Recently added to Lexicons of Early Modern English

http://bit.ly/_leme

 

§  Stephen Batman, "A note of Saxon wordes" (1581)

§  Edmund Bohun, Geographical Dictionary (1693): 11,681 word-entries

§  Richard Boothby, A Brief Discovery or Description of the Most Famous Island of Madagascar (1646)

§  Thomas Dekker, O per se O (1612)

§  John Heydon, "A Chymical Dictionary" (English; 1662): 70 word-entries.

§  Gregory Martin, The New Testament of the English College of Rheims (1582)

§  Gerhard Mercator, Historia Mundi Or Mercator's Atlas (1635)

§  Guy Miège, A New Dictionary French and English, with another English and French (1677): 18,376 word-entries, 73,641 sub-entries

§  John Ogilby, Asia, the First Part (1673)

§  John Rider,  Bibliotheca Scholastica (English-Latin, 1589): 42,000 word-entries and sub-entries.

§  Richard Rowlands,  A Restitution of Decayed Intelligence in Antiquities (1605; Richard Verstegan; text replaced by an extended and analyzed version)

§  Nicholas Stone, Enchiridion of Fortification (1645)

§  John Thorie, The Theatre of the Earth (1601; place-names): 3,100 word-entries.

§  John Turner, A Book of Wines (1568)

 

Coming soon to LEME 

§  Ortus Vocabulorum (Latin-English, 1500): 25,500 word-entries.

§  Henry Hexham, A Copious English and Netherdutch Dictionary (1647): 33,000 word-entries.

 

Lexicons of Early Modern English is a growing historical database offering scholars unprecedented access to early books and manuscripts documenting the growth and development of the English language. With more than 600,000 word-entries from 184 monolingual, bilingual, and polyglot dictionaries, glossaries, and linguistic treatises, encyclopedic and other lexical works from the beginning of printing in England to 1702, as well as tools updated annually, LEME sets the standard for modern linguistic research on the English language. 

 

Use Modern Techniques to Research Early Modern English!

199 Searchable lexicons

148 Fully analyzed lexicons

664 546 Total word entries

444 971 Fully analyzed word entries

573 423 Total analyzed forms and subforms

444 972 Total analyzed forms

128 451 Total analyzed subforms

60 891 Total English modern headwords

 

LEME provides exciting opportunities for research for historians of the English language. More than a half-million word-entries devised by contemporary speakers of early modern English describe the meaning of words, and their equivalents in languages such as French, Italian, Spanish, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and other tongues encountered then in Europe, America, and Asia.

 

University of Toronto Press Journals

5201 Dufferin St., Toronto, ON, Canada M3H 5T8

Tel: (416) 667-7810 Fax: (416) 667-7881

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

www.utpjournals.com/leme

http://leme.library.utoronto.ca/

 
 
Shakespeare and the Visual Arts - Call for Papers - New Deadline

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.344  Monday, 11 August 2014

 

From:         Michele Marrapodi < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 10, 2014 at 6:02:11 PM EDT

Subject:     Shakespeare and the Visual Arts - Call for Papers - New Deadline

 

Call for Papers - New deadline

 

SHAKESPEARE AND THE VISUAL ARTS:

The Italian Influence

 

Edited by

Michele Marrapodi and Keir Elam

 

Critical investigation into the rubric of “Shakespeare and the visual arts” has generally focused on the influence exerted by the works of Shakespeare on a number of artists, painters, and sculptors in the course of the centuries. Drawing on the poetics of intertextuality, and profiting from the more recent concepts of cultural mobility and permeability between cultures in the early modern period, this volume will study instead the use or mention of Renaissance material arts and artists in Shakespeare’s oeuvre. Among the great variety of possible topics, contributors may like to consider:

 

- the impact of optics and pictorial perspective on the plays or poems;

- anamorphosis and trompe l’oeil effects on the whole range of visual representation;  

- the rhetoric of “verbal painting” in dramatic and poetic discourse; 

- the actual citation of classical and Renaissance artists;

- the legacy of iconographic topoi;

- the humanistic debate or Paragone of the Sister Arts;

- the use of emblems and emblematic language; 

- explicit and implicit ekphrasis and ekphrastic passages in the plays or poems;

- ekphrastic intertextuality, etc.

 

Contributors are invited to submit proposals by 30 September 2014 to the addresses of the editors below. They should send a one-page abstract of their proposed chapter on the relationship between the age of Shakespeare and Renaissance visual culture, including theoretical approaches to the arts in the drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Each abstract (approx. 300 words) should include the author’s name, email, affiliation, and title of the proposed contribution.

 

Prof. Michele Marrapodi

University of Palermo, Italy.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Prof. Keir Elam

University of Bologna, Italy.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
Folger Digital Editions: The Poems

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.341  Sunday, 10 August 2014

 

From:         Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 8, 2014 at 10:07:43 AM EDT

Subject:     Folger Digital Editions: The Poems

 

The Folger Digital Texts now has Shakespeare's Sonnets, Venus and Adonis, Lucrece, and The Phoenix and the Turtle

 

http://www.folgerdigitaltexts.org/?chapter=4

 
ISC 2014

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.336  Tuesday, 29 July 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Subject:    ISC

 

Dear Subscriber,

 

I leave tomorrow for London, Stratford, and then back to London.

 

This is my ISC and theater trip.

 

I will be able to edit submissions tomorrow, but then there will be an interruption for a few days until I get over jet jag and settled into the too aggressive itinerary I have set for myself.

 

Hardy

 

 
Shakespeare Magazine - New Issue

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.330  Monday, 28 July 2014

 

From:        Pat Reid < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 22, 2014 at 8:29:53 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare Magazine - New Issue

 

I wanted to let you know that the third issue of Shakespeare Magazine is now available to read online:

 

http://issuu.com/shakespearemagazine/docs/shakespeare_magazine_03

 

Highlights include The Shakespeare Guide to Brazil, Shakespeare's Cleopatra on screen, Henry IV in Washington DC and an exhibition of beautiful French Shakespeare costumes. 

 

I very much hope you enjoy the issue, and please feel free to share with anyone you feel may be interested.

 

All best wishes,

Pat Reid - Editor, Shakespeare Magazine

 

NB Shakespeare Magazine is a completely free online magazine. You don’t have to ‘Follow’ or sign up - just click or swipe to start turning the pages. 

 

Website: http://www.shakespearemagazine.com

 

Previous issues: 

 

http://issuu.com/shakespearemagazine/docs/shakespeare_magazine_01

 

http://issuu.com/shakespearemagazine/docs/shakespeare_magazine_02

 

Twitter: @UKShakespeare

 
 
Shakespeare-Themed Book Reviews and Course Adoptions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.329  Monday, 28 July 2014

 

From:        Lois Leveen < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 17, 2014 at 5:45:51 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare-Themed Book Reviews and Course Adoptions

 

Colleagues,

 

As some of you know, JULIET’S NURSE is being published by Simon & Schuster this September. It imagines the 14 years leading up to the events in Romeo and Juliet, as told from the pov of the nurse. There is much Shakespeare but also much medieval/Renaissance Italian history woven in, and I’m honored to say the audiences who’ve heard scenes from it (at Shakespeare 450 in Paris, as well as the Kalamazoo Medievalist Congress) have responded quite warmly, and Arthur Little at UCLA has already read the book and given it a lovely blurb.

 

If any of you do reviews of Shakespeare-themed works, S&S has advanced reader copies available for reviewers. You can request one from Mellony Torres < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >.

 

In addition, I know a September pub date makes it difficult to consider a book for the 2014-15 school year, but if you use contemporary fiction in any of your classes and think you might want to put JULIET’S NURSE on your syllabus, I think you should be able to request as ARC for consideration. Those requests should go to Megan Reid < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >.

 

For the rest of you, I’ll let the list know when the book is officially available this autumn.

 

-Lois Leveen

 
 
Lear and Families

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.328  Monday, 28 July 2014

 

From:        John Knapp < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 17, 2014 at 11:53:25 AM EDT

Subject:    Lear and Families

 

Readers of SHAKSPER might be interested in reading Joe Carroll’s essay, “An Evolutionary Approach to Shakespeare’s King Lear” in a recent collection of mine:  Critical Insights: Family. Ipswich, MA: Salem P, 2013: 83-103.

 

John V. Knapp,

Professor of English, Emeritus;

Editor, Style.

Department of English,

Northern Illinois University

 
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