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Pacific Northwest Renaissance Studies October 18-21, 2012

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.035  Tuesday, 31 January 2012

 

From:         Melissa Walter < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 30, 2012 5:09:13 PM EST

Subject:     Pacific Northwest Renaissance Studies October 18-21, 2012

 

CFP: Renaissance Translation and Transmission (October 18-21, 2012)

The Pacific Northwest Renaissance Society

The Pacific Northwest Renaissance Society invites papers examining all aspects of translation and transmission in and of the Renaissance for its conference to be held from October 18th to 21st, 2012 in Abbotsford, British Columbia, sponsored by the University of the Fraser Valley. Papers might consider, for instance,

  • the art / practice of textual translation and transmission in the Renaissance
  • cross-cultural communication in the Renaissance 
  • “translation” between and across genres and media (theatre, visual arts, music, literature, etc.) and across specialized discourses (for instance from the medical to the political) 
  • the political and ethical implications of translation in and of the early modern period
  • endangered languages and translation in the Renaissance
  • physical acts of translation, such as the remaking of new clothes from old clothes, or other forms of material translation / “carrying across” or transformation
  • the "translation" and “transmission” of early modern texts in manuscript, print and electronic media from the late sixteenth-century onward 
  • translating, transmitting, and teaching the Renaissance in the (post)modern classroom
  • diaspora and translation in the early modern period
  • “translating” and/or “transmitting” the Renaissance in the digital age
  • the untranslatable Renaissance/early modern untranslatabilty
  • mistranslation in (and of) the Renaissance
  • translation and interpretive authority in the Renaissance

Multi-media presentations and traditional papers in the fine arts, the humanities, and the social sciences are encouraged.


Abstracts for individual papers and proposals for three-paper panels are invited.

 

Abstracts should run 250 words for papers of 20-minute delivery length.

 

Panel proposals must include abstracts for all three papers.

 

Deadline: July 15, 2012

 

Acceptances will be sent by August 15, 2012.

 

Submissions should be sent to:

 

Melissa Walter

UFV Department of English

33844 King Road

Abbotsford, BC 

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

For more information see: www.pnrs.org

 
CFP: ESSE Seminar: Shakespeare and Renaissance Period

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.019  Monday, 23 January 2012

 

From:         John Drakakis < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 21, 2012 12:20:40 PM EST

Subject:     CFP: ESSE Seminar: Shakespeare and Renaissance Period

 

Prof. John Drakakis and Dr. Sidia Fiorato will host a seminar on the performances of the Body in the Renaissance Period during the next ESSE conference at Bogazici University, Instanbul, Turkey, from 4 to 8 September 2012.

 

Here is a brief description of the seminar

 

S3) Performances of The Body In The Renaissance Period

 

The seminar intends to analyze the concept of the "body" in the Renaissance period and its subsequent re-articulations and re-interpretations. Modernity considers the body as a place of regulation, shaped by social and political ideologies and specific networks of power; it is strictly connected with the representation of individual identity and the shaping of the juridical persona. Literature and the performing arts (through a language that is written on the body and with the body), can absorb and retain the effects of political power as well as resist the very effects they appear to incorporate in structures of parody, irony, and pastiche.

 

Please send your proposals for the seminar with a 200-word-abstract by January 31, 2012 to

 

Prof. John Drakakis (University of Stirling, UK)

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Dr. Sidia Fiorato (University of Verona, IT)

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This is the link to the conference:

 

http://www.esse2012.org/en/scientific-programme-seminars.html<http://www.e

sse2012.org/en/scientific-programme-seminars.html>

 
 
ASC: Announcing our 2012-2013 Artistic Year

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.017  Saturday, 21 January 2012

 

From:        ASC < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Wednesday, 18 Jan 2012 13:20:10 -0500 (EST)

Subject:     ASC: Announcing our 2012-2013 Artistic Year

 

American Shakespeare Center 

Announcing the 2012/13 Artistic Year Line-up

 

View it in your browser.

 

The sixteen plays in rotating repertory feature nine plays by William Shakespeare:

 

  • The Merchant of Venice
  • The Two Gentlemen of Verona
  • Cymbeline
  • King John *
  • Julius Caesar
  • Henry VIII *
  • The Two Noble Kinsmen *
  • Twelfth Night
  • Love’s Labour’s Lost

 

ASC highlights Shakespeare's contemporaries in The Custom of the Country,* by John Fletcher and Philip Massinger, and The Duchess of Malfi, by John Webster.  You can also see The Country Wife,* a Restoration romp by William Wycherley, and The Lion in Winter,* a modern masterpiece by James Goldman that prefaces the action of King John.

 

The American Shakespeare Center announces the line-up for its 2012-2013 Artistic Year, which will include 16 productions presented over 52 weeks in 5 separate repertory seasons, offering the largest number of plays per year by Shakespeare and Early Modern playwrights of any theatre in the world.

The lineup features nine plays by William Shakespeare: The Merchant of Venice; The Two Gentlemen of Verona; Cymbeline; King John; Julius Caesar; Henry VIII; The Two Noble Kinsmen; Twelfth Night; and Love’s Labour’s Lost.

Also included are two plays by contemporaries of Shakespeare: The Custom of the Country, by John Fletcher and Philip Massinger, and The Duchess of Malfi by John Webster; one Restoration comedy, The Country Wife by William Wycherly; and a well-known modern offering, The Lion in Winter by James Goldman. 

 

Our three holiday favorites - A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, The Santaland Diaries by David Sedaris, and The Twelve Dates of Christmas by ASC actor Ginna Hoben - will be return in December.

 

Get more information and title listing by season HERE...

 

* indicates a Blackfriars Playhouse premiere

 

American Shakespeare Center 

10 S. Market St

Staunton, Virginia 24401

 
 
CFP: Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.016  Saturday, 21 January 2012

 

From:         Michele Marrapodi < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 19, 2012 2:38:52 PM EST

Subject:     Reminder Call for Papers

 

Dear Colleagues, 

 

This is a reminder of the Call for Papers for the collection of essays: 

 

Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: 

Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition 

 

Edited by 

Michele Marrapodi 

(General editor Ashgate's AIRS Series) 

 

This new collection of essays aims to place the works of Shakespeare within the context of the European Renaissance and, more specifically, within the context of Italian cultural, dramatic, and literary traditions, with reference to the impact and influence of both classical and contemporary culture. In contrast with previous studies, often characterized by a positivistic-deterministic hermeneutics and, consequently, by a largely passive analysis of source material or literary topoi, the new critical perspective pursued in this volume will take into account a wider European intertextual dimension and, above all, an ideological interpretation of the ‘aesthetics’ or ‘politics’ of intertextuality which will allow the analysis of the presence of the Italian world in early modern England not as a traditional treasure trove of influence and imitation but as a potential cultural force, generating complex processes of appropriation, transformation, and ideological opposition throughout a continuous dialectical interchange of compliance and subversion. 

 

Please send a 200-word abstract of the proposed chapter directly to the editor before 29 February 2012.

 

Best wishes.

 

Michele Marrapodi

Dipt. FIERI-AGLAIA

Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia

Viale delle Scienze

90128 Palermo, Italy

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CFP: ESSE Shakespeare Seminar

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.014  Thursday, 19 January 2012

 

From:         Krystyna Kujawinska-Courtney <  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Thursday, January 19, 2012 3:50 PM

Subject:     CFP: ESSE Shakespeare Seminar

 

We are glad to inform you that our seminar topic, ‘Exclusion In Shakespeare Studies’ [S72] has been included in ESSE 12, (‘XII Conference of the European Society for the Study of English’") to be held at Bogazici University, Instanbul, Turkey, from 4 to 8 September 2012. 

 

Both Sarbani & myself welcome 300 word abstract with a tile on the topic. Please email it to us by 31 January 2012.

 

S72) "Have We Devils Here?: Exclusion In Shakespeare Studies

Cultural, social and political exclusion/inclusion, generated by e.g. race, age, gender, religion, ethnicity, has been a facet of existence since the inception of civilization. Drawing on work by Byrne, 2005; Young, 2002; Fraser, 2000, we propose to use 'exclusion' as a conceptual and critical category to negotiate Shakespeare works, their translations, adaptations, productions and criticism by investigating their causal and instrumental links with deprivation, disentitlement and market inaccessibility. We believe that by focusing on exclusion and the struggles for emancipation promised through the recognition of difference, both the marginalised and the occluded will be highlighted, facilitating innovative readings of Shakespeare.

The link for the conference is http://www.esse2012.org

 

Please feel free to contact us for further details:

 

Sarbani CHAUDHURY (University of Kalyani, INDIE) 
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Krystyna KUJAWINSKA-COURTNEY (The University of Lodz, POLAND) 
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CFP: Shakespeare across Media

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.013  Monday, 16 January 2012

 

From:         Beatrice Lei < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 15, 2012 3:46:07 AM EST

Subject:      CFP: Shakespeare across Media

 

Call for Papers: Shakespeare across Media

6th Conference of the NTU Shakespeare Forum

 

The National Taiwan University Shakespeare Forum will host its sixth conference, “Shakespeare across Media,” in Taipei on June 7-9, 2012. 

 

Keynote speakers include Russell Jackson (Allardyce Nicoll Chair in Drama, University of Birmingham), Diana Henderson (Professor of Literature and Dean for Curriculum and Faculty Support, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and Ching-Hsi Perng (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, National Taiwan University).  Alexander C. Y. Huang (George Washington University; Co-Director of Global Shakespeares: Video and Performance Archive) and Yong Li Lan (National University of Singapore; Director of A|S||I|A: Asian Shakespeare Intercultural Archive), along with Japanese and Korean co-directors of A|S||I|A, will offer plenary sessions and hand-on workshops on digital archives.  Taiwan Bangzi Company will present a Chinese opera adaptation of Measure for Measure at the National Theatre and offer post-performance discussion.  There will also be screening of the latest Shakespearean films.  Conference participants can also join the post-conference tours on June 9 and 10 at their own expenses. 

 

Proposals for 20-minute papers are invited on any aspect of the conference theme.  Topics may include, but are not restricted to: radio, film, television, animation, manga, games, multimedia staging, e-books, children’s books, digital archives, YouTube, Second Life, social networking websites, mobile phone applications, and cross-genre adaptation and translation.  Graduate students are invited to apply to present at the pre-conference graduate sessions.

 

Please send a 250-word abstract and a short bio by February 15, 2012.  If accepted for presentation, completed papers must be submitted by May 15.  To facilitate discussion among international scholars, papers in English are preferred.  For submissions and queries please contact Bi-qi Beatrice Lei at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .  Updates can be found on www.shakespeare.tw.

 
 
Reformation, Vol. 16

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.012  Thursday, 12 January 2012

 

From:         Colleen E. Kennedy < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 12, 2012 11:59:35 AM EST

Subject:     Reformation, Vol. 16

 

[Apologies for cross-posting]

 

I am pleased to announce the publication of Reformation, vol. 16 (2011). The online edition is available now (http://www.equinoxjournals.com/REFORMATION/issue/current), and printed copies will be available shortly.

 

Hannibal

 

Reformation 16 (2011)

 

Articles:

 

Paul Dustin Stegner, “Treasonous Reconciliations: Robert Southwell, Religious Polemic, and the Criminalization of Confession”

 

Kat Lecky, “Milton’s Lydgate: A New Perspective on the Nativity Ode”

 

Jack Patrick Cunningham, “Changing Fashions: The Coming of Reformation in Iceland”

 

Sophie Isabella Gray, “Tyndale and the Text in the Heart”

 

Bracy V. Hill II, “‘Faithful Accounts’?: The Hampton Court Conference and the King James

 

Bible in Eighteenth-Century Dissenting Histories”

 

Grace Tiffany, “Shakespeare's Parables”

 

 

Review Articles:

 

Stephen Bowd, “Religious Reform in Sixteenth-Century Italy”

 

Kenneth Austin, “Jews and Christians in Early Modern Europe”

 

 

Reviews:

 

Matthew Milner, Review of The Reformation of Feeling, by Susan C. Karant-Nunn (Oxford University Press, 2010).

 

John N. King, Review of The Book in the Renaissance, by Andrew Pettegree (Yale University Press, 2010).

 

Sylvia Gill, Review of The Senses and the English Reformation, by Matthew Milner (Ashgate, 2011).

 

Bridget Heal, Review of Ideas and Cultural Margins in Early Modern Germany, ed. Marjorie E. Plummer and Robin B. Barnes (Ashgate, 2009).

 

Janet Dickinson, Review of Elizabeth I: Translations, ed. Janel Mueller and Joshua Scodel (University of Chicago Press, 2009).

 

Peter Webster, Review of Music and Society in Early Modern England, by Christopher Marsh (Cambridge University Press, 2010).

 

Esther Mijers, Review of Women, Religion, and the Atlantic World, 1600–1800, ed. Daniella Kostroun and Lisa Vollendorf (University of Toronto Press, 2009).

 

Hannibal Hamlin

Associate Professor of English

Editor, Reformation

Co-curator, Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

http://www.manifoldgreatness.org/

The Ohio State University

Columbus, OH 43210-1340

 
 
NEH Summer Seminar at Amherst College Summer 2012

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.009  Monday, 9 January 2012

 

From:         Megan Estes < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 9, 2012 12:11:55 PM EST

Subject:     NEH Summer Seminar at Amherst College Summer 2012

 

SUMMER SEMINAR ON PUNISHMENT, POLITICS, AND CULTURE

Amherst College will host a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for K-12 teachers and current full time graduate students who intend to pursue a career in K-12 teaching, from June 25-July 27, 2012.  The seminar will be directed by Austin Sarat of the Departments of Political Science and Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought.  It will examine three questions:  What is punishment and why do we punish as we do?   What can we learn about politics, law, and culture in the United States from an examination of our practices of punishment?  What are the appropriate limits of punishment?  The application deadline is March 1, 2012.  Information is available at http://www.amherst.edu/go/neh.  If you have any questions regarding the seminar or the application process, contact Megan Estes at (413)542-2380 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

*Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.*

  

Megan L. Estes Ryan

Academic Department Coordinator

Amherst College Law, Jurisprudence & Social Thought

PO Box 5000, Clark House

Amherst, MA   01002

(413) 542-2380

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Borrowers and Lenders 6.2

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.008  Monday, 9 January 2012

 

From:         Sujata Iyengar < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:          January 6, 2012 7:25:44 PM EST

Subject:      B&L 6.2 

 

The Editors are thrilled to announce the release of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation 6.2, featuring ground-breaking new work by Juliet Dusinberre on Wilfred Owen’s Macbeth (including illustrations of Owen's manuscript revisions to “On My Songs” and “Strange Meeting”); Laurie Osborne on the Outrageous Fortunes of Slings and Arrows; Ailsa Ferguson on the commodified body, Robert Mapplethorpe, and My Own Private Idaho; and reviews by Lisa Starks-Estes and Sheila Cavanagh. You can find current and previous issue at www.borrowers.uga.edu.

 

About the Journal:

Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, founded in 2005, is a peer-reviewed, online, multimedia Shakespeare journal and winner of the CELJ’s :Best New Journal” Award (2007). We are fully indexed in the World Shakespeare Bibliography, the Modern Language Association Bibliography, and other scholarly databases.

The editors of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation welcome original scholarship engaging with the afterlives of Shakespearean texts and their literary, filmic, multimedia, and critical histories. We encourage contributors to use the online format to its best advantage, in particular, by imagining how to enhance or illustrate their essays with multimedia (screen captures, sound clips, images, and so on). General issues appear in the Fall/Winter, and Special issues in the Spring/Summer, although the production schedule can vary. We welcome suggestions for themes for special issues.

 

General inquiries should be addressed to the General Editors, Christy Desmet and Sujata Iyengar, by email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or to Associate Editor Robert Sawyer at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Book reviewers may contact our book review editor, Joshua King, directly by email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Reviewers of Appropriations in Performance may contact our performance review editor, Matthew Kozusko, directly at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , for guidelines.

 

Special Issue: We are currently calling for papers for a special issue on “Shakespeare and African American Poetics,” in collaboration with the Langston Hughes Review, with “Poetics” understood broadly to encompass all forms of African American artistic and literary endeavor. Essays will be sent to both a Shakespearean and to an African Americanist for review. Send completed essays to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it by March 1, 2012. Queries are welcome and should be addressed to the General Editors.

 

Dr. Sujata IyengarPark Hall

Department of English

University of Georgia

Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
ASC: The 2012 Actors’ Renaissance Season

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.007  Monday, 9 January 2012

 

From:         Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:          Monday, 9 January 2012    

Subject:      ASC: The 2012 Actors’ Renaissance Season

 

American Shakespeare Center Announces The 2012 Actors’ Renaissance Season 

 

Much Ado about Nothing

STARTS JANUARY 6

In Much Ado about Nothing Shakespeare gives us the sparkling wit of Beatrice and Benedick and the heroic blunders of Dogberry and company.  He gives us the joy of love won and the ache of love lost.  As the villain Don John devises a scheme to shatter the wedding of young lovers Claudio and Hero, friends of Beatrice and Benedick conspire to trick them into admitting their much-denied love for one another.  In this powerful comedy, Shakespeare makes you laugh, but also breaks your heart - and magically puts it back together again.

 

Richard III

STARTS JANUARY 19

Richard III chronicles the cataclysmic end of England’s greatest power struggle, the Wars of the Roses.  Richard, as the play’s remarkable ringmaster, takes the audience into his confidence as he plots to kill everyone before him in line for the throne.  Being seduced by Richard’s shameless treachery is one of theatre-going's most delicious guilty pleasures.

 

Philaster, or Love Lies a-Bleeding

By Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

STARTS FEBRUARY 2

Blackfriars Premiere. Two love triangles dominate this beautiful, sexy, troubling, and surprising romance.  Two princes and a princess act recklessly, a king rules foolishly, and a curious youth loves hopelessly.  Loves lies bleeding in Beaumont and Fletcher’s dazzling fairy-tale for adults, but it does ultimately heal.

 

A Mad World, My Masters

By Thomas Middleton

STARTS FEBRUARY 23

Blackfriars Premiere. Middleton’s deliriously sinful comedy introduces the fabulous grifters Dick Follywit, a mad-brain trickster, and Frank Gullman, who turns out to be a resourceful courtesan. Money and sex, swindles and scams take center stage in the mad world of Jacobean London - with the unexpected possibility of true love in a most unlikely couple.

 

Dido, Queen of Carthage

By Christopher Marlowe

STARTS MARCH 14

Blackfriars Premiere. Arriving in Carthage after the fall of his beloved city, the Trojan hero Aeneas begins a passionate and dangerous love affair with Queen Dido.  Unknown to the lovers, the gods are pulling their strings - with disastrous results.  Part Antony and Cleopatra, part A Midsummer Night's Dream, and part The Tempest - Dido, Queen of Carthage is Marlowe’s ravishing take on Virgil’s Aeneid.

 

American Shakespeare Center 

10 S. Market St

Staunton, Virginia 24401

 
 
Folger Exhibition: The King James Bible

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.006  Monday, 9 January 2012

 

From:         Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:          Monday, January 9, 2012              

Subject:      Folger Exhibition: The King James Bible

 

 

Alpha and Omega

Folger Exhibitions: The King James Bible

 

Manifold Greatness, which tells the story of the creation of the King James Bible and the book’s ongoing cultural influence closes at the Folger this month. Explore the dynamic history of the King James Bible, from its roots in earlier English translations to its appearance in popular culture. Plus, exhibition curator Hannibal Hamlin dispels some famous King James Bible myths, and the interactive Read the Book feature allows you to read the text, listen to commentary, or hear recordings of selected passages. 

 

A traveling exhibition of Manifold Greatness will be on tour throughout the U.S. until 2013. Check the tour schedule to see if it’s coming to a city near you. 

 

Exhibition closes at the Folger January 16! 

Open Daily 

10am to 5pm, Monday through Saturday 

12pm to 5pm, Sunday

 

Free:

BlogWorthy: Myths Debunked

Interactive: Read the Book

Plan a Visit: Manifold Greatness Tour Schedule

 
 
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