Announcements

CFP: Shakespeare in Shanghai Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.570  Wednesday, 23 December 2015

 

From:        Laura Estill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         December 23, 2015 at 11:58:06 AM EST

Subject:    CFP: Shakespeare in Shanghai Conference

 

“Shakespeare in Shanghai Conference—Translation, Transculturation and Global Perspectives”

 

12 and 13 March 2016, School of Foreign Languages, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

 

Call for Papers

To remember the 400th anniversary of the death of Shakespeare, we invite papers on Shakespeare and his contemporaries from many points of view, including translation, transculturation and global perspectives.  We welcome papers of 15 to 20 minutes from scholars in all disciplines and from an interdisciplinary point of view. Is Shakespeare a writer in English, a figure in Chinese Literature and culture, a global author or all three?  What is the relation between text and context, performance and reading, Shakespeare and his contemporaries, Shakespeare and his afterlife in times and interpretations to the present?  The conference will be pluralistic and welcomes you to bring your own vantage to Shakespeare and his contemporaries, especially as they relate to him.  We welcome work from scholars in all fields, not simply those who work in literature, drama and film, and researchers worldwide as well as in China and Asia.  This conference is part of the commitment of Shanghai Jiao Tong University to Shakespeare Studies and, more generally, to Humanities and to its School of Foreign Languages, which is active in many areas including Literature, Comparative Literature, Creative Writing, Culture and Linguistics.

 

Please send a paper or abstract by 11 January 2016 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

We hope to respond expeditiously.

 

 

 

Book Announcement

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.559  Monday, 14 December 2015

 

From:        Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         December 14, 2015 at 4:44:27 AM EST

Subject:    Book Announcement

 

Dear SHAKSPERians,

 

I am pleased to announce the publication of my new book, Terrorism Before the Letter: Mythography and Political Violence in England, Scotland, and France 1559 -1642. It contains a lot of material about Shakespeare and Marlowe.

 

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/terrorism-before-the-letter-9780198745761?cc=se&lang=en&# 

 

Terrorism Before the Letter Mythography and Political Violence in England, Scotland, and France 1559-1642

 

By Robert Appelbaum

 

  • Offers the first account of terrorism—its impact, extent, and literary accounts—for England, Scotland, and France in this period
  • Presents a new theory of terrorist violence, based on history as well as philosophy and political science
  • Combines the literatures and events of England, Scotland, and France in one analysis
  • Uses a methodology based on Kenneth Burke’s ‘grammar of motives’
  • Written in a clear, compelling, and accesible style

 

Robert Appelbaum

Professor of English Literature

Engelska Institutionen

Uppsala Universitet

 

 

 

CFP Blackfriars X SW. Deadline Dec 15

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.553  Wednesday, 9 December 2015

 

From:        Joe Stephenson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         December 7, 2015 at 5:51:03 PM EST

Subject:    CFP Blackfriars X SW. Deadline Dec 15

 

The Blackfriars by Southwest Conference will take place April 8-10 in Austin, Texas, at the beautiful Curtain Theatre, an outdoor, Elizabethan-style wooden O. The conference is modeled after the biennial Blackfriars Conference in Staunton, Virginia, in which short (10 minutes—or 13 minutes if actors are included) papers are delivered in an all-plenary format.

 

The keynote speaker for the event is Ralph Alan Cohen of the American Shakespeare Center. The conference will also feature the participation of several stalwarts of the Austin theater scene: James Loehlin and his Winedale group, Beth Burns and The Hidden Room, and—our featured event—a full-scale production of Richard III by The Baron’s Men, directed by ASC alum Joe Falocco. 

 

The theme chosen for the conference is “Performing Histories.” Papers that deal with history plays, with the performance of early modern plays in their historical context, and/or with the performance history of a play are especially encouraged, but abstracts on any topic dealing with early modern drama will be considered. 

 

The organizers encourage submissions from scholars, graduate students, actors, directors, and theater impresarios. The special joy of the Blackfriars brand of conference is the intersection of scholarship and practice. 

 

Use this link to submit your abstract by Dec. 15:

http://americanshakespearecenter.formstack.com/forms/blackfriars_conference_2015cfp_copy


Thank you.

 

Joe Stephenson

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Associate Professor of English

Abilene Christian University 

 

 

 

 

Shakespeare Visions ENGL 16-0257

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.552  Wednesday, 9 December 2015

 

From:        Allston James <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Date:         04 December 2015 at 21:15 

Subject:    Shakespeare Visions ENGL 16-0257

 

Monterey Peninsula College (CA) is offering a 3-unit 100% online course, Shakespeare Visions ENGL 16-0257, from January 3-26. The course is taught by Allston James, whose play Suribachi won the 2015 British Theatre Challenge. Students will explore King Lear, Hamlet and Macbeth in online discussion forums and view PBS Masterpiece Theatre adaptations via ‘streaming’ video.  To enroll, students must register through the college at mpc.edu. See MPC’s website for tuition information on California and non-resident fees. Anyone wishing further information about the course may contact Allston James at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

ENGL 16 (0257)  Shakespeare Visions (Shakespeare on Film) 

Early Spring ‘16

 

**100% ONLINE  - 3 transfer units **

 

Get your academic semester off to a thrilling start with this 100% online course. We will ‘stream’ three film adaptations of Shakespeare classics and discuss them on an online ‘forum’. No previous Shakespeare experience required!  If you studied Shakespeare earlier in school and hated it, the fault was not yours. Most teachers have no idea how to teach Shakespeare. 

 

Macbeth, Hamlet and King Lear are three of the world’s great masterpieces. What do they have in common? For one thing, they each center on family issues (to say the least). Also, the stories all involve deep romantic passion, out-of-control violence, and timeless moral lessons. What’s not to like?

 

Questions? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Registration Opens Dec. 1

 

Instructor Allston James has taught Shakespeare for many years and as a playwright is winner of the 2015 British Theatre Challenge in London.

 

ENGL 16 (0257)  Shakespeare Visions (Shakespeare on Film) 

Early Spring ‘16

**100% ONLINE  - 3 transfer units **

 

Get your academic semester off to a thrilling start with this 100% online course. We will ‘stream’ three film adaptations of Shakespeare classics and discuss them on an online ‘forum’. No previous Shakespeare experience required!  If you studied Shakespeare earlier in school and hated it, the fault was not yours. Most teachers have no idea how to teach Shakespeare. 

 

Macbeth, Hamlet and King Lear are three of the world’s great masterpieces. What do they have in common? For one thing, they each center on family issues (to say the least). Also, the stories all involve deep romantic passion, out-of-control violence, and timeless moral lessons. What’s not to like?

Questions? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Registration Opens Dec. 1

 

Instructor Allston James has taught Shakespeare for many years and as a playwright is winner of the 2015 British Theatre Challenge in London.

 

ENGL 16 (0257)  Shakespeare Visions (Shakespeare on Film) 

Early Spring ‘16

**100% ONLINE  - 3 transfer units **

 

Get your academic semester off to a thrilling start with this 100% online course. We will ‘stream’ three film adaptations of Shakespeare classics and discuss them on an online ‘forum’. No previous Shakespeare experience required!  If you studied Shakespeare earlier in school and hated it, the fault was not yours. Most teachers have no idea how to teach Shakespeare. 

 

Macbeth, Hamlet and King Lear are three of the world’s great masterpieces. What do they have in common? For one thing, they each center on family issues (to say the least). Also, the stories all involve deep romantic passion, out-of-control violence, and timeless moral lessons. What’s not to like?

Questions? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Registration Opens Dec. 1

 

Instructor Allston James has taught Shakespeare for many years and as a playwright is winner of the 2015 British Theatre Challenge in London.

 


 

 

New Shakespeare Newsletter Feature

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.549  Monday, 7 December 2015

 

From:        John Mahon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         December 4, 2015 at 6:36:37 PM EST

Subject:    New Shakespeare Newsletter Feature

 

The Shakespeare Newsletter will celebrate its 65th anniversary of publication in 2016, and also in 2016 it will celebrate the second anniversary of SNL’s new online presence, “In the Glassy Margents,” a blog designed to offer Shakespeareans reviews of new plays and films, recently-published books, etc. The blog will serve as a supplement to the print journal, which has just adopted a publication schedule of two 60-page issues per year.

 

SNL editor Thomas J. Moretti offers some background: “Our purpose “in the glassy margents” is to plot new terrain for reports, reviews, scholarship, and reflections on topics not readily covered by or accessible within well established news websites. The editorial board will ensure that each contribution demonstrates knowledge of early modern literature, culture, and/or contemporary performance. Whenever seminal books and performances are covered, reviewers will themselves hail from somewhere along the margins when possible: new scholars, retired professors, unaffiliated enthusiasts, Ph.D. candidates, and adjunct scholars.” Which is not to preclude contributions from established scholars!

 

The best way to get the flavor of the new SNL initiative is to access the site, at www.glassymargents.com  When you open the blog, be sure to go to the ABOUT tab and find out where the phrase “In the Glassy Margents” comes from.

 

When you’re ready to submit a contribution to the blog, send it to The Shakespeare Newsletter at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. SHAKSPEAREANS would seem to be natural candidates for contributors to both sides of SNL, the printed journal and the online blog.

 

 

 

Speaking of Shakespeare with Columbia's James Shapiro

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.543  Wednesday, 25 November 2015

 

From:        John Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 25, 2015 at 12:59:40 PM EST

Subject:    Speaking of Shakespeare with Columbia's James Shapiro

 

The gathering below will help launch the Shakespeare Guild’s commemoration of Shakespeare 400, a year-long celebration of the poet Emerson described as “inconceivably wise.” Hoping to see you again, and encouraging you to spread the word about what promises to be a memorable evening,

  

A Conversation with James Shapiro  

 

Monday, November 30, at 7:00 p.m.

The National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, Manhattan

Admission Free, Open to the Public

 

The Shakespeare Guild is pleased to invite you to another lively conversation with the author of such celebrated volumes as Shakespeare and the Jews (1996), A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare, 1599 (2005), and Contested will: Who Wrote Shakespeare? (2010). 

 

James Shapiro, who holds a prestigious chair at Columbia University, is one of today’s most influential critics, with appearances on Charlie Rose and other TV and radio programs, and with articles in such periodicals as the New York Times, where he recently weighed in with a powerful column about modernized texts of Shakespeare’s poems and plays.  In 2012 he hosted a 3-hour BBC documentary, The King and the Playwright, and in 2014 he published Shakespeare in America, a Library of America anthology that traces a Stratford dramatist’s fortunes on this side of the Atlantic. 

 

On Monday night he’ll talk about his latest book, 1606: William Shakespeare and the Year of Lear, a critically acclaimed study of the playwright’s response to developments that were capturing the public’s attention while he was completing what many regard as his most profound tragedy. Copies of the volume will be available for purchase, and Dr. Shapiro will be delighted in inscribe them.       

 

See www.shakesguild.org/events.html for details, not only about this gathering and an enticing array of 2016 programs, but about a recent Gielgud Award presentation at the Guildhall in London. 

 

John F. Andrews, President
The Shakespeare Guild
5B Calle San Martin
Santa Fe, NM 87506-7536
(505) 988-9560 (Office)

(505) 670-9815 (iPhone) 

www.shakesguild.org  

 

 

 

 

CFP Shakespeare on Indian Screens

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.539  Tuesday, 24 November 2015

 

From:        Indian Shakespeares <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 22, 2015 at 3:03:41 AM EST

Subject:    CFP Shakespeare on Indian Screens 

 

CFP Shakespeare on Indian Screens Extended Deadline 15 December

 

<><><>Call for Papers<><><>

 

Indian Shakespeares on Screen 

27-30 April 2016

 

Talks, workshops and exhibition at Asia House, London – 27-29 April

&

Screenings with Q&A: Vishal Bhardwaj's trilogy Maqbool, Omkara, Haider in collaboration with the British Film Institute, London – 29&30 April 

 

 

Keynote Panel: Vishal Bhardwaj and his scriptwriters in discussion

Vishal Bhardwaj, Director: Maqbool, Omkara, Haider
Abbas Tyrewala (Maqbool, 2004)

Robin Bhatt and Abhishek Chaubey (Omkara, 2006)

Basharat Peer (Haider, 2014)

 

Indian Shakespeares on stage have garnered the increasing attention of academics both Western and Eastern, yet local and regional screen versions continue to be largely overlooked within the scope of Shakespeare on film. It has been a decade since the publication of India’s Shakespeare: Translation, Interpretation and Performance (2005), where Poonam Trivedi observes that despite the seven hundred million speakers of different Indian languages worldwide, Shakespeare’s impact on the theatre and films in these languages has yet to be accorded the critical attention it merits. In 2014, we hosted a one-day conference in London to discuss the relationship between Shakespeare and Hindi cinema/ Bollywood, the world's largest cinema industry. In 2016, we seek to widen this discussion to include the relationship between Shakespeare and Indian cinema, bringing together researchers and practitioners to establish the state of current scholarship in this vibrant, under examined field.

 

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers (and panels), posters and creative approaches, from scholars of all disciplines including film studies, postcolonial studies, Shakespeare studies and translation studies. These could be on any aspect of Shakespeare and Indian cinema, especially regional cinemas and overlooked aspects of Shakespeare in Bollywood.

 

Topics could include:

●     prehistories

●     Indian film translations/adaptations/appropriations of Shakespeare's works

●     practitioners'/directors'/writers'/others' experiences

●     intertextual adaptations/intermedial crossovers

●     Shakespeare in Indian film festivals 

●     documentaries on any aspect of Shakespeare in India/Indian Shakespeares

●     screenplays 

●     economics global and local

●     comparisons of Shakespeare in Indian cinema to Shakespearean adaptations in other countries 

●     Shakespeare in Indian cinema and regional audience reception

●     Shakespeare and parallel cinema

●     beyond Parsi theatre: Indian Shakespeare cinema and other indigenous performance traditions

●     Shakespeare and South-Asian diaspora films

●     challenges of researching Shakespeare and Indian cinema

●     challenges to and importance of building an archive

●     Shakespeare and socio-political campaigns in Indian cinema

●     gendering Shakespeare in Indian cinema

●     artwork and promotional material: posters, flybills, film trailers, coffee table books, music releases

 

Abstracts of 300 words and/or panel proposals (plus a 50 word bio) should be sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 15 December 2015.

 

Responses will be made by 20 December 2015.  

 

Organised by:

Thea Buckley, Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham

Koel Chatterjee, Royal Holloway, University of London

Dr Varsha Panjwani, Boston University (London) and University of York

Dr Preti Taneja, University of Warwick and Queen Mary, University of London 

 

Academic Advisor: 

Dr Deana Rankin, Royal Holloway, University of London

 

Indian Shakespeares on Screen, London, April 27 - 30, 2016

 

 

 

Early Theatre 18.2 (2015)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.538  Tuesday, 24 November 2015

 

From:        Helen M Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 23, 2015 at 11:44:57 AM EST

Subject:    Early Theatre 18.2 (2015)

 

EARLY THEATRE 18.2 (2015)

This issue will be mailed out to subscribers and made available to subscribers online in December.  It is our last paper issue; starting with 19.1 (2016) ET/REED will become a digital journal only.  The Note and the Issues in Review section are of particular interest to scholars working on women in theatre.

 

Announcement of essay prize-winners  

 

Articles

An Acoustical Approach to the Study of the Wagons of the York Mystery Plays: Structure and Orientation

            Mariana Lopez

 

‘Here may we se a merveyl one’: Miracles and the Psalter in the N-Town ‘Marriage of Mary and Joseph’

            Frank Napolitano

 

From Court to Playhouse and Back: Middleton's Appropriation of the Masque

            Caroline Baird

 

‘I will keep and character that name’: Dramatis Personae Lists in Early Modern Manuscript Plays

            Matteo Pangallo          

 

Note

‘We have this day, expell’d our Men the Stage’: Dating the Prologue and Epilogue of The Parson’s Wedding

          Riki Miyoshi

 

Issues in Review

Early Modern Women Theatre Makers

            Contributing Editor: Elizabeth Schafer

 

Introduction: Attending to Early Modern Women as Theatre Makers

            Elizabeth Schafer 

 

Reproducing Iphigenia at Aulis

            Alison Findlay

 

Performing The Tragedy of Mariam and Constructing Stage History

            Ramona Wray

 

Daniel’s Cleopatra and Lady Anne Clifford: From a Jacobean Portrait to Modern Performance

            Yasmin Arshad, Helen Hackett, and Emma Whipday

 

A Performance Studies Approach to The Tragedy of Mariam

            Rebecca McCutcheon

 

Helen M Ostovich  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~english/Faculty/Ostovich.html

Founding Editor, Early Theatre <http://earlytheatre.org/>

Professor Emeritus, English and Cultural Studies

McMaster University

Canada

 

 

 

Critical Survey: New Issue

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.537  Tuesday, 24 November 2015

 

From:        Young Lee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 19, 2015 at 4:14:54 PM EST

Subject:    Critical Survey: New Issue

 

Dear Hardy Cook,

 

I am writing to you from Berghahn Journals, the publisher of Critical Survey (http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/cs/), a peer-reviewed literary studies journal that has dedicated many of its issues to Shakespeare. Our recent issue (Volume 27, Issue 1) would be of great interest to your email list. Would it be possible to post the TOCs to the list? I have attached it for you.

 

Other Issues of Interest:

 

Volume 26, Issue 3 http://berghahn.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/csurv/2014/00000026/00000003

 

Volume 26, Issue 2 - http://berghahn.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/csurv/2014/00000026/00000002

 

Volume 25, Issue 3 - http://berghahn.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/csurv/2013/00000025/00000003

 

Volume 25, Issue 1 - http://berghahn.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/csurv/2013/00000025/00000001

 

We also have a free virtual issue dedicated to Shakespeare. Please feel free to circulate this link to your members : 

http://bit.ly/Shakespeare-Issue

 


Best regards,

Young Lee

 

 Dear Colleague,

 

Berghahn Journals is pleased to announce that the latest issue of Critical Survey has been published. This issue explores the following topics: the sports and leisure activities of Lewis Carroll, ecofeminist critical thinking in William Shakespeare's female characters, how Shakespeare transforms his early picture of female virtue, examples of emotion and perception in a number of Shakespearean dramas, and Beckett's dramatic presentation of a face alone in the dark.

 

Please visit the Berghahn website for more information about the journal: www.journals.berghahnbooks.com/cs

 

 

Current Issue: Volume 27, Issue 1

 

ARTICLES

Aquatics, Play, and Eroticism: Beside the Seaside with Lewis Carroll

JOHN BALE

http://bit.ly/1jS6vn0

 

The Nature of Gender: Are Juliet, Desdemona and Cordelia to their Fathers as Nature is to Culture?

GORDANA GALIĆKAKKONEN  and ANA PENJACK

http://bit.ly/1N8YtBm

 

Going Rogue: Bianca at Large

ELIZABETH MAZZOLA

http://bit.ly/1RBZ6Tm

 

Compassionate Perception and Touching Experiences in Shakespearean Drama

ANNE SOPHIE REFSKOU

http://bit.ly/1OZB9rl

 

'of all things a face appeared': Reading Faces in Samuel Beckett's That Time

JOSHUA POWELL

http://bit.ly/1Wic5jM

 

 

Recommend Critical Survey to your library
As a key researcher in your field you can recommend Critical Survey to your library for subscription. A form for this purpose is provided on the Critical Survey website: http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/cs/?pg=recommend 

 

Free Sample Issue

View a free issue of Critical Survey here:

http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/cs/index.php?pg=sample
 
Free Online Trial:

To sign up for a free 60-day online trial to Critical Survey, please visit:

http://berghahn.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/csurv/trial 

 

Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

Contending with Shakespeare through Adaptation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.530  Friday, 6 November 2015

 

From:        Verena Theile <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 5, 2015 at 4:34:38 PM EST

Subject:    Re: Contending with Shakespeare through Adaptation

 

[Editor’s Note: The original posting of this CFP had the date incorrect. Below is a corrected version of that CFP. –Hardy]

 

CFP for edited collection, Contending with Shakespeare through Adaptation 

 

Chapter proposals are invited for a collection of essays that will explore Shakespearean adaptations as statements, often assertions about the nature of the work they engage. That adaptations have contributed to Shakespeare’s afterlife cannot be disputed. They are re-imaginings of his work in a new context and against a new medium, and, as such, adaptations of Shakespeare are derivative and unique at the same time. With that premise in mind, the history of Shakespeare in adaptation may also uncover the history of assumptions about what Shakespeare constitutes–as a playwright, poet, cultural icon, or otherwise. 

 

The collection we envision will take up adaptations and appropriations with a focus on what these new products reveal about Shakespeare’s parameters or limits. Accordingly, we seek essays that explore cases of appropriation that help bring these limitations to light and confront the implications of transposing Shakespeare to a particular situation or audience. Essays might consider, for example, unexpected failures in appropriation; critically controversial productions or editions; adaptations that explicitly address conflicts in Shakespeare’s reception; or any other instance where a particular appropriation of Shakespeare helped draw attention to unexamined preconceptions of his literary or cultural stature. 

 

Please submit enquiries, chapter proposals (500 words), or drafts of essays (7,500 words) to the editors Verena Theile (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and Adam Kitzes This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by December 1, 2015

 

 

 

This Rough Magic

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.529  Friday, 6 November 2015

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, November 6, 2015

Subject:    This Rough Magic

 

http://thisroughmagic.org/

 

This Rough Magic

A Peer-Reviewed, Academic, Online Journal

Dedicated to the Teaching of Medieval and Renaissance Literature 

 

This Rough Magic was co-founded in 2009 by Michael Boecherer and Bente Videbaek.

 

This Rough Magic is a journal dedicated to the art of teaching Medieval and Renaissance Literature. We are seeking academic, teachable articles. 

 

We are proudly listed on / indexed in the following:

We are seeking academic, teachable articles. Essays could focus on, but are not limited to, the following categories:

  • Authorship & Genre
  • Narrative Structure
  • Poetry/Drama
  • Epic/Nation/Empire
  • History
  • Religion/Superstition
  • Philosophy/Rhetoric
  • Race
  • Ethnicity
  • Gender & Sexuality
  • Art

 

Editorial Board Information

 

Editorial board members are affiliated with the following academic institutions and organizations:

 

Current Editors

 

If you are interested in joining This Rough Magic’s editorial staff, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">Michael Boecherer.

 

 

 

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