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CFP: “Transformative Literacies”

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0453  Monday, 12 November 2012

 

From:        Emily Russell < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 8, 2012 5:04:42 PM EST

Subject:     CFP: “Transformative Literacies” 

 

“Transformative Literacies”

A Medieval and Early Modern Studies Interdisciplinary Conference

University of Maryland, College Park – April 19th-20th, 2013

 

The Graduate Field Committee in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of Maryland invites submissions that explore the topic of “Transformative Literacies” for a graduate student-faculty conference that will be held April 19th-20th, 2013, at the University of Maryland, College Park. This two-day interdisciplinary conference aims to foster insightful and vigorous conversation on this topic through an innovative format that includes paper panels, roundtables, and plenary sessions (TBA). 

 

The Committee seeks submissions that explore the ways in which written and visual materials transformed the medieval and early modern world.  Suggestions for related topics include but are not limited to:  the creation, collection, and use of illuminated manuscripts; the history of the book; the history of the printing press and various printing techniques; technological advances related to literacy; the role of the print, both as a textual illustration and as a work of art; collecting practices for books and printed materials; the role and legacy of works of medieval and early modern literature; the influence of classical literary sources; access to literary and visual sources; the impact of theatrical performances; the role of literary institutions, including universities, libraries, and monasteries; the significance of written and visual materials in matters of religion and politics; textual and visual sources as propaganda; literacies in the non-Western world; myths about literacy; and the relationship between gender and literacies.

 

We invite participants from all disciplines who specialize in the medieval and early modern periods, and we especially encourage submissions from scholars in non-Western fields and those who engage the concept of literacy in new and creative ways.

 

Please send abstracts via email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it no later than Monday, December 31, 2012.  For 15-20-minute papers, please send a 300-word titled abstract; for a complete 3-4-person panel, please send an overall title and individual 300-word titled abstracts for each paper.  Please indicate “Transformative Literacies 2013” in your subject line and include an e-mail address and a telephone number at which you may be reached.  Be sure to note in your email any expected audio-visual needs (including special software needs).

 

Emily Russell

The George Washington University

Assistant to the Director, MEMSI

 
 
Speaking of Shakespeare with Nagle Jackson and James Shapiro

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0451  Thursday, 8 November 2012

 

From:        John F Andrews < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 7, 2012 7:01:00 PM EST

Subject:     Speaking of Shakespeare with Nagle Jackson and James Shapiro

 

Speaking of Shakespeare

 

After memorable conversations in September with JOHN LAHR, senior theatre critic for the New Yorker magazine, and in October with Hunter College’s IRENE DASH, the Shakespeare Guild is pleased to remind you about two upcoming programs that will continue its focus on the classical tradition in the dramatic arts.

___________________

 

A Conversation with Director Nagle Jackson

    

Monday, November 19, at 7:30 p.m.   

National Arts Club, 15 Gramercy Park South 

No Charge, but Reservations Requested

 

Not only has he earned acclaim on Broadway, at the Kennedy Center, and in other settings around the nation; NAGLE JACKSON was the first American to be invited to direct in the Soviet Union. As a producer he has enjoyed lengthy artistic directorships at the Milwaukee Repertory Theatre (1970-76) and at Princeton’s McCarter Theatre (1979-90), which has been recognized with a regional-theatre Tony Award. He has seven productions to his credit at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, along with shows in such settings as the Hartford Stage Company, the Seattle Repertory Company, San Diego’s Old Globe Theatre, and San Francisco’s American Conservatory Theatre. Mr. Jackson is also a dramatist and actor, and his many Bardic roles have included Autolycus (The Winter’s Tale), Bertram (All’s Well That Ends Well), Demetrius (A Midsummer Night’s Dream), Feste (Twelfth Night), Lucio (Measure for Measure), and Octavius (Antony and Cleopatra).

___________________

 

James Shapiro’s BBC Series on Shakespeare

    

Monday, December 17, at 7:30 p.m.    

National Arts Club, 15 Gramercy Park South 

No Charge, but Reservations Requested

 

As the author of such award-winning volumes as Shakespeare and the Jews (1996), Oberammergau (2000), 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare (2005), and Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare? (2010), Columbia University’s JAMES SHAPIRO has established himself as one of today’s most prominent scholars and reviewers, with frequent appearances on the Charlie Rose Show and other television and radio programs, and with numerous articles in periodicals such as the New York Times. On this occasion he’ll preview a riveting segment from his latest endeavor, a three-hour BBC documentary, The King and the Playwright, which has been shortlisted for a major TV award in the UK. After Mr. Shapiro screens his fascinating account of the 1605 Gunpowder Plot against James I and his court, and its impact on the chief dramatist for the theatrical company that profited from the monarch’s own patronage, he and the Guild’s John Andrews will join the audience for an engaging discussion of the episode.

___________________

 

Looking ahead, we’ll soon be announcing details about a special GIELGUD AWARD gala to take place on Sunday, April 14, at the GIELGUD THEATRE in London. This benefit will feature many of the luminaries who graced our April 2004 GIELGUD CENTENARY GALA, which occurred in the same venue and was co-sponsored by the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art.

 

For additional information about these and other offerings, as well as about membership in The Shakespeare Guild, visit the website below or contact

 

John F. Andrews

The Shakespeare Guild

5B Calle San Martin       

Santa Fe, NM 87506

Phone 505 988 9560 

www.shakesguild.org 

 
Shakespeare 450: Call for Program Proposals

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0426  Monday, 22 October 2012

 

From:        Yan Brailowsky < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 20, 2012 7:40:30 AM EDT

Subject:     Shakespeare 450: Call for Program Proposals

 

SHAKESPEARE 450: Call for Program Proposals

21-27 April 2014, Paris

 

The Société française Shakespeare is organizing in Paris a week-long conference from 21-27 April 2014 to coincide with the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth. The program will include plenary lectures, roundtables, workshops, seminars, panels, along with performances at various venues, theatres, concert halls, museums, libraries, artists’ studios and bookshops.

 

The conference is backed by a large number of French and international institutions and organizations.

 

The international organizing committee welcomes seminar, workshop or panel proposals on all aspects of Shakespeare’s works, their reflections in painting, sculpture, opera, on radio and screen, as well as issues of performance, critical theory, poetics, commemorations, textual and scenic rewritings, translation, biography.

 

For 2014, panel proposals will welcome up to four papers per session. Panels may extend for more than one session. Workshop and seminar/roundtable proposals may include more participants; it is up to the organizers to determine their precise form (open discussion, position papers followed by a roundtable discussion, etc.).

 

Panel, seminar and workshop proposals should include:

 

- name and university affiliation of proposed leader(s);

- title of panel, seminar or workshop;

- a 500–750 word description stating topic, relevance and approach;

- a 5-line bio of each seminar leader including their email address(es).

 

Please send your proposals by 10 December 2012 to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

For more information, see: 

http://www.shakespeareanniversary.org/?Shakespeare-450-Call-for-Program

 

See also CFP attached: icon Shakespeare 450 (74.61 kB)

 
Book Announcement: Performing Early Modern Drama Today

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0420  Friday, 19 October 2012

 

From:        Kathryn Prince < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 19, 2012 11:16:48 AM EDT

Subject:     Book Announcement: Performing Early Modern Drama Today

 

Pascale Aebischer and I are very pleased to announce the publication of our edited collection Performing Early Modern Drama Today. I thought that it might be of interest to SHAKESPER readers, so here is the blurb along with a link to some sample material and the table of contents.

 

While much attention has been devoted to performances of Shakespeare’s plays today, little has been focused on modern productions of the plays of his contemporaries, such as Marlowe, Webster and Jonson. Performing Early Modern Drama Today offers an overview of early modern performance, featuring chapters by academics, teachers and practitioners, incorporating a variety of approaches. The book examines modern performances in both Britain and America and includes interviews with influential directors, close analysis of particular stage and screen adaptations and detailed appendices of professional and amateur productions. Chapters examine intellectual and practical opportunities to analyse what is at stake when the plays of Shakespeare’s contemporaries are performed by ours. Whether experimenting with original performance practices or contemporary theatrical and cinematic ones, productions of early modern drama offer an inspiring, sometimes unusual, always interesting perspective on the plays they interpret for modern audiences.

 

http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item6860640/?site_locale=en_GB

 

Best regards, and thanks for reading . . . 

Kathryn Prince

Département de théâtre / Department of Theatre

Université d'Ottawa / University of Ottawa

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
Speaking of Shakespeare with Irene Dash, Nagle Jackson, and James Shapiro

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0412  Monday, 15 October 2012

 

From:        John F Andrews < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 15, 2012 10:20:26 AM EDT

Subject:     Speaking of Shakespeare with Irene Dash, Nagle Jackson, and James Shapiro

 

Speaking of Shakespeare

 

After a memorable conversation on Monday, September 17, with JOHN LAHR, senior theatre critic for the New Yorker magazine, The Shakespeare Guild is pleased to announce three upcoming programs that will continue its focus on the classical tradition in the dramatic arts.

 

On Monday, October 22, we’ll enjoy a fresh look at Shakespeare and the American Musical with Hunter College’s IRENE DASH, a scholar who has given us pioneering studies of gender roles in early-modern culture. 

 

On Monday, November 19, we’ll talk with NAGLE JACKSON, an actor, director, and playwright who has earned renown for his work on Broadway, at the Kennedy Center, and in such settings as the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and Princeton’s McCarter Theatre.

 

On Monday, December 17, we’ll be treated to a preview of The King and the Playwright, a new BBC documentary for which Columbia University’s JAMES SHAPIRO has been nominated to receive a major television award in the United Kingdom.

 

All three gatherings are open to the public and free of charge and will commence at 7:30 p.m. at the NATIONAL ARTS CLUB (15 Gramercy Park South) in Manhattan.   

 

Looking ahead, we’ll soon be announcing plans for a special GIELGUD AWARD gala to take place on Sunday, April 14, at the GIELGUD THEATRE in London. This 90-minute benefit will feature many of the luminaries who participated in the Guild’s April 2004 GIELGUD CENTENARY GALA, which occurred in the same venue and which was co-sponsored by the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. Our April 2013 presentation will honor three eminent artists, and it will pay tribute not only to the legacy of Sir John but to that of the playwright he did so much to keep vibrant for modern audiences.

___________________

Shakespeare and the American Musical

    

Monday, October 22, at 7:30 p.m.   

National Arts Club, 15 Gramercy Park South 

No Charge, but Reservations Advised

 

Have you ever wondered how a poet whose 450th birthday is less than two years away continues to supply material for films, TV screenplays, Broadway hits, and other forms of popular entertainment? If so, you’ll want to join us for a chat with Hunter College’s IRENE DASH, who’ll talk about Shakespeare and the American Musical, copies of which will be on hand for purchase and inscription. Russell Jackson, a consultant for several of Kenneth Branagh’s cinemas, has praised Professor Dash’s new book for its “lively and expert understanding of the theatrical medium” and for its “thorough and scholarly” grounding in plays that have inspired classics like Kiss Me, Kate and West Side Story. A pioneer in early-modern gender studies, Irene Dash is widely admired for such groundbreaking volumes as Wooing, Wedding, and Power: Women in Shakespeare’s Plays (1981) and Women’s Worlds in Shakespeare’s Plays (1997). 

___________________

A Conversation with Director Nagle Jackson

    

Monday, November 19, at 7:30 p.m.   

National Arts Club, 15 Gramercy Park South 

No Charge, but Reservations Advised

 

Not only has he earned acclaim on Broadway, at the Kennedy Center, and in other settings around the nation; NAGLE JACKSON was the first American to be invited to direct in the Soviet Union. As a producer he has enjoyed lengthy artistic directorships at the Milwaukee Repertory Theatre (1970-76) and at Princeton’s McCarter Theatre (1979-90), which has been recognized with a regional-theatre Tony Award. He has seven productions to his credit at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, along with shows in such settings as the Hartford Stage Company, the Seattle Repertory Company, San Diego’s Old Globe Theatre, and San Francisco’s American Conservatory Theatre. Mr. Jackson is also a dramatist and actor, and his roles have included Autolycus (The Winter’s Tale), Bertram (All’s Well That Ends Well), Demetrius (A Midsummer Night’s Dream), Feste (Twelfth Night), Lucio (Measure for Measure), and Octavius (Antony and Cleopatra).

___________________

James Shapiro’s BBC Series on Shakespeare

    

Monday, December 17, at 7:30 p.m.    

National Arts Club, 15 Gramercy Park South 

No Charge, but Reservations Advised

 

As the author of such award-winning volumes as Shakespeare and the Jews (1996), Oberammergau (2000), 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare (2005), and Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare? (2010), Columbia University’s JAMES SHAPIRO has established himself as one of today’s most prominent scholars and reviewers, with frequent appearances on the Charlie Rose Show and other television and radio programs, and with numerous articles in periodicals such as the New York Times. On this occasion he’ll preview a riveting segment from his latest endeavor, a three-hour BBC documentary, The King and the Playwright, which has been shortlisted for a major TV award in the UK. After Mr. Shapiro screens his fascinating account of the 1605 Gunpowder Plot against James I and his court, and its impact on the chief dramatist for the theatrical company that profited from the monarch’s own patronage, he and the Guild’s John Andrews will join the audience for an engaging discussion of the episode.

___________________

For additional detail about these and other offerings, and for information about membership in The Shakespeare Guild, visit the website below or contact

 

John F. Andrews

The Shakespeare Guild

5B Calle San Martin       

Santa Fe, NM 87506

www.shakesguild.org      

 
Redcrosse in Coventry

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0411  Monday, 15 October 2012

 

From:        BSA < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 15, 2012 9:52:13 AM EDT

Subject:     Redcrosse in Coventry

 

British Shakespeare Association


On the evening of Saturday the 17th of November the RSC will be performing Redcrosse, the new poetic liturgy for England and St George which BSA member Professor Ewan Fernie (Shakespeare Institute) wrote with the major poets Jo Shapcott, Michael Symmons Roberts and Andrew Motion, and the theologian Andrew Shanks, as part of a multi-grant-winning Religion and Society project.  Redcrosse got considerable national press last year, in The Guardian, on radio and television, and even in The Daily Star, when it was performed in Windsor Castle and Manchester Cathedral.  Its RSC production in the modernist masterpiece of Coventry Cathedral will be its most dramatic and exciting instantiation to date.  Don’t miss it.  For further details and tickets, please see the link below.

 

http ://www . coventrycathedral . org . uk/goldenjubilee/EVENTDETAIL2 . php?event_id_choice=19400

 

Dr Rowan Williams on Redcrosse:

‘How do we think about identity in ways that don’t reflect anxiety, fear of the other, uncritical adulation of our past and all the other pitfalls that surround this subject? The Redcrosse project manages to negotiate these difficulties with immense imaginative energy and honesty: no sour notes, no attempt to overcompensate by desperately overapologetic rhetoric, simply a recovery of deep roots and generous vision. As much as it takes its cue from Spenser, it’s a contemporary working out of some of the great and inexhaustible legacy of Blake, a unique contribution to what is often a pretty sterile discussion of who we are in these islands.’

 

Dr Rowan Williams

Archbishop of Canterbury

UK

 
Shakespeare Works When Shakespeare Plays

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0410  Monday, 15 October 2012

 

From:        UC Davis - School of Education < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Thursday, Oct 11, 2012 at 7:11 PM

Subject:     Shakespeare Works When Shakespeare Plays

 

Shakespeare Works When Shakespeare Plays 

A Workshop-Conference for Teachers

 

A dynamic three-day conference for English and Drama teachers held on January 18 – 20, 2013

 

Teaching Artists from some of the world’s most respected Shakespeare Theatres will share active and playful approaches to enliven the teaching of Shakespeare. The weekend is presented by the UC Davis School of Education and the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts at UC Davis in association with Globe Education (Shakespeare’s Globe, London) and the Shakespeare Theatre Association. 

 

Download our e-flier here.

 

Register Now

Register here

Early Bird Registration until November 1: $349. 

After November 1: $375. 

Send a team and save. 

Groups of six or more take $30 off per registration.

 

Invited Presenters

 

American Shakespeare Center (Virginia)

Atlanta Shakespeare Festival

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company

Folger Shakespeare

Oregon Shakespeare Festival

San Francisco Shakespeare Festival

Shakespeare’s Globe (London)

Shakespeare & Company (Lennox, Mass.)

Shakespeare Center of Los Angeles

Stratford Shakespeare Festival (Canada)

Utah Shakespeare Festival

 

We invite you to join us for a weekend of lively workshops designed to provide teachers with strategic, practical approaches to understanding Shakespeare’s work and the connections and applications that his work inspires. Our second annual conference at the beautiful Mondavi Center, UC Davis, brings together actors, directors and teaching artists from the world’s leading Shakespeare festivals to share their insights for teaching Shakespeare in the classroom.

 

Please Visit The Conference Website For More Information:
http://shakespeareplays.ucdavis.edu

 
Shakespeare and the Second World War

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0405  Friday, 5 October 2012

 

From:        Al Magary < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 2, 2012 7:38:29 PM EDT

Subject:     Shakespeare and the Second World War

 

Al Magary forwarded this announcement from the FICINO list:

 

=============================================================

Dear All,

 

Marissa McHugh and I are delighted to share the good news that our multi-authored book, Shakespeare and the Second World War:  Memory, Culture, Identity (University of Toronto Press) has just been published.  

 

Here is the link:
http://www.utppublishing.com/Shakespeare-and-the-Second-World-War-Memory-Culture-Identity.html

 


and a description from the dust jacket:

 


Shakespeare’s works occupy a prismatic and complex position in world culture: they straddle both the high and the low, the national and the foreign, literature and theatre. The Second World War presents a fascinating case study of this phenomenon: most, if not all, of its combatants have laid claim to Shakespeare and have called upon his work to convey their society’s self-image.

 

In wartime, such claims frequently brought to the fore a crisis of cultural identity and of competing ownership of this ‘universal’ author. Despite this, the role of Shakespeare during the Second World War has not yet been examined or documented in any depth. Shakespeare and the Second World War provides the first sustained international, collaborative incursion into this terrain. The essays demonstrate how the wide variety of ways in which Shakespeare has been recycled, reviewed, and reinterpreted from 1939–1945 are both illuminated by and continue to illuminate the War today

 

Please share this information with interested friends, colleagues, and students, and especially with your university librarian!

 

With thanks,

Irene (Irena) R. Makaryk

Professor 

Department of English

University of Ottawa

 
Shakespeare Among the Courtesans

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0404  Friday, 5 October 2012

 

From:        Hattie Wilson < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 5, 2012 10:48:46 AM EDT

Subject:     Shakespeare Among the Courtesans

 

New From Ashgate Publishing . . . 

 

Shakespeare Among the Courtesans by Duncan Salkeld

 

Paying special attention to Anglo-Italian cultural and sexual relations during the Renaissance, this study traces the development and decline of the courtesan in English drama. Salkeld draws on original historical materials to explore contradictory dramatic representations of courtesans in a variety of texts ranging from Shakespeare's poems and plays to works by Aretino, Nashe, Dekker and Middleton.

 

http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9780754663874     

 

WAS £55.00  NOW £44.00

 

Duncan’s book is available for the members of SHAKSPER.net at a special 20% discount! Simply enter the code C12GWR20 in the box marked promotional code at www.ashgate.com/literary

 

We are also offering our UK customers free P&P until 31st December 2012.

 

Hattie Wilson

Marketing Executive

Ashgate Publishing

 
Fellowships in Critical Bibliography

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0403  Friday, 5 October 2012

 

From:        Donna Sy < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 5, 2012 9:12:41 AM EDT

Subject:     Fellowships in Critical Bibliography 

 

Rare Book School Receives Mellon Foundation Grant to Fund Fellowships in Critical Bibliography

 

Rare Book School welcomes applications from scholars of Shakespeare to The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography.  The aim of this new Mellon Foundation-funded fellowship program is to reinvigorate bibliographical studies within the humanities by introducing doctoral candidates, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty to specialized skills, methods, and professional networks for conducting advanced research with material texts.  

 

Fellows will receive funding for Rare Book School course attendance, as well as generous stipends, and support for research-related travel to special collections, over the course of three years. Weeklong intensive courses at Rare Book School cover topics such as paleography, codicology, scholarly editing, and the history of the book.

 

The deadline for application to the program is DECEMBER 1, 2012. Applicants must be doctoral candidates (post-qualifying exams), postdoctoral fellows, or junior (untenured) faculty in the humanities at a U.S. insitution at time of application.  Interested scholars are encouraged to apply as soon as possible. For more details, please visit:

http://www.rarebookschool.org/fellowships/mellon

 

---

Rare Book School Receives Mellon Foundation Grant to Fund Fellowships in Critical Bibliography

 

New fellowship program seeks to reinvigorate bibliographical studies within the humanities

 

Charlottesville, VA, October 1, 2012 – Rare Book School (RBS) at the University of Virginia has been awarded an $896,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support a new three-year fellowship program, The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography, whose aim is to reinvigorate bibliographical studies within the humanities.

 

The Mellon Fellowship program will enable a select group of doctoral candidates, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty in the humanities to receive advanced, intensive training in the analysis of textual artifacts. Led by a distinguished faculty drawn from the bibliographical community and professionals in allied fields, fellows will attend annual research-oriented seminars at Rare Book School and at major special collections libraries nationwide. Fellows will receive stipends to support research-related travel to special collections, and additional funds to host academic symposia at their home institutions.

 

“This grant will enable our School to deepen and extend its service to the bibliographical community by helping scholars incorporate bibliographical and book-historical methods into their own research and teaching,” said RBS Director Michael F. Suarez, S.J. “I am humbled by the trust that the Foundation has placed in our organization – and deeply gratified by its ratification of our core mission of bibliographical education.”

 

“I expect that these fellowships will sow the seeds for some of the most exciting work from the next generation of humanistic scholars,” commented Michael Winship, Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin. “This Mellon Foundation grant is wonderful news! It will ensure that graduate students and early career academics have an opportunity to be exposed to the theories and methodologies of bibliographical practice.”

 

Twenty Mellon Fellowships will be awarded in the spring of 2013. The deadline for application to the program is December 1, 2012. More information about the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography is available at:   http://www.rarebookschool.org/fellowships/mellon

 

About Rare Book School (RBS)

 

Rare Book School provides continuing-education opportunities for students from all disciplines and levels to study the history of written, printed, and born-digital materials with leading scholars and professionals in the fields of bibliography, librarianship, book history, manuscript studies, and the digital humanities. Founded in 1983, RBS moved to its present home at the University of Virginia in 1992. RBS is a not-for-profit educational organization affiliated with the University of Virginia. More information about RBS is available on its website:http://www.rarebookschool.org

 

For more information, contact:

 

Donna Sy

Mellon Fellowship Program Director 

Rare Book School

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Phone: (434) 243-4296 

 
Shakespeare Position Announcement

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0402  Friday, 5 October 2012

 

From:        Jim Harner < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 4, 2012 4:25:57 PM EDT

Subject:     Shakespeare Position Announcement

 

Associate Professor in Digital Shakespeare Studies

 

The Department of English at Texas A&M University invites applications for a tenured position at the associate professor rank in Digital Shakespeare Studies to begin in the Fall of 2013.  Applicants must have a Ph.D. in a relevant field and a substantial scholarly record in both Shakespeare Studies and Digital Humanities as well as ongoing research initiatives in these areas.  The successful candidate will teach a 2/2 load, including undergraduate and graduate courses in Shakespeare as well as a range of courses in early modern literature and Digital Humanities.  The DH courses will contribute to the offerings of the Digital Humanities Certificate.  The successful candidate will also assume the role of Executive Editor of Early Modern Digital Projects at the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture (IDHMC), including the World Shakespeare Bibliography, Digital Donne, eMOP (the early modern OCR project), and the digital Cervantes and Quixote Iconography projects.  The IDHMC, in collaboration with the Visualization Department (the only one in the country) and Computer Science, is developing sophisticated data analysis and visualization capacities to work with one of the largest digitized collections of early modern texts – 45 million page images.

 

Applicants should submit as PDFs a letter of application specifying how the applicant’s work advances research and teaching in Shakespeare Studies and Digital Humanities, together with a CV, by e-mail to Robert Griffin ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ).  Applicants should also have 3 letters of recommendation sent to Professor Griffin.  We will begin reviewing applications on November 12, 2012, and continue until the position is filled.  Interviews will be held at the MLA.

 

Minorities and women are especially encouraged to apply. Texas A&M is an AA/EEO employer, committed to diversity, and responds to the needs of dual-career couples.  Visit the English Department and IDHMC websites at: http://www-english.tamu.edu/ and http://idhmc.tamu.edu.

 

James L. Harner

Samuel Rhea Gammon Professor of Liberal Arts

Editor, World Shakespeare Bibliography

Department of English

Texas A&M University

College Station, TX 77843-4227

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
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