Announcements

Early Theatre 18.2 (2015)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.538  Tuesday, 24 November 2015

 

From:        Helen M Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 23, 2015 at 11:44:57 AM EST

Subject:    Early Theatre 18.2 (2015)

 

EARLY THEATRE 18.2 (2015)

This issue will be mailed out to subscribers and made available to subscribers online in December.  It is our last paper issue; starting with 19.1 (2016) ET/REED will become a digital journal only.  The Note and the Issues in Review section are of particular interest to scholars working on women in theatre.

 

Announcement of essay prize-winners  

 

Articles

An Acoustical Approach to the Study of the Wagons of the York Mystery Plays: Structure and Orientation

            Mariana Lopez

 

‘Here may we se a merveyl one’: Miracles and the Psalter in the N-Town ‘Marriage of Mary and Joseph’

            Frank Napolitano

 

From Court to Playhouse and Back: Middleton's Appropriation of the Masque

            Caroline Baird

 

‘I will keep and character that name’: Dramatis Personae Lists in Early Modern Manuscript Plays

            Matteo Pangallo          

 

Note

‘We have this day, expell’d our Men the Stage’: Dating the Prologue and Epilogue of The Parson’s Wedding

          Riki Miyoshi

 

Issues in Review

Early Modern Women Theatre Makers

            Contributing Editor: Elizabeth Schafer

 

Introduction: Attending to Early Modern Women as Theatre Makers

            Elizabeth Schafer 

 

Reproducing Iphigenia at Aulis

            Alison Findlay

 

Performing The Tragedy of Mariam and Constructing Stage History

            Ramona Wray

 

Daniel’s Cleopatra and Lady Anne Clifford: From a Jacobean Portrait to Modern Performance

            Yasmin Arshad, Helen Hackett, and Emma Whipday

 

A Performance Studies Approach to The Tragedy of Mariam

            Rebecca McCutcheon

 

Helen M Ostovich  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~english/Faculty/Ostovich.html

Founding Editor, Early Theatre <http://earlytheatre.org/>

Professor Emeritus, English and Cultural Studies

McMaster University

Canada

 

 

 

Critical Survey: New Issue

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.537  Tuesday, 24 November 2015

 

From:        Young Lee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 19, 2015 at 4:14:54 PM EST

Subject:    Critical Survey: New Issue

 

Dear Hardy Cook,

 

I am writing to you from Berghahn Journals, the publisher of Critical Survey (http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/cs/), a peer-reviewed literary studies journal that has dedicated many of its issues to Shakespeare. Our recent issue (Volume 27, Issue 1) would be of great interest to your email list. Would it be possible to post the TOCs to the list? I have attached it for you.

 

Other Issues of Interest:

 

Volume 26, Issue 3 http://berghahn.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/csurv/2014/00000026/00000003

 

Volume 26, Issue 2 - http://berghahn.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/csurv/2014/00000026/00000002

 

Volume 25, Issue 3 - http://berghahn.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/csurv/2013/00000025/00000003

 

Volume 25, Issue 1 - http://berghahn.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/csurv/2013/00000025/00000001

 

We also have a free virtual issue dedicated to Shakespeare. Please feel free to circulate this link to your members : 

http://bit.ly/Shakespeare-Issue

 


Best regards,

Young Lee

 

 Dear Colleague,

 

Berghahn Journals is pleased to announce that the latest issue of Critical Survey has been published. This issue explores the following topics: the sports and leisure activities of Lewis Carroll, ecofeminist critical thinking in William Shakespeare's female characters, how Shakespeare transforms his early picture of female virtue, examples of emotion and perception in a number of Shakespearean dramas, and Beckett's dramatic presentation of a face alone in the dark.

 

Please visit the Berghahn website for more information about the journal: www.journals.berghahnbooks.com/cs

 

 

Current Issue: Volume 27, Issue 1

 

ARTICLES

Aquatics, Play, and Eroticism: Beside the Seaside with Lewis Carroll

JOHN BALE

http://bit.ly/1jS6vn0

 

The Nature of Gender: Are Juliet, Desdemona and Cordelia to their Fathers as Nature is to Culture?

GORDANA GALIĆKAKKONEN  and ANA PENJACK

http://bit.ly/1N8YtBm

 

Going Rogue: Bianca at Large

ELIZABETH MAZZOLA

http://bit.ly/1RBZ6Tm

 

Compassionate Perception and Touching Experiences in Shakespearean Drama

ANNE SOPHIE REFSKOU

http://bit.ly/1OZB9rl

 

'of all things a face appeared': Reading Faces in Samuel Beckett's That Time

JOSHUA POWELL

http://bit.ly/1Wic5jM

 

 

Recommend Critical Survey to your library
As a key researcher in your field you can recommend Critical Survey to your library for subscription. A form for this purpose is provided on the Critical Survey website: http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/cs/?pg=recommend 

 

Free Sample Issue

View a free issue of Critical Survey here:

http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/cs/index.php?pg=sample
 
Free Online Trial:

To sign up for a free 60-day online trial to Critical Survey, please visit:

http://berghahn.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/csurv/trial 

 

Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

Contending with Shakespeare through Adaptation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.530  Friday, 6 November 2015

 

From:        Verena Theile <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 5, 2015 at 4:34:38 PM EST

Subject:    Re: Contending with Shakespeare through Adaptation

 

[Editor’s Note: The original posting of this CFP had the date incorrect. Below is a corrected version of that CFP. –Hardy]

 

CFP for edited collection, Contending with Shakespeare through Adaptation 

 

Chapter proposals are invited for a collection of essays that will explore Shakespearean adaptations as statements, often assertions about the nature of the work they engage. That adaptations have contributed to Shakespeare’s afterlife cannot be disputed. They are re-imaginings of his work in a new context and against a new medium, and, as such, adaptations of Shakespeare are derivative and unique at the same time. With that premise in mind, the history of Shakespeare in adaptation may also uncover the history of assumptions about what Shakespeare constitutes–as a playwright, poet, cultural icon, or otherwise. 

 

The collection we envision will take up adaptations and appropriations with a focus on what these new products reveal about Shakespeare’s parameters or limits. Accordingly, we seek essays that explore cases of appropriation that help bring these limitations to light and confront the implications of transposing Shakespeare to a particular situation or audience. Essays might consider, for example, unexpected failures in appropriation; critically controversial productions or editions; adaptations that explicitly address conflicts in Shakespeare’s reception; or any other instance where a particular appropriation of Shakespeare helped draw attention to unexamined preconceptions of his literary or cultural stature. 

 

Please submit enquiries, chapter proposals (500 words), or drafts of essays (7,500 words) to the editors Verena Theile (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and Adam Kitzes This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by December 1, 2015

 

 

 

This Rough Magic

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.529  Friday, 6 November 2015

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, November 6, 2015

Subject:    This Rough Magic

 

http://thisroughmagic.org/

 

This Rough Magic

A Peer-Reviewed, Academic, Online Journal

Dedicated to the Teaching of Medieval and Renaissance Literature 

 

This Rough Magic was co-founded in 2009 by Michael Boecherer and Bente Videbaek.

 

This Rough Magic is a journal dedicated to the art of teaching Medieval and Renaissance Literature. We are seeking academic, teachable articles. 

 

We are proudly listed on / indexed in the following:

We are seeking academic, teachable articles. Essays could focus on, but are not limited to, the following categories:

  • Authorship & Genre
  • Narrative Structure
  • Poetry/Drama
  • Epic/Nation/Empire
  • History
  • Religion/Superstition
  • Philosophy/Rhetoric
  • Race
  • Ethnicity
  • Gender & Sexuality
  • Art

 

Editorial Board Information

 

Editorial board members are affiliated with the following academic institutions and organizations:

 

Current Editors

 

If you are interested in joining This Rough Magic’s editorial staff, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">Michael Boecherer.

 

 

 

CFP: SWPACA, Shakespeare in Popular Culture Area

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.526  Thursday, 5 November 2015

 

From:        Jessica M Maerz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 5, 2015 at 12:05:58 PM EST

Subject:    CFP:  SWPACA, Shakespeare in Popular Culture Area

 

The following CFP may be of interest to SHAKSPER readers.

CFP:  Southwest Popular/American Culture Association

Shakespeare in Popular Culture

Albuquerque, NM

Feb. 10-13, 2016

DEADLINE EXTENDED

 

The Shakespeare in Popular Culture Area is now accepting proposals for the Southwest Popular / American Culture Association’s 37th annual conference, which will be held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel and Conference Center in Albuquerque, NM. We welcome proposals that treat the broad convergence of Shakespeare, pop culture, and mediatization.

 

Potential topics might include: global Shakespeares; inter- and cross-cultural Shakespeares (and his contemporaries); Shakespearean auteurs; digital Shakespeares; screen Shakespeares; Shakespeare and the digital humanities; and postmodern Shakespeares.

 

Please submit a 250 word proposal to conference2016.southwestpca.org by

November 15, 2015. Inquiries may be directed to Area Chair Jessica Maerz at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Details about the conference, including information about conference travel and graduate student awards, and Dialogue, SWPACA’s new journal, can be found at www.southwestpca.org.

 

_______________________________

Jessica M. Maerz

Assistant Professor of Theatre Studies

School of Theatre, Film, and Television

University of Arizona

 

 

  

Fargo Shakespeare Month

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.519  Tuesday, 3 November 2015

 

From:        Verena Theile <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 3, 2015 at 11:03:33 AM EST

Subject:    Fargo Shakespeare Month

 

Fargo, ND is hosting a community-wide celebration of Shakespeare during the month of February, 2016: www.winterartsfest.org

 

ShakespeareFest 2016 in FARGO ND

 

During the festival, artists of all disciplines will create and present work inspired by the festival’s celebrated artist, William Shakespeare. The WinterArts Festival is much more than an arts event. It turns the perceived injustice of our long, dark winter into a point of pride and participation for the whole community. It’s a unique opportunity for artists to engage with each other in the spirit of collaboration and to challenge each other artistically. Visit our the event-website (www.winterartsfest.org) to see all of the performances, concerts, happy hours, talks, readings, lectures, and other experiences that our creative community has planned. Plenary speakers include Douglas Lanier (University of New Hampshire) and Jennifer Roberts-Smith (University of Waterloo). 

 

 

CFP for edited collection, Contending with Shakespeare through Adaptation

 

Chapter proposals are invited for a collection of essays that will explore Shakespearean adaptations as statements, often assertions about the nature of the work they engage. That adaptations have contributed to Shakespeare’s afterlife cannot be disputed. They are re-imaginings of his work in a new context and against a new medium, and, as such, adaptations of Shakespeare are derivative and unique at the same time. With that premise in mind, the history of Shakespeare in adaptation may also uncover the history of assumptions about what Shakespeare constitutes–as a playwright, poet, cultural icon, or otherwise. 

 

The collection we envision will take up adaptations and appropriations with a focus on what these new products reveal about Shakespeare’s parameters or limits. Accordingly, we seek essays that explore cases of appropriation that help bring these limitations to light and confront the implications of transposing Shakespeare to a particular situation or audience. Essays might consider, for example, unexpected failures in appropriation; critically controversial productions or editions; adaptations that explicitly address conflicts in Shakespeare’s reception; or any other instance where a particular appropriation of Shakespeare helped draw attention to unexamined preconceptions of his literary or cultural stature. 

 

Please submit enquiries, chapter proposals (500 words), or drafts of essays (7,500 words) to the editors Verena Theile (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and Adam Kitzes This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by December 1, 2016

 

Verena Theile

Associate Professor of English

Dean's Fellow/College of AHSS

NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY

 

 

 

Francis Yates CFP: A Celebration of Her Life and Work

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.515  Monday, 2 November 2015

 

From:        Paul Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 30, 2015 at 2:25:19 PM EDT

Subject:    Francis Yates CFP: A Celebration of Her Life and Work

 

https://kingstonshakespeareseminar.wordpress.com/2015/10/24/frances-yates-a-celebration-of-her-life-and-work-cfp/

 

FRANCES YATES: A CELEBRATION OF HER LIFE AND WORK

 

ROSE THEATRE: KINGSTON

 

SATURDAY APRIL 30, 2016

 

The great Renaissance and Shakespeare scholar Frances Yates lived for over half a century at Claygate, near Kingston-upon-Thames, and to mark the 50th anniversary of her book The Art of Memory, Kingston Shakespeare Seminar will host a one-day conference on her life and work at the Rose: a playhouse inspired by her theory of the ‘theatre of the world’. Close to where Yates wrote her books, participants will be asked to evaluate their current significance, and to reflect on her ideas about Europe, empire, occult philosophy, academies, architecture, memory, performance, intellectual history, and the place of a scholarly community in the modern world.

 

Proposals are invited for 25-minute papers that address these or other aspects of the life and career of Frances Yates. Submissions should be made by February 1 2016 to:

 

Professor Richard Wilson,

The Rose Theatre, 

24-6 High Street, 

Kingston-upon-Thames, KT1 1HL

r.wilson@kingston.ac.uk

 

 

 

Blackfriars Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.510  Tuesday, 27 October 2015

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Subject:    Blackfriars Conference

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

Later this afternoon, I leave for the Blackfriars Conference, driving through the Shenandoah Valley during the loveliest time of its year—fall with its brightly colored leaves.

 

I am taking my laptop with me, but it has been acting funny. I believe I have fixed it now, but tomorrow is another story. I will strive to get out Newsletters, as I am able. If I am not able, I will return by Monday November 2.

 

I hope to see many of you there.

 

 

Hardy

 

KiSSiT: Shakespeare and the State of Exception

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.503  Monday, 26 October 2015

 

From:        Paul Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 25, 2015 at 9:11:10 AM EDT

Subject:    KiSSiT: Shakespeare and the State of Exception 

 

https://kingstonshakespeareseminar.wordpress.com/2015/09/23/kissit-shakespeare-and-the-state-of-exception-cfp/

 

 

Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS)

 

KiSSiT: SHAKESPEARE AND THE STATE OF EXCEPTION CFP

 

Following the success of its conference on ‘Shakespeare and Waste’, Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory seeks participants for a one-day conference on ‘Shakespeare and the State of Exception’ to be held on Saturday 19 December, 2015 at the Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames.

 

The concept of ‘the state of exception’, associated with Carl Schmitt’s book Political Theology (1922), and recently revisited by Giorgio Agamben in The State of Exception (2005), refers to the total or partial suspension of the juridical order.

 

Far from being a mere footnote in legal studies, ‘the state of exception’ became the basis for the notorious Article 48 of the Weimar Constitution, which Hitler used to authorise a twelve year state of emergency in Nazi Germany, starting on March 23, 1933.

 

Schmitt theorised that such a suspension of law is intimately connected with a concept of sovereignty whose origin is not merely political, but also religious. He called this ‘political theology’.

 

‘Political theology’ has had a long and important history in Shakespeare studies beginning with Ernst Kantorowicz’s The King’s Two Bodies: A Study in Mediaeval Political Theology and Walter Benjamin’s Origin of the German Tragic Drama.

 

Literary critics such as Julia Reinhard Lupton, Debora Shuger, Victoria Kahn, Richard Wilson, and Eric L. Santner have recently revitalised and deepened the discussion of ‘political theology’ in the Renaissance, to explore the relationship between sovereignty, religion, citizenship, and state sanctioned violence in Earl Modern Europe in light of theoretical contributions by Michel Foucault, Hannah Arendt, Jacques Derrida, and Giorgio Agamben.

 

Regarding—or disregarding—this context, we invite abstracts for 20-minute presentations on the topic of Shakespeare and the state of exception. Papers might consider, but are not limited to, the following topics and questions:

  • Exploration of ontological or political ‘states’ of exceptionality and exceptionality in general in the works of Shakespeare.
  • State or status of exceptionality as an epistemological or ethical category, for example otherness in adaptations and performances of Shakespeare, perhaps in relation to the 21st century discourse on immigrants and refugees.
  • How is Shakespeare’s unique status as playwright entangled with issues of sovereignty and exceptionality? Consider, for example, Danny Boyle’s use of Shakespeare during the Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Summer Olympic Games or the famous copy of Shakespeare’s Complete Works, called the Robben Island Bible, inscribed by Nelson Mandela in prison.
  • The ‘state of exception’ is often described according to an apparent contradiction: it is a ‘suspension of the juridical order’ that is contained within that very order. How might Shakespeare’s conception of the Early Modern state be analysed in light of this complex topographical (inside / outside) metaphor?
  • The concept of ‘necessity’ is, according to Agamben, frequently asserted as the foundation for the ‘state of exception’. Consider the concept of ‘necessity’ in relation to law, nature, and human action in the Early Modern period and in Shakespeare.
  • Consider Early Modern political culture in relation to torture, surveillance, and extrajudicial imprisonment. How might these insights shed light on the continued ‘state of exception’ which justifies the ‘detainment’ of political prisoners in Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp without due process?
  • Did sex offences in the Early Modern period produce a state of ‘exception’ in perpetrator and victim? Consider, for example, The Rape of Lucrece and its relationship both to suicide and the founding of Rome. Can such exceptionality give us insight into contemporary exceptional legal language surrounding sex offences, sex offender registries, and indefinite detention of sex criminals?

Please submit abstracts and brief CVs by emailing the organizers at kingstonshakespeareintheory@gmail.com before Friday 13 November, 2015.

 

Conference oganizers: Paul Hamilton, Timo Uotinen.

Further information: kingstonshakespeareintheory@gmail.com and kingstonshakespeareseminar.wordpress.com.

 

Paul Hamilton 

PhD Shakespeare Institute, 

University of Birmingham 

 

 

 

Shakespeare and Ecocritical Theory

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.500  Friday, 23 October 2015

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, October 23, 2015

Subject:    Shakespeare and Ecocritical Theory

 

Gabriel Egan’s Shakespeare and Ecocritical Theory, a work in the Shakespeare and Theory Series, Editied by Evelyn Gajowski, has just been published.

 

http://bloomsbury.com/uk/series/shakespeare-and-theory/

 

Shakespeare and Theory

Series Editor: Evelyn Gajowski

 

This series provides a comprehensive analysis of the theoretical developments that have dominated Shakespeare studies since the advent of postmodernism, as well as those that are emerging at the present moment.

 

Each volume provides a clear definition of a particular theory; explains its key concepts; surveys its major theorists and critics; situates it in the context of contemporary political, social, and economic developments; analyses its significance in Shakespeare studies; and offers a wealth of suggested resources for further investigation

 

Shakespeare and Ecocritical Theory

By: Gabriel Egan

 

About Shakespeare and Ecocritical Theory

 

Combining the latest scientific and philosophical understanding of humankind’s place in the world with interpretative methods derived from other politically inflected literary criticism, ecocriticism is providing new insights into literary works both ancient and modern. With case-study analyses of the tragedies, comedies, histories and late romances, this book is a wide-ranging introduction to reading Shakespeare in the light of contemporary ecocritical theory. - See more at: http://bloomsbury.com/uk/shakespeare-and-ecocritical-theory-9781441145529/#sthash.jLl66srk.dpuf

 

Table of Contents

 

Series Editor’s Preface 

 

Introduction: Done and Undone 

 

1 The Rise of Ecocriticism 

 

2 Shakespeare and the Meaning of 'Life' in the Twenty-first Century 

 

3 Animals in Shakespearian Ecocriticism

 

4 Crowds and Social Networks in Shakespeare 

 

Conclusion

 

Index - See more at: http://bloomsbury.com/uk/shakespeare-and-ecocritical-theory-9781441145529/#sthash.jLl66srk.dpuf

 

 

 

Death of Tom Berger

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.499  Friday, 23 October 2015

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, October 23, 2015

Subject:    Death of Tom Berger

 

Many of you may have heard already, but for those who have not. Tom Berger died a few weeks ago. He was a friend to many of us both personally and though his work. Tom was also highly active in the Malone Society. Here is the Malone Society’s official announcement of his death.

 

http://malonesociety.com/blog/

 

Professor Thomas L. Berger

 

It was with deep sadness that members of Council received the news, at their meeting on October 17th, of the death of Professor Thomas L. Berger the previous week.

 

Tom Berger became Malone Society Treasurer for the United States (a position he held for nearly thirty years) at a particularly turbulent period in the Society’s affairs. The chaos into which the Society had fallen in the early 1970s had been restored to a degree of order in America through the sterling work of Professor G. E. Bentley, but it fell to Tom, as his successor, to return the US sphere of the Society’s activities to their once-flourishing state. Characteristically, he brought not only considerable energy and enthusiasm to the task, but a whimsical humour designed to attract younger scholars to an organization associated with scholarship of the most exacting (and superficially uninviting) kind. It is to Tom that we owe the ‘Malone Ranger’ badges and Tee shirts (the latter recently revived), the ‘Malone Society Fun Run’, and a host of highly inventive conference stalls acquainting the uninitiated with the joys of belonging to a quirky, dynamic and highly idiosyncratic organization. For those of us who worked with him he was a tower of strength on a range of fronts – ready to conjure up money when needed, to offer advice as we confronted a host of problems arising from the Society’s near-demise, and to bring his own scholarly expertise into play in the editing of three of our publications (and making a signal contribution to a fourth). He was a relaxed presence at Council meetings on his visits to England, a witty and charming correspondent, and a firm believer in the value of the Society’s work. We shall miss him very much.

 

 

 

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Make a Gift to SHAKSPER

Consider making a gift to support SHAKSPER.