Announcements

BSA Bulletin - April 2016

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.108  Friday, 1 April 2016

 

From:        BSA <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 1, 2016 at 7:21:45 AM EDT

Subject:    BSA Bulletin - April 2016

 

 

THE BSA BULLETIN – APRIL 2016

 

New Honorary Fellows

The British Shakespeare Association is delighted to announce that its 2016 Honorary Fellowship Awards are to be given to Emeritus Professor Ann Thompson and to Emeritus Director and Co-Founder of the RSC John Barton. The BSA will be formally honouring Ann and John at the 2016 conference in Hull in a special event, more details of which will be announced shortly. Our full notice can be found here

 

BSA exclusive competition: win a pair of tickets to the World Book Night 2016 Gala Evening at the British Library

 

Courtesy of the British Library, we’re offering BSA members the chance to win tickets to a gala evening on Saturday 23rd April, 7pm-8.30pm, marking #Shakespeare’s birthday and the 400th anniversary of his death. Cathy Rentzenbrink, author of The Last Act of Love, will introduce World Book Night authors past and present, including Matt Haig, Dreda Say Mitchell, S J Parris, Holly Bourne and Sathnam Sanghera. 

 

To enter, simply visit www . hotticketoffers . com/competition/bsaworldbooknight and enter the code BSA. The competition closes on Thu 14 April at 5pm and the winner will be notified shortly after.

 

 

Disability and Shakespearean Theatre Symposium

Registration is now open for ‘Disability and Shakespearean Theatre’, a conference supported by the BSA, taking place at the University of Glasgow on 20 April 2016. The symposium will be followed by the premier of Molly Ziegler’s new play Let Her Come In, a one-act rewriting of Hamlet focused on mental illness, gender and disability. Attendance is FREE to BSA members in good standing. For the full schedule and to register, please visit the conference website.

 

 

BSA Journal – new articles

New articles published online this month include Kavita Mudan Finn’s essay on transformative fanworks based on Shakespeare’s history plays and several new reviews of Shakespeare productions in Stratford-upon-Avon and London. Current members can subscribe to the journal – including the physical volume and full online access – at the heavily discounted price of £15. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for details and missing volumes.

BSA Event Videos

 

Our website now hosts video recordings of BSA events. Members can currently watch the inauguration of Chris Grace and Dame Janet Suzman as honorary fellows of the association, complete with their reflections on their work with Shakespeare. A taster of the recording is available to all on the website, and members in good standing for the current year have been emailed a password for the full recording.

Teaching Shakespeare issue 9 now published Issue 9 of the BSA magazine Teaching Shakespeare was published last month. This issue includes a bumper noticeboard and royally ushers in the year with two articles on the Henry IV plays by Michael J. Collins and Howard Gold. Submissions for Issue 10 can be sent to the journal editor at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Issue 9 can be downloaded from the BSA website.

 

Teaching Shakespeare: Call for contributions on Vietnamese Shakespeare

 

Dr Sarah Olive, chair of the BSA Education Committee and editor of Teaching Shakespeare, is seeking contributions focusing on Shakespeare in Vietnamese education. Anyone with experience of learning or teaching Shakespeare in Vietnam can email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to be part of this British Academy-funded project. For more information, see the full call on our website.

 

 

Preparing for Hull 2016

The BSA’s 2016 conference, ‘Shakespearean Transformations: Death, Life, and Afterlives’, takes place 8-11 September 2016 at the University of Hull. The conference will include a full education strand as well as an exciting range of concerts, performances, presentations and paper sessions. Registration for the conference will open soon, and all participants must be members of the BSA in good standing. Please visit the conference website for full details.

 

 

Bardolph’s Box: An Introduction to Shakespeare

The BSA is pleased to be supporting Up the Road Theatre's Bardolph’s Box, a theatre production designed by BSA member Nicola Pollard for children aged 8-12 and their families. This 40-minute piece, featuring a number of lesser-known plays and characters, finishes its tour of Kent and the North West in April. For more information, please see the company website.

 

 

THE BSA MEMBERS’ BULLETIN

We are pleased to advertise news and activities by our members and other Shakespeare associations. If you would like to advertise a Shakespeare-related activity, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Items below are not affiliated with or endorsed by the BSA – please use individual contact details for more information.

 

Julius Caesar actor training and performance in Sri Lanka

DUENDE & Stages Theatre Company invite you to attend ‘The Evil That We Do’, a fifteen-day, residential ensemble physical training course culminating in a public performance based on Julius Caesar, taking place in Sri Lanka in May. Fees (£350 for international visitors) include all accommodation and food. Applications are open to emerging and working performers from around the world. For more details, please visit the company website.

 

Shakespeare:Birmingham

Shakespeare:Birmingham organises weekly gatherings / Shakespeare play readings at the Birmingham & Midland Institute in the centre of Birmingham (Tuesdays, 6.30-9.00pm) and monthly workshops aimed at increasing enjoyment of Shakespeare through any means possible! We are currently reading King Lear, all are welcome to attend. For details of meetings, please visit the website at http ://shakespearebirmingham . co . uk, which also lists all Shakespeare productions happening in the area.

 

Shakespeare’s Friends and Rivals, 9 April 2016, London Metropolitan Archives

Eva Griffith leads a day of theatre history and biography based around the Red Bull playhouse and the people who lived in the area. The day includes examinations of seventeenth-century documents, an actor-led exploration of new evidence surrounding the death of Shakespeare, a conversation with actor and director Sonia Ritter, and a walking tour around Clerkenwell. For more information and to book, please visit http ://www . evagriffith . com/ .

 

Metamorphosis at Senate House Library

Senate House Library is commemorating the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death with a season of activities running from 14 April to 17 December, including a free exhibition, a programme of events and a website with digital content and research resources. Based loosely on the ‘seven ages of man’ speech from As You Like It, the season will reflect the changes in Shakespearean text and scholarship over four centuries. For full details, please visit the website.’

 

Shakespeare’s Musical Brain, 16 April 2016, King’s College London

The Musical Brain is convening a special conference to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. ‘Shakespeare’s Musical Brain’ will include talks from academics, composers and neurologists, examining the relationship between words and music in aesthetic and scientific terms, and how it affects the relationship between actor and audience then as now. A limited number of student tickets are available at £35; full price £95. See the website for full details.

 

Call for Papers: Shakespeare in Latin America

The Institute of Literature at Universidad de los Andes (Santiago, Chile) is organising an international conference that will bring together scholars around the topic of the presence of his works within the Latin American canon, either in the existing tradition of translating his plays and poems by writers, poets, and academics, or in the re-writing and adaptation for performance. Abstracts are due 22 April 2016. For more information, please visit the conference website.

 

Bard by the Beach Shakespeare Festival in Morecambe

From 22-24 April, Morecambe will be hosting a major Shakespeare festival. Events include five adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, Shakespeare Comedy Dinner Theatre, a midnight screening of Theatre of Blood, workshops on acting and stage fighting, wine tastings, music from the Haffner Orchestra celebrating orchestral Shakespeare, a night of The Bard on Broadway, a puppet version of Forbidden Planet and even a historical and artisan market. For more details, please visit the website.

 

BBC Radio Lancashire celebrates Shakespeare

On Sunday 24th April, 7.30-9.30pm, Ted Robbins is your host as the Bard’s best bits, chosen by BBC Radio Lancashire’s presenters, are performed in a unique multimedia experience. The performance will take place in Hoghton Tower’s Great Barn, a suitable surrounding for the Bard’s works as we mark the 400th anniversary of his death. Tickets are £15 per person.

 

OCR GCSE English Conference 2016 

The GCSE English Conference 2016 will be held on 6 June at Shakespeare’s Globe. All teachers working with GCSE-level students are invited to attend a day of practical workshops, discussions and networking opportunities, including a keynote conversation with Kazuo Ishiguro. There is an early booking discount for payments received before 30 April. For more information, please visit the conference website.

 

The Merchant of Venice in Venice, 27-28 July

The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust is organising a fundraising event in Venice to support its re-presentation of New Place. You are invited to attend a production of The Merchant of Venice in the Jewish ghetto (500 years old this year). Tickets (priced at £450) also include talks from Shakespeare experts and theatre practitioners, a three-course lunch at Locanda Cipriani, coffee and a drinks reception. For more information, or to reserve a place, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Call for Papers:  'Shakespeare and his contemporaries' Conference in Brazil

The 'VI Jornada de Estudos Shakespeareanos: Shakespeare e seus contemporâneos' will be held at Universidade de São Paulo (USP, São Paulo, 10-11 November 2016). Abstracts in English, Spanish or Portuguese are due 30 June 2016. For more information, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or jornadashakespeare . blogspot . com.

 

A Walk Around Shakespeare’s London

A Walk Around Shakespeare’s London is a self-guided walk that covers places that William Shakespeare lived and worked in London. Sites visited include The Theatre, The Curtain Theatre, Silver Street, Blackfriars and The Globe theatre. The website contains a downloadable route plan, or it can be used with a mobile device. The route also takes in a few other non-Shakespearean places of interest. The complete walk will take around three hours.

 

Shakespeare Documented online exhibition launched

Shakespeare Documented is a multi-institutional collaboration convened by the Folger Shakespeare Library to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. This free online exhibition constitutes the largest and most authoritative collection of primary-source materials documenting the life of William Shakespeare (1564-1616). It brings together images and descriptions of all known manuscript and print references to Shakespeare, his works, and additional references to his family, in his lifetime and shortly thereafter.

 

BBC Shakespeare Archive now available to UK schools

The BBC has recently launched the BBC Shakespeare Archive Resource. This new online resource provides schools, colleges and universities across the UK with access to hundreds of BBC television and radio broadcasts of Shakespeare’s plays, sonnets and documentaries about Shakespeare. The material includes the first British televised adaptations of Othello and Henry V, classic interviews with key Shakespearean actors including John Gielgud, Judi Dench and Laurence Olivier, and more than 1000 photographs of Shakespeare productions.

 

 

 

The Unbelievable Hamlet Discovery

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.107  Friday, 1 April 2016

 

From:        Crystal David <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 14, 2016 at 2:23:49 PM EDT

Subject:    The Unbelievable Hamlet Discovery

 

Published and available as PoD or e-book via my website. I can no longer bear to keep this discovery to myself. It is for the world. 

 

All best

David

 

I was walking through the grounds of the house where Shakespeare lived, New House, in Stratford, in a part of the garden where tourists rarely go, when I tripped and fell full length on the grass. As I lay there, I realized I could see into a broken drain, and inside it was a tiny waterproof bag, containing a manuscript. The bag was lying near the surface, dragged there, I suspect, by rats - there is evidence of chewing on some pages, and some water has got in, for some pages are discoloured. It was a previously unknown quarto edition of Hamlet, in which every word - apart from the character names - began with the letter H.

 

The text is now known to scholarship as the 'H Quarto'. . . . 

 

 

Hamlet Discovery:  pdf Hamlet Discovery text (4.18 MB)

 

 

Shakespeare in Venice - Summer School

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.092  Tuesday, 22 March 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 22, 2016 at 11:04:44 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare in Venice - Summer School

 

Deadline approaching to participate in the 2nd Shakespeare in Venice Summer School

 

The Study Centre for Documentary Research into European Theatre and Opera presents an intensive two-week course of study exploring the text and contexts of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice.

 

A rich program of lectures, workshops, excursions and guided tours held in the beautiful Island of San Giorgio Maggiore. This unique full-immersion experience will culminate in the attendance of the first production of The Merchant ever to be staged in the Jewish Ghetto, in the year of its quincentennial (1516-2016) and of Shakespeare's quatercentenary.

 

Faculty includes:

Jerry Brotton, David Bryant, Tom Cartelli, Fernando Cioni, Karin Coonrod, Tobias Döring, Paul Edmondson, Tibor Fabiny, Stephen Greenblatt, Diana Henderson, David Scott Kastan, Carol Chillington Rutter, David Schalkwyk, James Shapiro, Boika Sokolova, Stanley Wells

 

Directors: Maria Ida Biggi and Shaul Bassi

 

For information on how to participate: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Final Deadline for applications: 30th March 2016

 

 

 

REED/BBC Announcement

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.089  Monday, 21 March 2016

 

From:        Sally-Beth MacLean <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 21, 2016 at 10:05:12 AM EDT

Subject:    REED/BBC Announcement

 

ANNOUNCEMENT

 

The Records of Early English Drama (REED) project is pleased to announce the launch of a new partnership project with the BBC, the British Library and Dr Siobhan Keenan at Simon De Montfort University. The project is titled ‘Shakespeare on Tour’, involving the broadcast of over 200 stories across all BBC Local Radio stations and regional television in England and at bbc.co.uk/shakespeareontour. Shakespeare on Tour includes stories that are all linked to specific places across the country as part of a season of BBC programming to mark 400 years since Shakespeare’s death in 1616.

 

This unique and ambitious broadcasting event will uncover surprising stories about where Shakespeare’s plays were performed, along with other iconic moments such as the first black actor to perform Shakespeare on the British stage, the rise of the female star and notable Shakespearean child actors It also charts locations where Shakespeare’s acting companies performed before 1642 -- a number of which survive to this day.

 

To help bring these stories to life, the BBC has been working closely with the British Library to unearth stories from their historic collection of theatre playbills relating to Shakespeare performances across the UK, and with the Records of Early English Drama.

 

Craig Henderson, Head of Programmes, BBC English Regions, said: ‘This unique project brings together on-going academic research as well as stories of Shakespeare performances told through original playbills from the late 18th century onwards. For audiences, this will create a rich collection of stories relating to locations of performances of Shakespeare’s work, starting with his own troupe of performers, to highlights from more recent times.

 

The stories reveal familiar places from all corners of the country in a new and fascinating light, places that we might drive or walk past every day without realising their historical resonance. Audiences will be able to discover factual details about their local town halls, pubs and private houses around the country where Shakespeare’s plays were performed; how much Shakespeare’s players were paid; and the project will travel forward from the late 16th century to track other iconic moments such as the first and controversial—appearance of black and female performers on stage.?

 

The stories are now available online at bbc.co.uk/shakespeareontour (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03fcz11) where they can be enjoyed for many years to come.

 

Circulated by Sally-Beth MacLean

REED Director of Research/General Editor

 

 

 

Shakespeare’s Musical Brain Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.088  Monday, 21 March 2016

 

From:        Greg Harradine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 21, 2016 at 8:05:05 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare’s Musical Brain Conference 

 

Shakespeare’s Musical Brain Conference - April 16, King’s College London

 

Shakespeare’s Musical Brain

The Musical Brain Spring 2016 Conference, part of the Shakespeare400 Festival

In association with Shakespeare’s Globe

 

The Great Hall and Chapel, King’s College London, WC2R 2LS – Saturday 16 April 2016

 

Full programme and online booking: http://www.themusicalbrain.org/conference or call 0208 404 1327

E-flyer: http://www.themusicalbrain.org/pdf/shakespeares_musical_brain_flyer.pdf

 

Through discussion and live performance, this conference will explore the vital importance of music to Shakespeare himself and the role it played in his company’s creative processes as well as in the experience of audiences then and now.  

 

Leading actors and musicians of Shakespeare’s Globe will illustrate lectures, join in discussions, and conclude the conference with a performance of music, song and readings in the beautiful King’s College Chapel.

 

Speakers include:

 

Bill Barclay, Director of Music at Shakespeare’s Globe, exploring the Music of the Spheres, both as this relates to Shakespeare and its meaning from ancient times through to modern physics. 

 

Dr Freya Bailes, Academic Fellow in Music Psychology, Leeds University, on ‘Psychological Time-Travel: Exploring Audience Responses to Music in Shakespeare’s Theatre’.

 

Dr Simon Smith, Early Modern Music Research Associate at Shakespeare’s Globe and Extraordinary Junior Research Fellow at Queen’s College, Oxford, on ‘Early Encounters with Shakespeare’s Music: Writer, Performer and Audience in the Early Modern Playhouse’.

 

Michael Trimble, Emeritus Professor of Behavioural Neurology at the Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, on the similarities and differences in the conception and reception of words and music, and understanding their distinct and mutual importance better through the medium of Shakespeare himself.

 

Musicians of Shakespeare’s Globe, a consort of period instruments:

George Bartle, Sam Goble, Robin Jeffrey, Alastair Warren and Adrian Woodward

 

Actors: Will Mannering and Ellie Piercy

 

This event will have live subtitles, delivered by STAGETEXT.

 

Full price: £95 / Student (full-time, available on a first come first served basis): £35

 

 

 

Previewing a Venetian-Ghetto “Merchant” with Director Karin Coonrod

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.082  Tuesday, 15 March 2016

 

From:        John Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 16, 2016 at 12:28:01 PM EDT

Subject:    Previewing a Venetian-Ghetto “Merchant” with Director Karin Coonrod

 

Director Karin Coonrod

Previews the Merchant 

She's Preparing for July

In the Venetian Ghetto 

 

Monday, March 28, at 8 p.m.

National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, Manhattan

Admission Free, but Reservations Requested

 

If you read Sunday’s Travel section in the New York Times, you probably saw David Laskin’s cover story about “500 Years of Jewish Life in Venice.” You may also have noticed that in late July a special production of The Merchant of Venice will be staged in the city’s historic Ghetto. The director behind this commemorative event is Karin Coonrod, and in a recent review New York Times critic Ben Brantley described her as “a theater artist of far-reaching inventiveness.” 

 

In 2005 Vanity Fair columnist John Heilpern, writing in the New York Observer, called her rendering of Coriolanus “bold and brilliant.” Similar accolades have appeared in American Theatre, The New Yorker, Village Voice, and other periodicals. Ms. Coonrod has founded two companies, Arden Party (1987) and Compagnia de’ Colombari (2004), and she and her colleagues have enchanted playgoers in such venues as BAM, the Folger Theatre, Hartford Stage, the Public Theater, and Theatre for a New Audience

 

We hope you’ll join us for what promises to be a memorable evening, and that you’ll encourage others to do likewise. Because space is limited, we request that you reserve spaces with an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

See www.shakesguild.org/events.html and click on the blue links for additional detail, not only about this event and the context that gives rise to it, but about upcoming programs with Ralph Alan Cohen (April 18), Kiernan Ryan (May 23), and Peter Holland (June 20). You’ll also find information about other engagements, among them a festive Gielgud Award presentation that took place in October at London’s venerable Guildhall

 

John F Andrews, President

The Shakespeare Guild

1-505-988-9560

www.shakesguild.org  

 

 

 

 

CFP: Shakespeare and Fear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.079   Monday, 14 March 2016

 

From:        Yan Brailowsky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 10, 2016 at 5:26:54 AM EST

Subject:    CFP: Shakespeare and Fear

 

Shakespeare and Fear

 

Call for papers for the 2017 conference of the French Shakespeare Society

 

12-14 January 2017

Fondation Deutsch de la Meurthe, Cité Internationale Universitaire de Paris

 

 

Call for papers

 

In an era fraught with economic violence, environmental anxiety, forced migrations, war and terrorism, it seems particularly relevant to examine the ways in which the Elizabethan and Jacobean stage made use of fear and to consider how these fears continue to reverberate in the present. Such connections are clearly envisaged by Robert Appelbaum, who applies the word “terrorism” to the violence that shook Early Modern Europe, including the St. Bartholomew’s Day massacre and countless plots and popular uprisings.* The re-appropriation of Shakespeare’s plays in the context of the crises we are experiencing is a case in point. How has Shakespeare been used to fend off fear, or deconstruct the workings of terror, dictatorship or armed intimidation — from Ernst Lubitsch’s To be or not to be to Shakespeare productions recently performed in Syria?

 

Fear is present in one form or another in almost all of the dramatic works of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. From the ridiculous apprehension of being made a cuckold to the dread felt by Macbeth when confronted to Banquo’s ghost, from the mechanicals’ worry that the “lion” might frighten the ladies to the terror on which Richard III’s tyranny relies, all degrees of fear are to be found in Shakespeare, as well as in Marlowe, Middleton or Webster. Be it in tragedies attempting to instil sacred terror or in comedies making fun of the staging of terrifying events, in historical plays critiquing the Machiavellian uses of political terror or in the new-fangled Jacobean taste for spectacular stage shows, fear is pervasive on the Shakespearean stage, reflecting individual emotions such as  “the dread of something after death” mentioned by Hamlet, as much as the ever-present social apprehension of the plague or foreign invasions. Shakespeare, for one, distinguishes fear (which occurs over 800 occurrences in the canon) from dread (50 occurrences) or fright, which is often to be found in ironic contexts, with an underlying suggestion that the events in question are not really worth the fretting they cause.

 

The notion of fear in connection with Shakespeare goes well beyond the modalities specific to the Early Modern English stage: the fact that the Bard’s works have been canonised and become compulsory reading  at school and university has generated a fear of Shakespeare, while the arrival of his plays on the continental stages in the 18th century spawned trepidation among audiences and authors alike: there is certainly a form of fear in Voltaire’s loathing of, as much as in the Romantic playwrights’ desire to emulate, the master. This lasting dread is epitomized today under the alliterative heading of “no fear Shakespeare” and in the various attempts to domesticate the intricacies of Elizabethan writing with the help of reading companions, modernized editions, etc. The fear of Shakespeare can also become a fear for Shakespeare, in view of the endless probes and conspiracy plots around his identity that has arisen since the end of the 19th century.

 

* Terrorism Before the Letter, Mythography and Political Violence in England, Scotland, and France 1559-1642, OUP, 2015.

 

We look forward to bringing together historians, literary scholars and theatre practitioners, as well as specialists in drama, cultural studies, psychoanalysis, sociology and anthropology to offer contributions on topics including (but not limited to):

  • Theories of/about fear in Early Modern England;
  • The different degrees of fear in Early Modern England;
  • Symptoms of fear on the Early Modern stage (body language, vocal language, masks, costumes, makeup, etc.) / a phenomenology of fear;
  • What and who is feared on the Shakespearean stage? (terrifying portents, threats, exemplary sentences, horrible and horrifying shows, mutilations and murders, ghosts, supernatural interventions, etc);
  • How and why is fear elicited in audience members? (staging tricks, noises, smoke, visions, etc.);
  • The fear of Shakespeare / “No fear Shakespeare”;
  • Fear for Shakespeare;
  • Updating Shakespeare in the context of war, terror or terrorism;
  • Invoking Shakespeare to allay fear.

Please send an abstract (maximum 500 words) and a short biography (maximum 200 words) by 25 may 2016 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Scientific committee

  • Yan Brailowsky (Université Paris Ouest, Société Française Shakespeare)
  • Mark Burnett (Queen’s University, Belfast)
  • Jean-Michel Déprats (Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense)
  • Pascale Drouet (Université de Poitiers)
  • Dominique Goy-Blanquet (Université de Picardie)
  • Sarah Hatchuel (Université du Havre, Société Française Shakespeare)
  • Pierre Kapitaniak (Université Paris VIII)
  • Harry Keyishian (Fairleigh Dickinson University)
  • Sophie Lemercier-Goddard (ENS Lyon)
  • Ronan Ludot-Vlasak (Université de Lille III)
  • Chantal Schütz (École Polytechnique, Société Française Shakespeare)
  • Nathalie Vienne-Guerrin (IRCL / Université Paul-Valéry – Montpellier III, Société Française Shakespeare).

 

For more information: http://shakespeare.revues.org/3630 

 

 

 

British Shakespeare Association - March Bulletin

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.076   Thursday, 3 March 2016

 

From:        BSA <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 1, 2016 at 1:20:56 PM EST

Subject:    British Shakespeare Association - March Bulletin

 

BSA Event Videos

 

Our website is now capable of hosting video recordings of BSA events. Members can currently watch the inauguration of Chris Grace and Dame Janet Suzman as honorary fellows of the association, complete with their reflections on their work with Shakespeare. A taster of the recording is available to all on the website, and members in good standing for the current year have been emailed a password for the full recording.

 

Teaching Shakespeare issue 9 now published

 

Issue 9 of the BSA magazine Teaching Shakespeare has just been published. This issue includes a bumper noticeboard and royally ushers in the year with two articles on the Henry IV plays by Michael J. Collins and Howard Gold. Submissions for Issue 10 can be sent to the journal editor at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Issue 9 can be downloaded from the BSA website.

 

Teaching Shakespeare: Call for contributions on Vietnamese Shakespeare

 

Dr Sarah Olive, chair of the BSA Education Committee and editor of Teaching Shakespeare, is seeking contributions focusing on Shakespeare in Vietnamese education. Anyone with experience of learning or teaching Shakespeare in Vietnam can email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to be part of this British Academy-funded project. For more information, see the full call on our website.

 

BSA Journal Volume 11 now published

 

Volume 11 of the BSA journal Shakespeare is now out, including special issues on ‘Adaptation and Early Modern Culture: Shakespeare and Beyond’, and ‘“Roaring Girls: The Royal Shakespeare Company’s 2014 Season’ as well as two open issues with a wide range of articles, critical debates and performance reviews.

 

New articles published online this month include Elizabeth Harper’s article on killing children in Shakespeare’s early histories, James O’Rourke’s essay on ethnic stereotypes in productions by Trevor Nunn and Dave Chappelle, and several new book and theatre reviews. Current members can subscribe to the journal – including the physical volume and full online access – at the heavily discounted price of £15. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for details and missing volumes.

 

Preparing for Hull 2016

 

The BSA’s 2016 conference, ‘Shakespearean Transformations: Death, Life, and Afterlives’, takes place 8-11 September 2016 at the University of Hull. The conference team has received abstracts from all around the world and is currently in the process of confirming the programme and contacting participants. Hull has recently been named one of the ‘Top Ten Cities in the World to visit in 2016’ by Rough Guides. Please visit the conference website for full details.

 

Disability and Shakespearean Theatre Symposium

 

The BSA is supporting this conference, taking place at the University of Glasgow on 20 April 2016. Professor Chris Mounsey will deliver a keynote on ‘VariAbility in Shakespeare’, and the symposium will be followed by the premier of Molly Ziegler’s new play Let Her Come In, a one-act rewriting of Hamlet focused on mental illness, gender and disability. Attendance is FREE to BSA members in good standing. For more information, please visit the conference website.

 

Applying for funding

 

The BSA is able to award small amounts of money to Shakespeare-related education events, academic conferences and other activities taking place in the UK. For more information or to apply for funding, please email the Chair of the Events Committee, Susan Anderson (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or the Chair of the Education Committee, Sarah Olive (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

 

Bardolph’s Box: An Introduction to Shakespeare

 

The BSA is pleased to be supporting Up the Road Theatre's Bardolph’s Box, a theatre production designed by BSA member Nicola Pollard for children aged 8-12 and their families. This 40-minute piece, featuring a number of lesser-known plays and characters, will be touring schools and libraries in the Liverpool and Kent areas in March. For more information, please see the company website.

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THE BSA MEMBERS’ BULLETIN

We are pleased to advertise news and activities by our members and other Shakespeare associations. If you would like to advertise a Shakespeare-related activity, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Items below are not affiliated with or endorsed by the BSA – please use individual contact details for more information.

 

Death on the Shakespearean Stage: Call for Papers

 

Globe Education is marking the 400th anniversary of the deaths of Shakespeare, Francis Beaumont, Philip Henslowe and Miguel de Cervantes with an international conference running 1-3 December 2016 that explores death, rituals of dying and the experience of loss on the early modern stage. Please submit proposals of 150 words to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 1 March 2016.

 

Follow the Ardingley Shakespeare conference on Twitter 

 

Ardingly College is holding its annual Shakespeare conference on 7 March.  As well as featuring presentations by teachers and students from sixteen schools, this year’s conference will feature plenary talks by scholars Tiffany Stern, David Schalkwyk and Russ McDonald, and actor Pippa Nixon. The conference will be broadcast at @ardinglyenglish #ardinglyshakespeare . For more information, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .  

 

Margaret of Anjou: a ‘new’ play by Shakespeare

 

To mark International Women’s Day on 8 March 2016, Royal Holloway stages ‘the premiere of Shakespeare’s most feminist play’ at its Egham campus. Elizabeth Schafer and Philippa Kelly have pirated Margaret of Anjou from Shakespeare’s Henry VI and Richard III, tracing Margaret as she matures from feisty princess to scheming queen, cold-blooded killer to grief-stricken mother, shameless adulteress to cursing crone. The event is free, but please register here

 

The Woman Hater (Edward’s Boys) on tour in March

 

The acclaimed children’s company Edward’s Boys (of King Edward VI School in Stratford-upon-Avon) tours a new production of Francis Beaumont’s The Woman Hater to Stratford, Oxford and London from 9-12 March. For tickets and more information about the company, please visit its website at http ://www . edwardsboys . org/ .

 

Sidelights on Shakespeare 

 

The University of Warwick ‘Sidelights on Shakespeare’ series continues on 10 March 2016 with a talk by Dr Velda Elliott entitled ‘Detecting the Dane: Shoehorning Shakespeare into Genre Studies in A Level Literature’. This talk may particularly appeal to members working with A-level students. More details of the talk can be found here.

Shakespeare 400 Events at King’s College London 

 

Shakespeare 400 events at King’s College London in March include the Beaumont 400 conference (March 12th) and a lecture entitled In Nature’s History More Science: Forbidden Planet (March 16th). For full information about the Shakespeare 400 festival and more upcoming events, please visit the website.

Propose a Research-in-Action Workshop at Shakespeare’s Globe

 

Shakespeare’s Globe invites scholars to apply to run practice-led research workshops in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse in Spring and Summer 2016. This is an opportunity to test an idea related to the drama of Shakespeare or his contemporaries in performance indoors. Full information is available on the Globe website, and proposals should be emailed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by Monday 14 March. 

 

The Bard in Bury

 

The Theatre Royal Bury St. Edmunds is hosting its very own Shakespeare festival for schools .  Students aged 8-16 are invited to be part of a special production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream in front of a paying audience. For further details on how your school can take part, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 01284 829935. Schools will need to sign up by the end of March in order to participate.

 

Shakespeare’s Musical Brain, 16 April 2016, King’s College London

 

The Musical Brain is convening a special conference to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. ‘Shakespeare’s Musical Brain’ will include talks from academics, composers and neurologists, examining the relationship between words and music in aesthetic and scientific terms, and how it affects the relationship between actor and audience then as now. A limited number of student tickets are available at £35; full price £95. See the website for full details.

 

Call for Papers: Shakespeare in Latin America 

 

The Institute of Literature at Universidad de los Andes (Santiago, Chile) is organising an international conference that will bring together scholars around the topic of the presence of his works within the Latin American canon, either in the existing tradition of translating his plays and poems by writers, poets, and academics, or in the re-writing and adaptation for performance. Abstracts are due 22 April 2016. For more information, please visit the conference website.

Bard by the Beach Shakespeare Festival in Morecambe

 

From 22-24 April, Morecambe will be hosting a major Shakespeare festival. Events include five adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, Shakespeare Comedy Dinner Theatre, a midnight screening of Theatre of Blood, workshops on acting and stage fighting, wine tastings, music from the Haffner Orchestra celebrating orchestral Shakespeare, a night of The Bard on Broadway, a puppet version of Forbidden Planet and even a historical and artisan market. For more details, please visit the website

 

The Merchant of Venice in Venice, 27-28 July

 

The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust is organising a fundraising event in Venice to support its re-presentation of New Place. You are invited to attend a production of The Merchant of Venice in the Jewish ghetto (500 years old this year). Tickets (priced at £450) also include talks from Shakespeare experts and theatre practitioners, a three-course lunch at Locanda Cipriani, coffee and a drinks reception. For more information, or to reserve a place, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Shakespeare Documented online exhibition launched

 

Shakespeare Documented is a multi-institutional collaboration convened by the Folger Shakespeare Library to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. This free online exhibition constitutes the largest and most authoritative collection of primary-source materials documenting the life of William Shakespeare (1564-1616). It brings together images and descriptions of all known manuscript and print references to Shakespeare, his works, and additional references to his family, in his lifetime and shortly thereafter.

 

BBC Shakespeare Archive now available to UK schools

The BBC has recently launched the BBC Shakespeare Archive Resource. This new online resource provides schools, colleges and universities across the UK with access to hundreds of BBC television and radio broadcasts of Shakespeare’s plays, sonnets and documentaries about Shakespeare. The material includes the first British televised adaptations of Othello and Henry V, classic interviews with key Shakespearean actors including John Gielgud, Judi Dench and Laurence Olivier, and more than 1000 photographs of Shakespeare productions.

 

New Book by BSA Member

 

Why Shakespeare?  Who is this Hamlet? Is Lady Macbeth really evil? Can Caliban really be a twitchy speeded Goth freak? These and many more questions are addressed by BSA member Ruby Jand in her book Shakespeare Calling, a personal journey of exploration into the plays of Shakespeare and the search for an explanation of what a 450 year-old playwright from Stratford-upon-Avon means to us today.

 

RSC Resources for Schools

 

The Royal Shakespeare Company has released a new set of school resources to accompany its current UK tour of A Midsummer Night’s Dream: A Play for the Nation, which features local amateur companies taking the roles of the Mechanicals. Resources and information about events can be downloaded from the RSC website.

 

Shakespeare:Birmingham

 

Shakespeare:Birmingham organises weekly gatherings / Shakespeare play readings at the Birmingham & Midland Institute in the centre of Birmingham (Tuesdays, 6.30-9.00pm) and monthly workshops aimed at increasing enjoyment of Shakespeare through any means possible! In March we will be starting our reading of King Lear, all are welcome to attend. For details of meetings, please visit the website at http ://shakespearebirmingham . co . uk, which also lists all Shakespeare productions happening in the area.

 

 

 

Shakespeare400 at Chichester Festival Theatre

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.075   Thursday, 3 March 2016

 

From:        Duncan Salkeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 1, 2016 at 9:12:00 AM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare400 at Chichester Festival Theatre

 

CFP, Deadline Friday 25 March 2016.

 

Shakespeare400 at Chichester Festival Theatre, Sat 23 April 2016. 

 

In partnership with the University of Chichester English department, CFT will host a series of lectures and discussions devoted to bringing the latest scholarship in Shakespeare studies to Chichester. Featuring talks and interviews with leading Shakespeare scholars and theatre professionals the day will mark the anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. The day will explore the context for Shakespeare’s writing and new ways of approaching his plays. Heather Knight, senior archaeologist at the Museum of London, will be offering the latest findings about the early theatres from current excavations in London. Professor Simon Palfrey (Oxford University) will also be talking about his most recent work on Macbeth. More talks and workshops will be announced at a later date. Tickets £20 (includes 11am panel discussion in the Minerva Theatre. Short 20 minute papers are invited on any topic relating to Shakespeare and his context. 

 

Please email a 250 word abstract of your paper to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than Friday 25 March 2016.

 

Duncan Salkeld

 

 

 

Next Week

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.074   Thursday, 3 March 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, March 3, 2016

Subject:    Next Week

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

I am going to be in Devon at Sharpham House for the first module of the Committed Practioners’ Programme that I will be taking over the next two years.

 

This is a teaching module, so I will have Internet access and might have the time to edit SHAKSPER Newsletters. 

 

Should I not, this message stands as my explanation.

 

Best wishes,

Hardy

 

 

 

SBReview_26: Shakespeare’s Verse: A User’s Manual

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.070   Monday, 29 February 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Monday, 29 February 2016

Subject:    SBReview_26: Shakespeare’s Verse: A User’s Manual

 

[Editor’s Note: All SBReviews are peer-reviewed and are archived at the SHAKSPER web site’s Scholarly Resources section: http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/book-reviews in book-quality PDF files.]

 

 

SBReview_26:

 

Roger Gross. Shakespeare’s Verse: A User’s Manual. Fayetteville, AR: Pen-L Publishing, 2015. Hardcover ISBN-13: 978-1942428220, paperback ISBN-13 978-1942428046. xix + 189 pp. $32.95/22.95 US.

 

Reviewed by Annalisa Castaldo

Widener University

 

There have been, of course, books about Shakespeare’s verse, most notably George Wright’s 1991 Shakespeare’s Metrical Art. But Gross’s book is both unique and indispensable. It is unique because it is exactly what the subtitle promises—a true user’s manual. It is indispensable because it is a well-tested, comprehensive, and above all clear user’s handbook. It takes anyone—student, actor, director, scholar, or casual reader—from the very basics of the blank verse line to the complex nuances of late Shakespearean experiments with verse, and it does all this with copious examples and practice opportunities.

 

Gross begins his text talking about how, when he was the Artistic Director of the California Shakespeare Festival, he would receive raves from critics, except they always accused him of “massacring the verse” but they could never explain what exactly “respecting the verse” meant. So he set about trying to figure this out for himself. He then spent forty years reading modern and early modern sources about verse speaking, scanning every line Shakespeare wrote, testing the understanding of verse in productions, and listening to the verse in range of context (among other things). Gross is therefore uniquely qualified to not only explain the nuances of speaking Shakespeare’s lines as verse, but to providing practical, tested examples for students, actors, and directors to study and practice.

 

The book moves from the very basics—a definition of iambic pentameter—to variations to the basic form, to thoughtful engagement with how changes in pronunciation often lead accidentally change the rhythm. Gross has, for example, an entire section on “modern speech quirks” such as always wanting to emphasize (or as he puts it “kick the hell out of”) the word “not” wherever it shows up, or the fact that “able” words in Shakespeare are often pronounced differently than our normal speech patterns, so that we say “MIZ-uhr-uh-bull” for miserable when Shakespeare wrote it expecting the actor to say “MIZ-uh-RUH-bull.” Gross covers caesura and enjambment, dialect and even a bit of rhetoric, providing a complete course in verse speaking. Throughout he asks us to trust Shakespeare, to do the work of scanning any line we plan to speak and then speaking it in a way that honors the pattern of the line, even if it goes against modern American speech patterns. Doing this, he promises, will result in clearer, faster, more interesting productions.

 

Some scholars may find the relative lack of jargon to be off-putting: Gross goes so far as to rename certain poetic forms, such as calling the trochee followed by an iamb a “swoop” for example, and some of his terms seem, at first, overly cute (calling the modern habit of tossing away some syllables by compressing them “the diddley menace”). But his purpose in these moments is clear; he is trying to help actors and directors, especially, understand how changes to a regular (or “stock” as he calls it) line of iambic pentameter should sound on stage and how they will, if delivered correctly, engage the audience. Knowing that an inverted iamb is called a trochee is less important to Gross than knowing that it results in a specific burst of energy “Think of the inversion not as one reversed foot but as a four syllable movement which starts high, plunges down into the depths, and Swoops back up to the heights again” (27). Even if that imagery doesn’t end up working for the reader in the end, it clearly expresses how the verse moves in that moment.

 

Finally, Gross expands the discussion beyond the bounds of the book; he ends with an invitation for everyone to visit www.ShakespearesVerse-UsersManual.com where he plans to have demos, coaching, clarification of some points that are hard to convey in text alone and, most importantly, an ongoing conversation about verse speaking. The website is basic at the moment—just information about the book, the author, and a way to contact him, but hopefully soon there will be many discussions about the finer points of the verse. This website is a wonderful addition to the book itself, especially if the promised demos show up, as hearing a variety of lines spoken with correct rhythm would be a powerful teaching tool and a very useful addition for actors (and even scholars) who learn better from hearing or doing than from reading.

 

 

 

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