Announcements

Extended Deadline Asian Shakespeare Association Biennial Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.189  Tuesday, 24 May 2016

 

From:        Yukari Yoshihara <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 12, 2016 at 2:22:05 AM EDT

Subject:    Extended Deadline Asian Shakespeare Association Biennial Conference

 

Dear all,

 

Apologies for cross posting. 

 

Asian Shakespeare Association is to extend the deadline for proposal submission to May 31, 2016. 

 

I would appreciate if you can circulate the attached revised CFP among those who can be interested. Seminar proposals are especially welcome.

 

Thank you.

 

Yukari Yoshihara

Secretary

ASA

 

 

Call for Papers

 

Asian Shakespeare Association Biennial Conference, 1-3 Dec 2016, New Delhi, India.

 

‘All the World is his Stage: Shakespeare Today’ 

 

There is no doubt that Shakespeare has occupied the stages of the world: his works are read, translated and performed in most languages of the world. Intercultural and intermedial appropriation is the order of the day, his works continue to issue forth in protean and surprising forms. The world has embraced Shakespeare as no other author before or after. He inhabits all literatures and cultures. This conference would like to celebrate, document and debate this world-wide spread of Shakespeare: how and why do people continue to recourse to his plays and poems? What meanings do they make more than 400 years after they were written? Are these versions of the same Shakespeare or do both local and global Shakespeare exist simultaneously? Is it possible or even desirable to reclaim our man from Stratford? 

 

The conference invites papers (20 mins.), panels (3-4 papers), especially seminars and workshops which address diverse aspects of these and related topics such as: 

 

•The secrets of Shakespeare’s success
•The most popular versus unpopular plays 

•Ebbs and flows of Shakespeare’s reputation

•Role of politics / culture / globalization / gender in the spread of Shakespeare

•Negotiating past and present, local and global Shakespeares
•The metaphorics of the world and stage in Shakespeare’s time and ours
•Performing trends and the popularization of Shakespeare

•Critical theory and the promotion of Shakespeare Studies 

 

Please send a 250 word abstract with a short bio-data by 31 May 2016 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Book Announcement: Shakespeare’s Symmetries

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.188  Tuesday, 24 May 2016

 

From:        James Ryan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 11, 2016 at 11:14:38 AM EDT

Subject:    Book Announcement: Shakespeare’s Symmetries

 

I am pleased to announce the publication of my book, Shakespeare’s Symmetries: The Mirrored Structure of Action in the Plays.

 

The book demonstrates that the mature plays are structured chiastically (ABCDCBA), usually with thematic actions as the repeated elements, one to each scene. Shakespeare’s use of chiasmus in sentences, speeches and scenes has been widely remarked, and some chiastic pairings between scenes have been noticed, especially when those pairs flank the central scene: the murders of Caesar and Cinna in Julius Caesar, Coriolanus’s two denunciations of the tribunes in Coriolanus, the wrong choices of Portia’s first two suitors in The Merchant of Venice, etc. This mirrored pairing of actions occurs not only in the central flanking scenes but between all corresponding scenes of the first and second halves of mature plays. The basis of the pairing is not always obvious, for the completed, repeated or contrasting actions may be reported or narrated rather than enacted. For example, Cominius is embraced by Coriolanus in one early scene and in the corresponding later scene reports that he has been rebuffed by Coriolanus. And in some later plays the connection is even less evident. In Cymbeline, for instance, the change in Posthumus is expressed metaphorically: he is a “flyer” in the third scene and a “stander” in the third-last scene.  The structure has gone unnoticed because of the subtlety of the reflections.

 

This arch-like thematic structure resolves a number of perennial problems, including questions of scene division, the number and placement of scenes, and the structural logic of puzzling plays like Cymbeline. The “thematic arch” explains, for example, the scene divisions in Folio Measure for Measure, Folio 2 Henry IV and other plays whose scene designations are routinely changed. It also suggests—to take one other vexing issue—that the twenty-seven scenes of Folio Macbeth should remain unchanged and that the first Hecate scene contains a non-Middletonian portion that reflects Macbeth’s speech in the corresponding scene and should therefore be retained. Most importantly, the thematic arch illuminates Shakespeare’s constructive practice and reveals the underlying consistency even of such apparently dissimilar works as A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Antony and Cleopatra.

 

The book is available from McFarland & Company. (http://www.mcfarlandpub.com/book-2.php?id=978-1-4766-6370-8). 

 

James Ryan 

 

 

 

Explanation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.187  Tuesday, 24 May 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Subject:     Explanation

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

I was hoping that I could quietly be out of commission and return without any fuss. Unfortunately, that was not the case, so let me offer an explanation and plead that if you are so inclined to hold off sending me any messages about this matter.

 

On Thursday, May 12, I had a rather complex surgery with two surgeons on my right foot. Although the procedure was to my mind amazing, out of good taste, I spare you the details. I spent the night and the next day in the hospital. I was told I could put no weight on my foot, so I spent the time from Friday until yesterday in the lower level of my house in my zero gravity chair with my foot elevated above my heart. Yesterday, I saw both surgeons who gave me permission occasionally to climb stair so I could finally get to my computer. 

 

There were also some issues with Google Domains, but I think we have solved those problems now.

 

I am back until June 9 when I fly to England for a week again, that is, depending on whether I will require another minor surgery to complete the job.

 

To save my energy in constructing the Newsletter and your energy in reading that Newsletter, I will distribute the announcements today and the other submissions tomorrow. 

 

Hardy M. Cook

Editor of SHAKSPER

 

PS: In reviewing the announcements, I seem to have inadvertently deleted one submissions. If send in an announcement and do not see it in today’s Newsletter, please re-send and accept my apologies.

 

 

 

Please RESEND Recent Submissions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.182  Tuesday, 10 May 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Subject:     Please RESEND Recent Submissions

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

My deepest apologies! Somehow I managed erase or misplace all of the submissions that arrived since Saturday May 7, 2016.

 

Please RESEND them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and I will get them out promptly.

 

Hardy

 

 

 

 

Podcast on Shakespeare and Economic Theory

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.177  Thursday, 5 May 2016

 

From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 5, 2016 at 5:21:04 AM EDT

Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and Economic Theory

 

https://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/2016/05/05/shakespeare-and-contemporary-theory-22-shakespeare-and-economic-theory-with-david-hawkes/

 

How are money, the marketplace, and questions of economic exchange relevant to studying Shakespeare? To find out, Neema interviews David Hawkes, author of Shakespeare and Economic Theory for the Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series.   

 

 

 

Length of Posts

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.172  Wednesday, 4 May 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Subject:    Length of Posts

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

It has been suggested to me again that there be a limit on the number of words in each submission.

 

Yesterday’s Newsletter had some very on posts, and I myself was responsible for not editing down one that was submitted to me from an outside source. 

 

I have no intention of counting words; however, like pornography I know a long post when I see it. Form now on, excessively long submissions will be returned, and the submitter will be asked to shorten it before I will distribute it to the list.

 

Sincerely,

Hardy M. Cook

Editor of SHAKSPER

 

 

 

Romantic Illustration Network: Fred Burwick, ‘Staging Shakespeare’

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.163  Tuesday, 3 May 2016

 

From:        <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 3, 2016 at 10:25:10 AM EDT

Subject:    Romantic Illustration Network: Fred Burwick, ‘Staging Shakespeare’

 

Romantic Illustration Network: Fred Burwick, ‘Staging Shakespeare’, Public Lecture at Westminster Archives July 19th 2016 

 

Romantic Illustration Network http://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/

 

‘Staging Shakespeare: picturing Shakespeare’s plays in the 18th and 21st centuries’. 

 

Professor Frederick Burwick, University of California Los Angeles

Tuesday 19th July 2016
6.30pm - 8pm


City of Westminster Archives Centre, 

10 St Ann’s St, 

London, SW1P 2DE

 

Join us for an event to celebrate Shakespeare’s 400th Anniversary, with a free public lecture followed by a wine reception (sponsored by the British Association for Romantic Studies). 

 

Download the poster at https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2016/05/03/rin-event-fred-burwick-staging-shakespeare-public-lecture-at-westminster-archives-july-19th-2016/.

 

Frederick Burwick will share his expert knowledge of the Boydell Shakespeare Gallery, opened in Pall Mall in 1789. The talk will examine the extent to which any of the scenes in the Boydell Gallery might be presumed to represent how Shakespeare was actually performed during the period, and also consider present-day models of representation.

 

Prints from the Gallery will be on view, as well as a display about Shakespeare.

 

Places are limited so early bookings are advised: RSVP to City of Westminster Archives Centre, 10 St Ann’s St, London, SW1P 2DE
Tel: 020 7641 5180
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Mary L. Shannon (FHEA)

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Department of English and Creative Writing

University of Roehampton  

 

 

 

CFP: Minor Shakespeares: The Politics and Aesthetics of the Margins

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.159  Friday, 29 April 2016

 

From:        Simon Ryle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 29, 2016 at 3:18:01 AM EDT

Subject:    Minor Shakespeares Conference, 23rd-24th Sept. 2016, University of Split, Croatia

 

Minor Shakespeares Conference, 23rd-24th Sept. 2016, University of Split, Croatia

 

Conference Call for Papers:

 

Minor Shakespeares: The Politics and Aesthetics of the Margins

 

University of Split, Croatia

 

23rd-24th September, 2016

 

Keynote lectures: Peter Greenaway and Prof. Richard Wilson

 

 

For Deleuze and Guattari there are modes of literature that offer themselves to the state, to official and institutional discourse, and thus to the hierarchically transcendent. These reactionary forms are to be contrasted with the resistant, revolutionary, and immanent ‘lines-of-flight’ of ‘minor literature’.

 

At first glance it might seem disingenuous to link minor literature with the author at the undisputed centre of the English canon. Certainly there is a repressive, deathly and conservative Shakespeare. But there is also a Shakespeare of the margins, uncanniness and resistance. This is in part due to the situation of early modern theatre. Unlike the central place accorded to Athenian theatre, the early modern London theatres were situated in the liminal Liberties beyond the jurisdiction of the city fathers. Writing away from the centres of political power, this spatial marginality was continually reinscribed as political subversion. But this politics of the margin is all-too-frequently forgotten, repressed, or mislaid. As Peter Greenaway’s filmmaking and Richard Wilson’s criticism likewise show, holding open the lines-of-flight for alternative Shakespearean meanings has involved reading against the grain, with the help of digital technologies, avant-gardism, French theory, recusant Catholicism, or other minority discourses. It is the task of the present to draw out this ‘foreignness in its own language’ at the ‘heart of great literature’, as Deleuze and Guattari put it, so as to ‘extract from the

text its revolutionary force’.

 

This conference considers marginality in Shakespeare’s poetry and drama, as well as the weird and alternative afterlives that arise from Shakespeare’s writing. Possible topics include, but are certainly not limited to:

 

* Ecological, politicized, feminist, postcolonial, queer, impaired, and other marginal or 'othered' readings of the Shakespeare text;

 

* Discourses of the strange, marginal or uncanny: alterity in early modern culture;

 

* Intensive affects: violence, horror, terror, or abjection in, or from, Shakespeare's writing;

 

* Temporal marginality: hauntings or futural anticipations in Shakespeare's poetry and narrative structures;

 

* Shakespeare and technology: print, cinema, electronic, digital media or media archaeology;

 

* Adaptation, performance, interpretation and translation across cultures, geographies and historical periods;

 

* Shakespeare read from the margins, from the discourses of classicism, medievalism, modernism, theology, sociology, psychoanalysis, cognitive science, aesthetic theory, the natural sciences, computational analysis, the medical humanities, political philosophy, or (bio)politics.

 

http://www.ffst.unist.hr/znanost/konferencije/weird_shakespeare

 

Please send abstracts of about 200 words to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 31st July 2016.

 

 

 

WSC 2016 - Postgraduate student and plus one registration - now open

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.139  Friday, 22 April 2016

 

From:        Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 22, 2016 at 11:49:45 AM EDT

Subject:    WSC 2016 - Postgraduate student and plus one registration - now open

 

Postgraduate Student and Plus One Registration Now Open

 

Postgraduate student registration

 

We have now opened registration for a limited number of discounted postgraduate student registration places at a rate of just £220.

 

This registration fee includes all benefits of the full price Congress registration, including:

  • Entry to plenary sessions in both Stratford-upon-Avon and London
  • Entry to panel sessions in both Stratford-upon-Avon and London
  • Attendance to both of the welcome receptions - in Stratford-upon-Avon this will be at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre, and in London at the British Library

For further information, and to register for a postgraduate student place, please visit - 

www.wsc2016.info/attend-wsc2016/register-for-wsc-2016. Registration for postgraduate places will close on Sunday 15 May 2016. 

 

Please note - we are aware that there may be postgraduate students who have already registered and paid the full Congress fee. The Congress Committee will be happy to part-refund a limited number of spaces (e.g. if the full price Congress fee of £375 was paid, the Committee will refund £155).

 

If you are a student, and have already paid the full fee, please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We require a letter from your supervisor to confirm your status as a current postgraduate student; please send this along with your email when you contact us. We will not able to process a part-refund without a letter from your supervisor. This letter must include:

  • Student’s full name
  • The name of the student’s institution
  • The course being studied
  • Expected course completion date.

Plus one registration

 

The committee also recognises that delegates may travel to the Congress with partners/ friends/ companions, who you may wish to bring along to certain parts of the programme. We would therefore like to offer registration for this. 

 

A limited number of ‘Plus one’ registration places are available at a rate of £80+VAT. This provides access to:

  • The welcome reception at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre, on Sunday 31 July 2016
  • The welcome reception at the British Library, on Thursday 4 August 2016

 

Please note - guests who have not registered as a ‘Plus one’ will not be allowed access to the welcome receptions, or any other part of the Congress programme. ‘Plus one’ registration is open to registered delegates only. Delegates are able to register only one guest through ‘Plus one’ registration. You will need to enter your registration number in order to register a plus one. ‘Plus one’ registration includes access to those events listed above only. This does not provide access to the rest of the Congress programme.

 

For further information, and to register a plus one, please visit - www.wsc2016.info/attend-wsc2016/register-for-wsc-2016. Registration for 'Plus one' places will close on Sunday 15 May 2016.

 

Stay informed


In order to keep up to date with latest Congress developments, please follow us on Twitter @WSCongress2016 and check our news feed at www.wsc2016.info/category/news.

 

If you have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact us on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We will be happy to help.

 

Kind regards,

The World Shakespeare Congress 2016 Committee

 

 

 

Studio 360: All Shakespeare All the Time

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.137  Wednesday, 20 April 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Subject:    Studio 360: All Shakespeare All the Time

 

http://www.wnyc.org/story/all-shakespeare-all-the-time/

 

On the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, we look at the ways his work continues to change and adapt to the culture we live in. In the 19th century, Shakespeare’s work got caught up in minstrel shows — and African-American actors are still struggling to claim the Bard as their own. Also, we find out how a father-son team is changing the way Shakespeare sounds by bringing back his original pronunciation. And we go inside the pioneering immersive theater experience “Sleep No More,” which might be the longest-running Shakespeare adaptation ever.

 

 

ABOUT STUDIO 360

 

 

The Peabody Award-winning show and podcast about creativity, pop culture, the arts and ideas hosted by novelist and journalist (and “Spy” magazine co-founder) Kurt Andersen. Email the show at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Produced by PRI and WNYC.

 

CFP MAPACA Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.134  Tuesday, 19 April 2016

 

From:        Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 19, 2016 at 10:05:21 AM EDT

Subject:    CFP MAPACA Conference

 

Beowulf to Shakespeare

 

The wealth of material found in the Middle Ages and Renaissance continues to attract modern audiences with new creative works in areas such as fiction, film, and computer games, which make use of medieval and/or early modern themes, characters, or plots. This is a call for papers or panels dealing with any aspect of medieval or Renaissance representation in popular culture. Topics for this area include, but are not limited to the following:

 

-Modern portrayals of any aspect of Arthurian legends or Shakespeare

 

-Modern versions or adaptations of any other Medieval or Renaissance writer

 

-Modern investigations of historical figures such as Eleanor of Aquitaine, The Richards, Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, Mary Queen of Scotts

 

-Teaching medieval and Renaissance texts to modern students

 

-Medieval or Renaissance links to fantasy fiction, gaming, comics, video games, etc.

 

-Medieval or Renaissance Dramas

 

-The Middle Ages or Renaissance on the Internet

 

-Renaissance fairs

 

Panel and Workshop proposals are also welcome.

 

Submit a 250 word proposal including A/V requests and a brief biography by June 30, 2015 to our online submission form at mapaca.net

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us directly

 

Diana Vecchio This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mary Behrman This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Co-Chairs Beowulf to Shakespeare 

 

Annalisa Castaldo

Associate Professor of English

Widener University

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

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