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CFP: ESSE Shakespeare Seminar

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.014  Thursday, 19 January 2012

 

From:         Krystyna Kujawinska-Courtney <  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Thursday, January 19, 2012 3:50 PM

Subject:     CFP: ESSE Shakespeare Seminar

 

We are glad to inform you that our seminar topic, ‘Exclusion In Shakespeare Studies’ [S72] has been included in ESSE 12, (‘XII Conference of the European Society for the Study of English’") to be held at Bogazici University, Instanbul, Turkey, from 4 to 8 September 2012. 

 

Both Sarbani & myself welcome 300 word abstract with a tile on the topic. Please email it to us by 31 January 2012.

 

S72) "Have We Devils Here?: Exclusion In Shakespeare Studies

Cultural, social and political exclusion/inclusion, generated by e.g. race, age, gender, religion, ethnicity, has been a facet of existence since the inception of civilization. Drawing on work by Byrne, 2005; Young, 2002; Fraser, 2000, we propose to use 'exclusion' as a conceptual and critical category to negotiate Shakespeare works, their translations, adaptations, productions and criticism by investigating their causal and instrumental links with deprivation, disentitlement and market inaccessibility. We believe that by focusing on exclusion and the struggles for emancipation promised through the recognition of difference, both the marginalised and the occluded will be highlighted, facilitating innovative readings of Shakespeare.

The link for the conference is http://www.esse2012.org

 

Please feel free to contact us for further details:

 

Sarbani CHAUDHURY (University of Kalyani, INDIE) 
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Krystyna KUJAWINSKA-COURTNEY (The University of Lodz, POLAND) 
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
CFP: Shakespeare across Media

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.013  Monday, 16 January 2012

 

From:         Beatrice Lei < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 15, 2012 3:46:07 AM EST

Subject:      CFP: Shakespeare across Media

 

Call for Papers: Shakespeare across Media

6th Conference of the NTU Shakespeare Forum

 

The National Taiwan University Shakespeare Forum will host its sixth conference, “Shakespeare across Media,” in Taipei on June 7-9, 2012. 

 

Keynote speakers include Russell Jackson (Allardyce Nicoll Chair in Drama, University of Birmingham), Diana Henderson (Professor of Literature and Dean for Curriculum and Faculty Support, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and Ching-Hsi Perng (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, National Taiwan University).  Alexander C. Y. Huang (George Washington University; Co-Director of Global Shakespeares: Video and Performance Archive) and Yong Li Lan (National University of Singapore; Director of A|S||I|A: Asian Shakespeare Intercultural Archive), along with Japanese and Korean co-directors of A|S||I|A, will offer plenary sessions and hand-on workshops on digital archives.  Taiwan Bangzi Company will present a Chinese opera adaptation of Measure for Measure at the National Theatre and offer post-performance discussion.  There will also be screening of the latest Shakespearean films.  Conference participants can also join the post-conference tours on June 9 and 10 at their own expenses. 

 

Proposals for 20-minute papers are invited on any aspect of the conference theme.  Topics may include, but are not restricted to: radio, film, television, animation, manga, games, multimedia staging, e-books, children’s books, digital archives, YouTube, Second Life, social networking websites, mobile phone applications, and cross-genre adaptation and translation.  Graduate students are invited to apply to present at the pre-conference graduate sessions.

 

Please send a 250-word abstract and a short bio by February 15, 2012.  If accepted for presentation, completed papers must be submitted by May 15.  To facilitate discussion among international scholars, papers in English are preferred.  For submissions and queries please contact Bi-qi Beatrice Lei at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .  Updates can be found on www.shakespeare.tw.

 
 
Reformation, Vol. 16

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.012  Thursday, 12 January 2012

 

From:         Colleen E. Kennedy < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 12, 2012 11:59:35 AM EST

Subject:     Reformation, Vol. 16

 

[Apologies for cross-posting]

 

I am pleased to announce the publication of Reformation, vol. 16 (2011). The online edition is available now (http://www.equinoxjournals.com/REFORMATION/issue/current), and printed copies will be available shortly.

 

Hannibal

 

Reformation 16 (2011)

 

Articles:

 

Paul Dustin Stegner, “Treasonous Reconciliations: Robert Southwell, Religious Polemic, and the Criminalization of Confession”

 

Kat Lecky, “Milton’s Lydgate: A New Perspective on the Nativity Ode”

 

Jack Patrick Cunningham, “Changing Fashions: The Coming of Reformation in Iceland”

 

Sophie Isabella Gray, “Tyndale and the Text in the Heart”

 

Bracy V. Hill II, “‘Faithful Accounts’?: The Hampton Court Conference and the King James

 

Bible in Eighteenth-Century Dissenting Histories”

 

Grace Tiffany, “Shakespeare's Parables”

 

 

Review Articles:

 

Stephen Bowd, “Religious Reform in Sixteenth-Century Italy”

 

Kenneth Austin, “Jews and Christians in Early Modern Europe”

 

 

Reviews:

 

Matthew Milner, Review of The Reformation of Feeling, by Susan C. Karant-Nunn (Oxford University Press, 2010).

 

John N. King, Review of The Book in the Renaissance, by Andrew Pettegree (Yale University Press, 2010).

 

Sylvia Gill, Review of The Senses and the English Reformation, by Matthew Milner (Ashgate, 2011).

 

Bridget Heal, Review of Ideas and Cultural Margins in Early Modern Germany, ed. Marjorie E. Plummer and Robin B. Barnes (Ashgate, 2009).

 

Janet Dickinson, Review of Elizabeth I: Translations, ed. Janel Mueller and Joshua Scodel (University of Chicago Press, 2009).

 

Peter Webster, Review of Music and Society in Early Modern England, by Christopher Marsh (Cambridge University Press, 2010).

 

Esther Mijers, Review of Women, Religion, and the Atlantic World, 1600–1800, ed. Daniella Kostroun and Lisa Vollendorf (University of Toronto Press, 2009).

 

Hannibal Hamlin

Associate Professor of English

Editor, Reformation

Co-curator, Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

http://www.manifoldgreatness.org/

The Ohio State University

Columbus, OH 43210-1340

 
 
NEH Summer Seminar at Amherst College Summer 2012

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.009  Monday, 9 January 2012

 

From:         Megan Estes < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 9, 2012 12:11:55 PM EST

Subject:     NEH Summer Seminar at Amherst College Summer 2012

 

SUMMER SEMINAR ON PUNISHMENT, POLITICS, AND CULTURE

Amherst College will host a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for K-12 teachers and current full time graduate students who intend to pursue a career in K-12 teaching, from June 25-July 27, 2012.  The seminar will be directed by Austin Sarat of the Departments of Political Science and Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought.  It will examine three questions:  What is punishment and why do we punish as we do?   What can we learn about politics, law, and culture in the United States from an examination of our practices of punishment?  What are the appropriate limits of punishment?  The application deadline is March 1, 2012.  Information is available at http://www.amherst.edu/go/neh.  If you have any questions regarding the seminar or the application process, contact Megan Estes at (413)542-2380 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

*Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.*

  

Megan L. Estes Ryan

Academic Department Coordinator

Amherst College Law, Jurisprudence & Social Thought

PO Box 5000, Clark House

Amherst, MA   01002

(413) 542-2380

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
Borrowers and Lenders 6.2

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.008  Monday, 9 January 2012

 

From:         Sujata Iyengar < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:          January 6, 2012 7:25:44 PM EST

Subject:      B&L 6.2 

 

The Editors are thrilled to announce the release of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation 6.2, featuring ground-breaking new work by Juliet Dusinberre on Wilfred Owen’s Macbeth (including illustrations of Owen's manuscript revisions to “On My Songs” and “Strange Meeting”); Laurie Osborne on the Outrageous Fortunes of Slings and Arrows; Ailsa Ferguson on the commodified body, Robert Mapplethorpe, and My Own Private Idaho; and reviews by Lisa Starks-Estes and Sheila Cavanagh. You can find current and previous issue at www.borrowers.uga.edu.

 

About the Journal:

Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, founded in 2005, is a peer-reviewed, online, multimedia Shakespeare journal and winner of the CELJ’s :Best New Journal” Award (2007). We are fully indexed in the World Shakespeare Bibliography, the Modern Language Association Bibliography, and other scholarly databases.

The editors of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation welcome original scholarship engaging with the afterlives of Shakespearean texts and their literary, filmic, multimedia, and critical histories. We encourage contributors to use the online format to its best advantage, in particular, by imagining how to enhance or illustrate their essays with multimedia (screen captures, sound clips, images, and so on). General issues appear in the Fall/Winter, and Special issues in the Spring/Summer, although the production schedule can vary. We welcome suggestions for themes for special issues.

 

General inquiries should be addressed to the General Editors, Christy Desmet and Sujata Iyengar, by email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or to Associate Editor Robert Sawyer at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Book reviewers may contact our book review editor, Joshua King, directly by email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Reviewers of Appropriations in Performance may contact our performance review editor, Matthew Kozusko, directly at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , for guidelines.

 

Special Issue: We are currently calling for papers for a special issue on “Shakespeare and African American Poetics,” in collaboration with the Langston Hughes Review, with “Poetics” understood broadly to encompass all forms of African American artistic and literary endeavor. Essays will be sent to both a Shakespearean and to an African Americanist for review. Send completed essays to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it by March 1, 2012. Queries are welcome and should be addressed to the General Editors.

 

Dr. Sujata IyengarPark Hall

Department of English

University of Georgia

Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
ASC: The 2012 Actors’ Renaissance Season

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.007  Monday, 9 January 2012

 

From:         Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:          Monday, 9 January 2012    

Subject:      ASC: The 2012 Actors’ Renaissance Season

 

American Shakespeare Center Announces The 2012 Actors’ Renaissance Season 

 

Much Ado about Nothing

STARTS JANUARY 6

In Much Ado about Nothing Shakespeare gives us the sparkling wit of Beatrice and Benedick and the heroic blunders of Dogberry and company.  He gives us the joy of love won and the ache of love lost.  As the villain Don John devises a scheme to shatter the wedding of young lovers Claudio and Hero, friends of Beatrice and Benedick conspire to trick them into admitting their much-denied love for one another.  In this powerful comedy, Shakespeare makes you laugh, but also breaks your heart - and magically puts it back together again.

 

Richard III

STARTS JANUARY 19

Richard III chronicles the cataclysmic end of England’s greatest power struggle, the Wars of the Roses.  Richard, as the play’s remarkable ringmaster, takes the audience into his confidence as he plots to kill everyone before him in line for the throne.  Being seduced by Richard’s shameless treachery is one of theatre-going's most delicious guilty pleasures.

 

Philaster, or Love Lies a-Bleeding

By Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

STARTS FEBRUARY 2

Blackfriars Premiere. Two love triangles dominate this beautiful, sexy, troubling, and surprising romance.  Two princes and a princess act recklessly, a king rules foolishly, and a curious youth loves hopelessly.  Loves lies bleeding in Beaumont and Fletcher’s dazzling fairy-tale for adults, but it does ultimately heal.

 

A Mad World, My Masters

By Thomas Middleton

STARTS FEBRUARY 23

Blackfriars Premiere. Middleton’s deliriously sinful comedy introduces the fabulous grifters Dick Follywit, a mad-brain trickster, and Frank Gullman, who turns out to be a resourceful courtesan. Money and sex, swindles and scams take center stage in the mad world of Jacobean London - with the unexpected possibility of true love in a most unlikely couple.

 

Dido, Queen of Carthage

By Christopher Marlowe

STARTS MARCH 14

Blackfriars Premiere. Arriving in Carthage after the fall of his beloved city, the Trojan hero Aeneas begins a passionate and dangerous love affair with Queen Dido.  Unknown to the lovers, the gods are pulling their strings - with disastrous results.  Part Antony and Cleopatra, part A Midsummer Night's Dream, and part The Tempest - Dido, Queen of Carthage is Marlowe’s ravishing take on Virgil’s Aeneid.

 

American Shakespeare Center 

10 S. Market St

Staunton, Virginia 24401

 
 
Folger Exhibition: The King James Bible

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.006  Monday, 9 January 2012

 

From:         Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:          Monday, January 9, 2012              

Subject:      Folger Exhibition: The King James Bible

 

 

Alpha and Omega

Folger Exhibitions: The King James Bible

 

Manifold Greatness, which tells the story of the creation of the King James Bible and the book’s ongoing cultural influence closes at the Folger this month. Explore the dynamic history of the King James Bible, from its roots in earlier English translations to its appearance in popular culture. Plus, exhibition curator Hannibal Hamlin dispels some famous King James Bible myths, and the interactive Read the Book feature allows you to read the text, listen to commentary, or hear recordings of selected passages. 

 

A traveling exhibition of Manifold Greatness will be on tour throughout the U.S. until 2013. Check the tour schedule to see if it’s coming to a city near you. 

 

Exhibition closes at the Folger January 16! 

Open Daily 

10am to 5pm, Monday through Saturday 

12pm to 5pm, Sunday

 

Free:

BlogWorthy: Myths Debunked

Interactive: Read the Book

Plan a Visit: Manifold Greatness Tour Schedule

 
 
Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England, Volume 24

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0356  Saturday, 31 December 2011

 

From:         Harry Keyishian < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         December 29, 2011 3:02:01 PM EST

Subject:      Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England, Volume 24

 

Volume 24 of Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England features a Symposium on Theatre History Resources, four articles, and eleven book reviews. The Editor of MaRDiE is S.P. Cerasano.  Mary Bly is Associate Editor and Heather Anne Hirschfeld is Book Review Editor.

 

Contents:

 

Symposium: Theatre History Resources

 

Hard Choices: A REED Editor Battles House Style, by Alan H. Nelson

 

From Patrons Web site to REED Online, by Sally-Beth MacLean and Alan Somerset

 

“If I could not liu by it & be honest”: Putting the Henslowe-Alleyn Manuscript Archive Online, by Grace Ioppolo

 

The Lost Plays Database: A Wiki for Lost Plays, by Roslyn L. Knutson and David McInnis

 

The John Nichols Project, by Jayne Elisabeth Archer and Elizabeth Goldring

 

Articles

 

Predicting Elizabeth: Prophecy on Progress, by Rachel Kapelle

 

Early Modern Banquet Receipts and Women’s Theatre, by Sara Mueller

 

The Theatre Historian as Director, by Alan C. Dessen

 

“A Wording Poet”:  Othello Among the Montebanks, by Bella Mirabella

 

Reviews: 

 

MaRDiE 24 contains reviews of recent books by Gustav Ungerer, Eric Griffin, Patricia A. Cahill, Jonathan Gil Harris, Richard Dutton, Adrian Streete, Richard Rowland, Hugh Craig and Arthur Kinney, Warren Stevenson, Judith Haber, and Marcus Nordlund.

 

MaRDiE is published under the imprint of Fairleigh Dickinson University Press by special arrangement with Associated University Presses, 10 Schalks Crossing Road, Suite 501-330, Plainsboro, NJ 08536.  Phone - 609-269-8094. Email:   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

Harry Keyishian, Director, FDU Press, 285 Madison Avenue, Madison NJ 07940. Phone: 9734438564.  Email:   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

____________________________________________________________

SHAKSPER: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List

Hardy M. Cook,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

The SHAKSPER Web Site <http://shaksper.net>

 

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

DONATION: Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER: shaksper.net.

 

 
Shakespeare Studies Volume XXXIX

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0353  Thursday, 29 December 2011

From:         Harry Keyishian < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         December 28, 2011 12:07:27 PM EST

Subject:      Shakespeare Studies Volume XXXIX

 

Volume XXXIX of Shakespeare Studies features a Forum on Shakespeare and Ecology, four articles, and sixteen book reviews.  Shakespeare Studies is edited by Susan Zimmerman and Garrett Sullivan.  Linda Neiberg is Assistant to the Editors.

 

Contents:

 

Foreword: Noel Martin, 1922-2009, by Leeds Barroll

Forum: Shakespeare and Ecology

 

Introduction, by Julian Yates and Garrett Sullivan

 

Economies of Nature in Shakespeare, by Jean E. Feerick

 

The Preternatural Ecology of “A Lover’s Complaint,” by Mary Floyd-Wilson

 

Shakespeare’s Globe and England’s Woods, by Vin Nardizzi

 

Ecosystemic Shakespeare: Vegetable Memorabilia in the Sonnets, by Joshua Calhoun

 

“To fright the animals and to kill them up”: Shakespeare and Ecology, by Sharon O’Dair

 

Shakespeare’s Beach House, or The Green and the Blue in Macbeth, by Steve Mentz

 

Cognitive Ecology as a Framework for Shakespearean Studies, by Evelyn Tribble and John Sutton

 

Shakespeare @ the Limits, by Bruce R. Smith

 

Articles

 

Venus on the Thames, by John H. Astington

 

The French Source of the Earliest Surviving Arabic Hamlet, by Margaret Litvin

 

When Hell Freezes Over: Mount Hecla and Hamlet’s Infernal Geography, by Kristin Poole

 

“To buy, or not to buy”: Hamlet and Consumer Culture, by Emma Smith

Reviews

 

SS XXXIX contains reviews of recent books by Janet Adelman, Julian Bowsher and Pat Miller, Margeta de Grazia, Frances E. Dolan, Valerie Forman, Barbara Fuchs, Timothy Hampton, Jeffrey Knapp, Carole Levin, Nina Livine and David Lee Miller, Monica Matei-Chesnoiu, Bruce R. Smith, Tiffany Stern, Jennifer Summit, and Gustav Ungerer.

 

Shakespeare Studies is published under the imprint of Fairleigh Dickinson University Press by special arrangement with Associated University Presses, 10 Schalks Crossing Road, Suite 501-330, Plainsboro, NJ 08536.  Phone - 609-269-8094. Email:   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

Harry Keyishian, Director, FDU Press, 285 Madison Avenue, Madison NJ 07940. Email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

 

 
Herb Coursen

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0333  Friday, 9 December 2011

 

[1] From:         Hugh J. Gorman <  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         December 8, 2011 3:31:00 PM EST

     Subject:     Herb Coursen 

   

[2] From:        Hardy M. Cook <  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         Friday, December 9, 11

     Subject:     Herb Coursen 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Hugh J. Gorman <  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         December 8, 2011 3:31:00 PM EST

Subject:      Herb Coursen

 

I write with the sad news that my friend and Shakespearean scholar H.R. Coursen passed away this week. I prolific poet and writer, Herb was one of our country’s foremost experts on all things involving the Bard particularly Shakespeare on film. A representative of the Globe Theatre in the US for many years, Herb was Chair of the English Department at Bowdoin College for many years. A fighter pilot during the Korean conflict, Herb passed suddenly at his home in Brunswick Maine.

 

Hugh Gorman

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hardy M. Cook <  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Friday, December 9, 2011

Subject:     Herb Coursen

 

Herb Coursen was another Shakespearean to whom I owe a debt of gratitude. 

 

Herb conducted the first SAA seminar I attended on Shakespeare and film in Boston, in which I presented the foundation of my thesis. He later included the resulting essay in Shakespeare on Television: An Anthology of Essays and Reviews, which he edited with James C. Bulman. He even cited some of my ideas in one of his essay. 

 

Herb had a reputation for going out of his way to help younger scholars, a loss to future generations of Shakespeareans.

 

Thanks, Herb. You will be missed.

 

Hardy

 
Radio Show

 

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0323  Tuesday, 6 December 2011

 

From:         Jack Heller < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         December 5, 2011 4:51:58 PM EST

Subject:      Radio Show

 

Colleagues,

 

I have had the privilege of being interviewed on the Northeast Indiana Public Radio about Shakespeare Behind Bars, the program many of you will recall from the 2005 documentary Shakespeare Behind Bars. Shakespeare Behind Bars continues apace with the inmates at the Luther Luckett Correctional Complex working towards their 2012 production of Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare Behind Bars also works young people in the juvenile justice system in Louisville, Kentucky, and SBB's founder Curt Tofteland has started a SBB program at the Ernest C. Brooks Correctional Complex in Michigan and has recently assisted the beginning of a Shakespeare program in a prison in Australia (while on a Fulbright Fellowship). My involvement is as an enthusiastic volunteer and promoter.

 

The radio interview includes the story of the man rehearsing to play Juliet. Enjoy: http://www.niprpodcasts.com/?p=673.

 

Jack Heller

 
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