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Special Issue of Early Theatre (Dec 2011)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0278  Thursday, 27 October 2011

From:         Helen M Ostovich < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 16, 2011 12:09:46 AM EDT

Subject:      Special Issue of Early Theatre (Dec 2011)

 

Forthcoming Special Issue of Early Theatre (14:2)

Circles and Circuits: Drama and Politics in the Midlands

 

Guest editors: Mary Polito and Amy Scott

 

In 2004, many scholars were aware of the book of four anonymous, undated manuscript plays held at Arbury Hall Warwickshire; very few had read them. In that year another manuscript version of one of those plays was discovered in the Special Collections Library at the University of Calgary. Led by scholars at Calgary, a team of national and international faculty and graduate students have been investigating the provenance and significance of these decidedly Caroline plays. They point to literary circles in the midlands, probable country house performances, careful political critiques of the personal rule and ‘circuits’ that pay heed to estates, the authority of patrons and the mobility of people and ideas.

 

Contents:

 

Kirsten Inglis and Boyda Johnstone          

‘The Pen lookes to be canoniz’d’: John Newdigate III, Author and Scribe   

 

Siobhan C. Keenan                

Staging Roman History, Stuart Politics, and the Duke of Buckingham: The Example of The Emperor’s Favourite   

 

Margaret Jane Kidnie            

Trying to be Diplomatic: Editing The Humorous Magistrate     

 

Louis A. Knafla                      

The Magistrate — and Humorous Magistrates — in Early Seventeenth-Century England        

 

Vimala C. Pasupathi              

Jockeying Jony: Horse-Racing and Regional Identity in The Humorous Magistrate   

 

Laura Estill                             

Politics, Poetry, and Performance: The Miscellaneous Contents of Arbury Hall MS 414   

 

Paul L. Faber                         

Imported Popular Song in The Humorous Magistrate: 'The Noble Acts of Arthur of the Round Table' and  'Come Heare, Lady Muses'

 

Owen Stockden                      

John Newdigate III, Gilbert Sheldon, and MS A414 106r            

 

Amy Scott                               

Events and Texts: The Prologues and Epilogues for the Arbury Hall 414 Plays         

 

Mary Polito                            

‘this rare Poetesse’: the Remains of Lady Jane Burdett

 

 

Dr H M Ostovich  < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Editor, Early Theatre

Professor, English and Cultural Studies

McMaster University

Hamilton ON L8S 4L9  

Canada

 
 
Stylistics and Shakespeare's Language

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0277  Thursday, 27 October 2011

From:         Mireille Ravassat < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 15, 2011 11:11:06 AM EDT

Subject:      Stylistics and Shakespeare's Language

 

Dear colleagues,

 

We are glad to inform you that Stylistics and Shakespeare's Language --

Transdisciplinary Approaches has been published by Continuum in the

Advances in Stylistics Series.

 

Editors: Mireille Ravassat (Valenciennes University, France) and Jonathan

Culpeper (Lancaster University, UK). See link below.

 

Table of contents

 

Introduction Mireille Ravassat and Jonathan Culpeper

 

Chapter 1: 'Strange deliveries': Contextualizing Shakespeare's First

Citations in the OED

Giles Goodland

 

Chapter 2: Shakespeare's Vocabulary: Did it Dwarf All Others?

Ward E. Y. Elliott and Robert J. Valenza

 

Chapter 3: A New Kind of Dictionary for Shakespeare's Plays: An Immodest Proposal

Jonathan Culpeper

 

Chapter 4: 'If I break time': Shakespearean Line Endings on the Page and

the Stage

Peter Kanelos

 

Chapter 5: Subject-Verb Inversion and Iambic Rhythm in Shakespeare's

Dramatic Verse

Richard Ingham and Michael Ingham

 

Chapter 6: Shakespeare's 'Short' Pentameters and the Rhythms of Dramatic Verse

Peter Groves

 

Chapter 7: Wholes and Holes in the Study of Shakespeare's Wordplay

Dirk Delabastita

 

Chapter 8: 'a thing inseparate/Divides more wider than the sky and

earth' - of Oxymoron in Shakespeare's Sonnets

Mireille Ravassat

 

Chapter 9: 'Rue with a difference': a Computational Stylistic Analysis of

the Rhetoric of Suicide in Hamlet

Thomas Anderson and Scott Crossley

 

10: Shakespeare's Sexual Language and Metaphor: a

Cognitive-Stylistic Approach

José L. Oncins-Martínez

 

Chapter 11: Cognitive Interplay: How Blending Theory and Cognitive Science

Reread Shakespeare

Amy Cook

 

More details and preview:

http://www.continuumbooks.com/books/detail.aspx?BookId=158639&SubjectId=989&Subject2Id=1655

 

Best regards,

Mireille Ravassat and Jonathan Culpeper

 
 
Korean Tempest Coming to DC, Nov 4-5

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0276  Thursday, 27 October 2011

From:         Alexander Huang < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 12, 2011 2:33:51 AM EDT

Subject:      Korean Tempest Coming to DC, Nov 4-5

 

The George Washington University in Washington, D.C., will host the renowned Korean director Oh Tae-suk and screen his award-winning production of The Tempest

 

Friday, November 4, 2011, 4 p.m.–6 p.m.: The Tempest, dir. Oh Tae-suk, Mokwha Company, Seoul, South Korea

 

OPENING REMARKS by DAVID SCHALKWYK, Director of Research, Folger Shakespeare Library, and Editor of Shakespeare Quarterly

 

Saturday, November 5, 2011, 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.: Colloquium on "Staging Korea"

 

EVENTS on both days are held in the Harry Harding Auditorium, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052  (nearest metro station: Foggy Bottom-GWU)

 

The event celebrates the beauty of Korean performance traditions. Distinguished scholars and directors will discuss performances in South Korea, North Korea and in the Korean Diaspora, and the internationalization of Korean theatre. The highlight of this year's event is the visit of Master Oh Tae Suk from Seoul (http://youtu.be/btv83vpFP_E), and on the eve of the Colloquium, the screening of his award-winning production of Shakespeare’s The Tempest (Herald Angel’s Award at the 2011 Edinburgh International Arts Festival), to be followed by a Q&A session. 

 

Co-sponsored by GW’s Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Institute for Ethnographic Research, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Department of Theatre and Dance, Film Studies Program, and Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute (MEMSI); the Korean Embassy; and the Korea Foundation. http://www.gwu.edu/~eall/hms

 

RSVP Lunch is served. This event is free and open to the public. Reservations are required for the Colloquium (but not for film screening). RSVP with your name, affiliation, address, and phone number, and e-mail to  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 
 
CFP: Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0275  Thursday, 27 October 2011

From:         Michele Marrapodi  < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 17, 2011 9:31:02 AM EDT

Subject:      Call for Papers

 

Call for Papers for the collection of essays:

Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition

 

Edited by

Michele Marrapodi

 

 

This new collection of essays aims to place the works of Shakespeare within the context of the European Renaissance and, more specifically, within the context of Italian cultural, dramatic, and literary traditions, with reference to the impact and influence of both classical and contemporary culture. In contrast with previous studies, often characterized by a positivistic-deterministic hermeneutics and, consequently, by a largely passive analysis of source material or literary topoi, the new critical perspective pursued in this volume will take into account a wider European intertextual dimension and, above all, an ideological interpretation of the ‘aesthetics’ or ‘politics’ of intertextuality which will allow the analysis of the presence of the Italian world in early modern England not as a traditional treasure trove of influence and imitation but as a potential cultural force, generating complex processes of appropriation, transformation, and ideological opposition throughout a continuous dialectical interchange of compliance and subversion.

 

Please send a 200-word abstract of the proposed chapter directly to the 

editor before 29 February 2012.

 

Prof. Michele Marrapodi

Dipt. (FIERI-AGLAIA) Filosofia, Filologia, Storia, Arti, Critica dei Saperi

Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia

Viale delle Scienze

90128 Palermo, Italy

Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 
The Lizz Ketterer Trust

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0247  Friday, 30 September 2011

From:         Will Sharpe < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 30, 2011 8:50:43 AM EDT

Subject:      The Lizz Ketterer Trust

 

Dear SHAKSPERians,

 

Donations can now be taken for our charitable trust set up to commemorate the passing of Dr Lizz Ketterer, who died tragically young earlier this year:

 

http://pledgie.com/campaigns/16076

 

We are performing Hamlet in her honour at the Shakespeare Institute next week, and hope very much that some of you who are unable to attend will nonetheless consider buying a virtual ticket to help us achieve our dream from afar. Please take a moment to look at our website, which tells all about our plans for the scholarship we wish to establish, and please consider either coming to the show or donating some money. Feel free to share this with anyone you think might be interested. We also have a Facebook page (link below), and the more people who know about us the better so please 'like' us and share our link on your profiles if you feel so inclined. If you have any inquiries about anything at all, please direct them to our email address, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

With best wishes and thanks to all,

Will Sharpe

 

http://www.lizzketterertrust.com/Home.html

 

https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/The-Lizz-Ketterer-Trust-Ketterers-Men/117085601727580

 
 
 
Hamlet in the Original Pronunciation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0244  Thursday, 29 September 2011

From:         Thomas M Lahey < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 23, 2011 12:01:28 PM EDT

Subject:      Hamlet in the Original Pronunciation, Univ of NV, Reno

 

Nevada Repertory Company announces

 

The World Premiere of William Shakespeare’s Hamlet in the Original Pronunciation

 

Nov. 1, 2 and 3 (Preview Performances), 7:30 p.m.

 

Nov. 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19, 7:30 p.m.

 

Nov. 6, 13 and 20, 1:30 p.m.

 

Redfield Studio Theatre

 

The theatre world will be watching — and listening — in awe when the University's world premiere of Hamlet in the Original Pronunciation (OP) hits the stage this fall. Amazingly, the last time Hamlet  was presented in its original dialect was literally centuries ago. In fact, only four OP productions of anything Shakespearean have been performed in modern times: two recently at The Globe Theatre in London, one at the University of Kansas, and one at Cambridge in the 1950s. And modern audiences have been delighted by how understandable the early language is, including the discovery of now-rhyming lines once lost to the ages (love/prove, eyes/qualities, etc.). In the University's remarkable international collaboration, a diverse group of world-class artists, directors, and scholars will come together to produce this world-class event: the great English linguist and The Globe's own consultant David Crystal, author of "Pronouncing Shakespeare"; British superstar actor and scholar Ben Crystal, who will play Hamlet; the University's award-winning Shakespearean scholar, this production's dramaturge, and co-editor of "The Royal Shakespeare Company's Complete Works of William Shakespeare," professor Eric Rasmussen; and the University's own renowned Nevada Repertory Company under the visionary leadership of director and department chair, Rob Gander. A once-in-a-lifetime event indeed — no matter how you say it! 

 

Preview Performances: Adult $10, ASUN $5 (limited quantity available)

 

All Other Shows: Adult $15, Senior $12, Local Student w/ID $10, UNR Student $5 (limited quantity available) 

 
 
Queen Undaunted: Margaret of Anjou

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0241  Thursday, 29 September 2011

From:         Jeannette Webber < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 23, 2011 4:18:00 PM EDT

Subject:      Queen Undaunted: Margaret of Anjou

 

[Editor’s Note: My apologies for not distributing this announcement in a timely manner. Nevertheless, I include it here as a record in the SHAKSPER archives. -Hardy]

 

Dear SHAKSPER Colleagues,

 

Unless you're in or near Santa Barbara CA this weekend, you won't be able to come, but it occurred to me belatedly that some of you would be interested in the show I wrote based on Margaret of Anjou. It's about 2/3 Shakespeare's words--which I identify on the script though listeners hopefully will find seamless with my 1/3: the structure and transitions. I've written various notes and student information sheets and there's an article about the script and production in the Friday, Sept 23 Santa Barbara News Press by Joe Hansen. Here's the listing:

 

Queen Undaunted: Margaret of Anjou, a one woman show featuring E. Bonnie Lewis of DramaDogs, directed by Ken Gilbert and Michelle A. Osborne and written by Jinny Webber, gives us Margaret according to Shakespeare, the only person to appear in four of his plays.  From her first appearance as a young French princess engaged to Henry VI of England to her defeated but unvanquished old self, we follow her through Henry VI, Parts 1, 2, and 3 and Richard III. Initially modest and girlish, she becomes ruthless, vengeful and fierce. She loves, she hates, she acts with intensity in a world where women were meant to be compliant and submissive--and quiet. Complex and ambiguous, her voice resonates down the ages. 

 

See www.centerstagetheater.org for more information.

 

Center Stage Theater: Paseo Nuevo Mall, Santa Barbara, California

September 24th Saturday Matinee 2 PM. All seats $10.

September 24th Saturday Evening 8 PM and September 25th Sunday Matinee 2 PM

 
 
The Lizz Ketterer Trust

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0237 Thursday, 22 September 2011

From:         Will Sharpe < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 21, 2011 4:42:47 AM EDT

Subject:      The Lizz Ketterer Trust

 

Dear Friends,

 

The link below advertises a production of Hamlet that we are performing at the Shakespeare Institute next month to raise funds to establish a scholarship in the name of our beloved friend, Dr Lizz Ketterer, who died tragically young earlier this year. Please take a moment to look at our website and consider either coming to the show or donating some money if it's not possible to make the trip here (and for some of you it clearly isn't). We are in the final stages of setting ourselves up as a registered charity and details will be shortly available of how donations can be made. Please feel free to share this with anyone you think might be interested. We also have a Facebook page (link below), and the more people who know about us the better so please 'like' us and share our link on your profiles if you feel so inclined. I could go on, but the website tells all. If you have any inquiries about anything at all, please direct them to our email address,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Many thanks to all,

Will

 

http://www.lizzketterertrust.com/Home.html

 

https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/The-Lizz-Ketterer-Trust-Ketterers-Men/117085601727580

 
 
Teaching the Early Modern Period

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0235  Monday, 19 September 2011

From:         Lowell Duckert < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Wednesday, 14 Sep 2011 14:05:36 -0400

Subject:      Teaching the Early Modern Period

 

Teaching the Early Modern Period 

Edited by Derval Conroy and Danielle Clarke

 

“This book is an excellent addition to materials on pedagogy not simply for the early modern period but in general. The range of responses is fittingly diverse and much thought has been put into designing a well-crafted and innovative collection. The key importance of the volume is its geographical, disciplinary, and cultural range. One of the great virtues of this book is its diversity, and it will appeal to scholars, postgraduates, and teachers in the UK, USA, Europe, and Australia.”—Jerome de Groot, University of Manchester, UK

 

Teaching the Early Modern Period is an innovative project that brings together leading early modernists drawn from a wide geographical and disciplinary background. Scholars from English, History, and French Studies unite in this unique volume to examine the challenges, and solutions to those challenges, which the early modern period provides in the third-level classroom. Nine essays are interspersed with fourteen shorter reflections by contributors from Ireland, the UK, France, the Netherlands, South Africa, Canada, and the USA; the volume hence provides a rare transcontinental insight into current pedagogical praxis in a number of Western national traditions, presenting a wide range of case-studies of how research can inform teaching from scholars who refuse to accept a divorce between the two.

 

 

CONTENTS:

 

Introduction; D. Clarke & D. Conroy

 

The Scholarship of Teaching the Early Modern: An Overview; D. Conroy

 

 

Part I: The Early Modern in the Digital Age

 

Renaissance Teaching and Learning: Humanist Pedagogy in the Digital Age and What It Might Teach Us; D. Clarke

 

Information Revolutions Past and Present, and Teaching the Early Modern Period; P. Dover

 

 

Part II: The Early Modern and Its Others

 

'Other voices': The Early Modern Past in Provincial America; J. Dewald

 

Exploring the Limits of the Thinkable; S. Stuurman

 

Lobola, the Intombi, and the Soft-Porn Centaur:  Teaching King Lear in the Post-Apartheid South African Classroom; D. Seddon

 

Windows of Gold; R. Whelan

 

A Renaissance Woman Adrift in the World; M. E. Wiesner-Hanks

 

Worlds Apart, Worlds Away: Integrating the Early Modern in the Antipodes; S. Broomhall

 

Paradise Regained? Teaching the Multicultural Renaissance; J. Grogan

 

Shakespeare and the Problem of the Early Modern Curriculum; A. Hadfield

 

 

Part III: The Early Modern in the Contemporary Classroom: Course Design and Classroom Practice

 

An Early Modern Challenge: Finding the Student In-Road; P. Cheney

 

Teaching Shakespeare Historically; M. Burnett

 

The Importance of Being Endogenous; A. Viala

 

Literature, Philosophy and Medicine: Strategies for an Interdisciplinary Approach to the Seventeenth Century; B. Höfer

 

Versailles; H. Goldwyn

 

Paradoxical Creativity: Using Censorship to Develop Critical Reading and Thinking; K. Waterson

 

T-shirt Day, Utopia and Henry VIII's Dating Service: Using Creative Assignments to Teach Early Modern History; C. Levin

 

The Importance of Boredom in Learning About the Early Modern; C. Sullivan

 

 

Part IV: Performing the Early Modern

 

French Seventeenth-Century Theatre: Saying is Believing; H. Phillips

 

Teaching Early-Modern Spectacle through Film: Exploring Possibilities,  Challenges, and Pitfalls through a French Corpus; G. Spielmann

 

Relevance and Its Discontents: Teaching Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette; A. Wygant

 

Presence, Performance, and Critical Pleasure: Play and Prerequisites in Research and Teaching; C. Biet

 

 

Derval Conroy is Lecturer in French at University College Dublin, Ireland. She has published extensively on women and women writers in seventeenth-century France.

 

Danielle Clarke is Associate Professor of English Renaissance Language and Literature at University College Dublin, Ireland. She has published widely on questions of gender, language, and representation in the early modern period.

 
CFP: Shakespeare and Performance

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0234  Monday, 19 September 2011

 

From:         Sarah Gail Farrell < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 15, 2011 12:04:15 PM EDT

Subject:      CFP: Shakespeare and Performance

 

Early Modern Studies Journal (EMSJ) formerly Early English Studies (EES) is an online journal under the auspices of the University of Texas, Arlington, English Department and is devoted to literary and cultural topics of study in early modern period. EES is published annually, peer-reviewed, and open to general submission.  

 

The 2012 issue will focus on Shakespeare and Performance.  We are interested in articles that consider any aspect of performance in historical or contemporary productions of Shakespeare and his contemporary playwrights.  The following list is of possible topics, but should not be considered exhaustive:

  • Comparative performance in England
  • Comparative performances in England and other countries
  • Street performance
  • Provincial performance
  • Performance of Guilds
  • Women and Performance
  • Boy’s companies
  • Current Productions of early modern plays
  • Shakespeare Festivals
  • Playing spaces
  • Actors and the text
  • Theatrical Gesture
  • Court Performances and Masques

Please submit double-spaced manuscripts in Times New Roman, 12 pt font that do not exceed thirty pages in length, including notes (9,000 words total); electronic submission in Word format is required.  Please use endnotes rather than a bibliography, formatting to Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Ed. The author’s name, affiliation, and academic history should be included on the first page of the document. Thereafter, the author’s name should not appear in the document. Submissions are due January 31, 2012. The issue will appear in Fall 2012. Please contact Dr. Amy Tigner at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it with any queries. 

 

Sarah Farrell

Review Editor

Early Modern Studies Journal

 
Original Pronunciation

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0230  Tuesday, 13 September 2011

 

From:         David Crystal < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:          September 13, 2011 4:24:55 AM EDT

Subject:      Original Pronunciation

 

This is to let colleagues know that a clearing-house site for productions and projects in original pronunciation went live this week. You can find it at http://www.originalpronunciation.com.

 

David Crystal

 
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