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British Council Literature Seminar Webcast

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.056  Thursday, 30 January 2014

 

From:        Julia Crockett < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 30, 2014 at 6:31:57 AM EST

Subject:    British Council Literature Seminar Webcast

 

‘Shakespeare Our Contemporary?’ 

http://www.britishcouncil.de/webcast

 

“Shakespeare – Our Contemporary?” 30 January to 1 February 2014

Watch our live webcast from the British Council Literature Seminar in Berlin.

 

Live readings and discussions with authors Naomi Alderman, A S Byatt, Howard Jacobson, Tom McCarthy, Alice Oswald, Mark Ravenhill and Polly Stenham to celebrate the 450th anniversary of the birth of William Shakespeare. Chair of the seminar is Professor John Mullan (Guardian Book Club).

 

Webcast schedule

Thursday, 30 January 2014

- from 19.30 CET: Welcome speeches by Dr Helen Müller (Bertelsmann) and John Whitehead (Director British Council Germany); Keynote: Dame Gail Rebuck, CBE (Chair Penguin Random House UK Board); Graham Sheffield (Director Arts British Council)

- followed by Howard Jacobson reading and discussion with John Mullan

Friday, 31 January 2014

- 10.00 – 11.15 CET: Alice Oswald, reading and discussion with John Mullan; followed by a Q&A session

- 11.45 – 13.00 CET: Polly Stenham, reading and discussion with John Mullan; followed by a Q&A session

- 14.30 – 15.45 CET: Panel discussion with Naomi Alderman, A S Byatt, Howard Jacobson, Alice Oswald, Mark Ravenhill, and Polly Stenham, Chaired by John Mullan

- 20.00 – 21.30 CET: A S Byatt, reading and discussion with Tobias Döring (Chairman of Germany’s Shakespeare Society)

Saturday, 1 February 2014

- 10.00 – 11.15 CET: Naomi Alderman, reading and discussion with Tobias Döring; followed by a Q&A session

- 11.45 – 13.00 CET: Tom McCarthy, reading and discussion with John Mullan; followed by a Q&A session

- 16.15 – 17.30 CET: Mark Ravenhill, reading/ talk and discussion with John Mullan; followed by a Q&A session

- 17.30 – 18.00 CET: closing speeches by John Whitehead (Director British Council Germany), Cortina Butler (Director Literature British Council); John Mullan (chairman of the seminar)

 

 
Terry Hawkes

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.053  Wednesday, 29 January 2014

 

From:        John Drakakis < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 28, 2014 at 10:48:43 AM EST

Subject:    Terry Hawkes

 

Dear Hardy,

 

You might like to announce over the SHAKSPER network the sad death of Terry Hawkes. Here is a form of words:

 

Terence Hawkes was emeritus professor of English at the University of Cardiff, and for some 50 years he was a leading world expert on Shakespeare. Between 1959 and 2007 he produced a series of books and collections of essays on Shakespeare, and from 1977 he was the general editor (and contributor to) The Methuen/Routledge New Accents series, that was instrumental in changing the direction of English Studies in British universities. He was also the founding editor of the influential journal 'Textual Practice', and the general editor and contributor to the 'Accents on Shakespeare' series. He broadcast on BBC radio in Wales and was a formative influence on a radical theoretical turn in Shakespeare scholarship that has now come to be regarded as central. He was also an inspirational lecturer and many of his former students now occupy chairs in universities across the world. He was a proficient jazz drummer who had played with musicians such as Acker Bilk and Digby Fairweather, he was a keen football supporter, and he was also active in local politics. The legacy of his scholarly work continues to be felt across the world, and his witty, perceptive, and erudite contributions will be sorely missed on the SHAKSPER network.

 

Cheers

John Drakakis

 
 
Invitation to AKU-ISMC Public Lectures

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.049  Tuesday, 28 January 2014

 

From:        Matt Brewer < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 27, 2014 at 8:57:55 AM EST

Subject:    Invitation to AKU-ISMC Public Lectures

 

Dear All,

 

The AKU-ISMC’s Public Lecture programme will recommence on Thursday 30th January at 5.00pm with a talk by Edward Wilson-Lee, Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge, on ‘Shakespeare and the Zanj’ . On Thursday 6th February at 5.00pm, Mohammad Fadel, Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, will present on ‘The Representational Ideal and the Sunni Conception of Public Law’. Details of both of these events can be found below (including how to register to attend).

 

Please feel free to pass this email on to anyone you feel may also be interested in attending.

 

Kind regards,

Matt Brewer

 

Thursday, 30th January 2014. 5.00-6.30pm.

 

'Shakespeare and the Zanj'

The reception, translation, and performance of Shakespeare in East Africa from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day

By Dr Edward Wilson-Lee

 

Abstract: This lecture – which draws on a larger project charting the reception, translation, and performance of Shakespeare in East Africa from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day – will use the widespread idolization of Shakespeare (by British travellers, the Arab elite, native Africans, and Indian settlers) to examine cultural relations on the Swahili Coast (the Zanj) in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. From the use of Shakespeare in Anglo-Omani diplomacy on Zanzibar to the rich history of performance in Mombasa of translations by Aga Hashr Kashmiri (the ‘Indian Shakespeare’), this hidden history provides rich and instructive examples of how art connects and divides cultures.

 

Chair: Dr Philip Wood

 

Biography: Dr Edward Wilson-Lee teaches early modern literature, Shakespeare, and medieval literature Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge; his research looks broadly at literature and the history of the book in the early modern period, and he is currently working on the history of Shakespeare reading/performance/translation in East Africa, as well as on the ways in which collections were organized in the early ages of print.

 

Register

 

Thursday, 6th February 2014. 5.00-6.30pm.

 

‘The Representational Ideal and the Sunni Conception of Public Law’

By Professor Mohammad Fadel

 

Abstract: The Sunni response to the crisis of post-prophetic authority was the concept of the caliphate. In contrast to the Shi'a concept of divine election (nass), Sunni theologians maintained that succession to positions of public leadership of the community were a matter of the community's choice (ikhtiyar).  Yet, this was not an unbounded choice: through the rules set out in the theological and juridical discussions on the caliphate, Sunni scholars made clear that the community's choice was to be guided by certain rules, standards and procedures. Dogmatic works of theology, and even juridical works such as al-Ahkam al-Sultaniyya of al-Mawardi, however, were interested more in the notion of how a legitimate post-Prophetic order is established rather than the details of how, once it comes into existence, its ongoing legitimacy, or the legitimacy of its actions, is to be measured.   To find an answer to this question this paper argues that Sunni jurists adopted a theory of public life that assumed public officials obtained their authority exclusively as agents of the Muslim public. Accordingly, the representational ideal of agency provided the moral basis for determining the legitimacy -- or lack thereof -- of the actions of public officials from the perspective of Sunni jurists.  The existence of this ideal is documented not in an explicit discussion of the nature of public offices in the fashion of political philosophy, but as befits jurists, manifests itself interstitially in the operation of numerous rules and doctrines in various chapters (abwab), jurisdictional and substantive, of the jurists' positive law (fiqh).  This paper outlines the source of the representational ideal of public offices, beginning with Sunni juridical discussions of the contract of the caliphate, and its operation as the crucial enabling and limiting principle on the powers of public officials through various examples from positive law.  

 

Chair: Dr David Taylor

 

Biography: Mohammad H. Fadel is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, which he joined in January 2006. Professor Fadel wrote his PhD. dissertation on legal process in medieval Islamic law while at the University of Chicago. Professor Fadel was admitted to the Bar of New York in 2000 and practiced law with the firm of Sullivan & Cromwell LLP in New York, New York, where he worked on a wide variety of corporate finance transactions and securities-related regulatory investigations. Professor Fadel also served as a law clerk to the Honorable Paul V. Niemeyer of the United States Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit and the Honorable Anthony A. Alaimo of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Georgia. Professor Fadel has published numerous articles in Islamic legal history and Islam and liberalism.

 

Register

 

If you would like to unsubscribe from our mailing list please email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

Matt Brewer

Administrative Assistant

Institute for the Study of Muslim Civilisations
The Aga Khan University (International) in the United Kingdom
210 Euston Road
London NW1 2DA

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7380 3856
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7380 3830
URL: www.aku.edu

Incorporated in England as a company limited by guarantee no. 4448389

 
 
Professor Sankalapuram Nagarajan (1929 - 2014)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.037  Monday, 20 January 2014

 

From:        Jim Harner < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 16, 2014 at 11:51:30 AM EST

Subject:    Professor S. Nagarajan, India

 

Professor Sankalapuram Nagarajan (1929 - 2014)

 

Professor Sankalapuram Nagarajan, one of India’s finest academicians, passed away in New Delhi around noon on January 6th, 2014. He leaves behind his wife, Srimathi, sons Shankar and Chandramouli, daughter Leela, and their families. Nagarajan—‘Nag’ to his close friends—was regarded as one of the most eminent Shakespeare scholars of India and an original voice in the world Shakespeare community of scholars.

 

Born in 1929 in Bangalore, he did his B.A (English Honours) at the University of Mysore and his M.A. in English Language and Literature at the University of Nagpur where he was awarded the University Gold Medal. After teaching at colleges in Amravati, Bangalore and Jabalpur, he went on to study for his Ph.D. in English at Harvard University. He earned the doctoral degree in a record time of two years (1959-61), and held the distinction of being India’s first Harvard Ph.D. in English. For his doctoral study he was awarded a Smith-Mundt/Fulbright fellowship, a Harvard University fellowship, and a Folger fellowship. 

 

At Harvard he worked with eminent Shakespeare scholars such as Professors Alfred Harbage and Herschel Baker. He finished his coursework with distinction under scholars like Walter Jackson Bate, Reuben Brower, David Perkins, and I.A. Richards. His dissertation on Shakespeare’s Problem Comedies resulted in an invitation to edit Measure for Measure for the Signet Classic Shakespeare. This edition has been in print continuously for over 45 years in spite of severe competition from later and more generously edited editions. In 2013, he published an edition of King Lear, a study he started as a Folger Shakespeare Library Fellow in 1998. 

 

Dr. Nagarajan’s scholarly articles on a wide-range of subjects, including comparative studies (the influence of Advaita Vedanta on Isherwood, for example) appeared in prestigious international journals like the Shakespeare Quarterly, Comparative Literature, Modern Fiction Studies, Ariel, and the Oxford Essays in Criticism. He was the Indian Correspondent of the World Shakespeare Bibliography for about three decades. As many of his former students and colleagues have remarked, Nagarajan was a keen supporter of literature in Indian languages. Thinking about literature in more than one language, he insisted, was a singular strength that Indian scholars could bring to the world stage.

 

Professor Nagarajan is also remembered for his outstanding contribution to higher education in India. After he returned to India from Harvard in 1961, he was appointed Chair of the University Department of English and Chairperson of the Board of Studies in English at the University of Poona (now Pune). He taught there till 1977 when he moved to the University of Hyderabad to assume the position of Professor of English, a position he held until he retired in April 1989. At the University of Hyderabad, he was Dean of the School of Humanities for six years and officiated for some time as Vice-Chancellor of the university. 

 

After his retirement, he served as an Emeritus Fellow of India’s prominent University Grants Commission (UGC). Later, the University of Hyderabad requested him to serve as the inaugural Director of its new Centre for the Study of Comparative Literature. During his tenure as professor at the University of Pune and at Hyderabad, the UGC honored him as National Lecturer in English and as a National Fellow. In addition, he held many fellowships and honorary lectureships, including being a British Council Visitor, an American Studies Fellow at Harvard, a visiting fellow at Clare Hall (Cambridge, U.K.), a Leverhulme Fellow at the Australian National University and a Commonwealth Universities Fellow at the University of Edinburgh. In 1988, he was elected Life Member at Clare Hall at the University of Cambridge. He was also invited to serve as Visiting Professor and advisor for the University of Mauritius during 1993 -1994.

 

Professor Nagarajan will be remembered for his many scholarly accomplishments and his role in advancing higher education in India. But above everything, it was Professor Nagarajan’s students who always brought an unstoppable sparkle and tenderness to his eyes. Their success and achievements evoked in him a parental pride. He gave his everything to students. Every student came away inspired and all felt deep love and respect for him. Students and colleagues were to remain his ever-growing family until he retired and beyond. One of most memorable occasions for Professor Nagarajan was the grand felicitation his former students from across the years hosted for his 75th birthday in Pune (or Poona, as he never stopped calling it by its older name). On hearing the news about Dr. Nagarajan, one of his former students (who now teaches in Belfast, Ireland) wrote, “[Dr. Nagarajan] conveyed to us brilliantly the disturbing power of poetry to teach us what we often did not know of ourselves. It is something we will never forget.”

 

Professor Nagarajan wrote late into his life. Commenting on his masterful edition of King Lear which was published recently in 2013, Professor Sylvan Barnet, the eminent Shakespeare scholar said, quoting from As You Like it: "O wonderful, wonderful, most wonderful wonderful, and yet again wonderful, and after that, out of all whooping!" Professor Barnet went on to describe the book: “[Nagarajan’s] King Lear is not only for Indian students--it is for all students--yes, and for all readers, including professors--who want a thorough yet judicious, readable commentary on the play.” 

 
 
Reg Foakes

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.036  Thursday, 16 January 2014

 

From:        John Cox < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 15, 2014 at 12:33:26 PM EST

Subject:    Reg Foakes

 

Following up on my earlier notice of Reg Foakes’s death, I have learned from Emily Hockley, Editorial Assistant for the Arden Shakespeare, that Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon will hold a memorial service for Reg next Monday, Jan. 20th, at 12:30 p.m. 

 

Emily also draws attention to tributes to Reg Foakes published online: http://bloggingshakespeare.com/honouring-reg-foakes

 

John Cox

Hope College

 
Celebrate 450 Years of William Shakespeare!

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.032  Wednesday, 15 January 2014

 

From:        Michael Luskin < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 14, 2014 at 4:39:25 PM EST

Subject:    Celebrate 450 Years of William Shakespeare!

 

From: Free Library of Philadelphia < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

 

[http://www.freelibrary.org]

 

*Celebrate William Shakespeare During the Year of the Bard! *

 

The Free Library of Philadelphia, in partnership with The Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre [http://www.phillyshakespeare.org/] and numerous other cultural organizations from around the region, is excited to present the Year of the Bard: Shakespeare at 450 [http://libwww.freelibrary.org/shakespeare/ ]—a year packed full of engaging, enlightening, and entertaining programs and events designed to celebrate Shakespeare in all his classic and modern incarnations.

 

Throughout 2014, the Year of the Bard [http://libwww.freelibrary.org/shakespeare/ ] will offer Shakespeare

buffs and newcomers alike a plethora of fun, festive ways to get in on the celebration. Every month throughout the year will feature numerous activities, including engaging lectures, digital and live exhibitions, pop-up and theatrical performances, and of course a big birthday bash on April 23.

 

Stay tuned to freelibrary.org/bard [http://libwww.freelibrary.org/bard ] for all the latest details and upcoming events!

 

Did you know?

 

“Shakespeare For All Time”, a new exhibition celebrating Shakespeare and featuring his important First Folio, will open on January 27 in the new William B. Dietrich Gallery in the Rare Book Department of the Parkway Central Library. The new gallery space was made possible with generous support from the William B. Dietrich Foundation.

 

The Free Library is one of the most important educational and cultural institutions in Philadelphia. The City of Philadelphia provides funds for the operations of the Free Library system, including staffing at our 54 locations. Through the generosity of individual gifts, the Free Library Foundation supports many of the Library’s incredible programs, which promote literacy and enrich the cultural fabric of our city.

 
 
Tom Pendleton

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.019  Saturday, 11 January 2014

 

From:        John Mahon < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 10, 2014 at 8:54:15 PM EST

Subject:    Tom Pendleton

 

Thomas A. Pendleton, Professor Emeritus of English at Iona College and Co-Editor of The Shakespeare Newsletter, died unexpectedly at his home in Norwalk, Connecticut, on Tuesday, December 31, 2013. He was 81 years old. Born in Brooklyn, New York, on March 30, 1932, to the late Charles F. and Marcella Pendleton, he served in the United States Army in the 1950s. He earned a B.A. in English from St. Michael’s College of the University of Toronto and an M.A. and Ph.D. in English from Fordham University. He taught English at Iona, in New Rochelle, New York, from 1959 until his retirement in 2012, and also served as chairman of the department and as a member of many college-wide committees. From 1991 until his death, he was co-editor of The Shakespeare Newsletter. He was a longtime Associate Member of the Columbia Shakespeare Seminar, known for his perceptive and probing contributions to discussions at seminar meetings. Although his primary scholarly interest was Shakespeare, he also taught and wrote about W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, and many modern American writers. He had interests in many other areas, including film, comic books, and baseball—and he had a gift for drawing as well. In addition to many essays, articles, and book and film reviews, he wrote I’m Sorry About the Clock: Chronology, Composition, and Narrative Technique in The Great Gatsby (1993), and he co-edited, and contributed to, “Fanned and Winnowed Opinions”: Shakespearean Essays Presented to Harold Jenkins (1997). He also edited, and contributed to, Henry VI: New Critical Essays (2001), and he edited Richard the Second for the New Kittredge Shakespeare (2012). He is survived by his wife Carol, whom he married on March 30, 1964.

 

 
Application Deadline Approaching for "Shakespeare and the Problem of Biography" Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.016  Thursday, 9 January 2014

 

From:        Elyse Martin < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 8, 2014 at 2:57:16 PM EST

Subject:    Deadline “Shakespeare and the Problem of Biography” Conference

 

Dear all,

 

The 13 January 2014 deadline for the Folger/NEH conference, “Shakespeare and the Problem of Biography,” is coming up!

 

As a reminder, funding is available through Folger Institute consortium. A generous NEH Collaborative Research grant also extends funding eligibility to qualified graduate students and faculty from U.S. institutions. For those who do not wish to apply for funding, a registration form is available here.

 

I would be happy to answer any questions you or your colleagues may have.

 

Sincerely,

Elyse Martin

Program Assistant

Folger Institute

(202) 675-0333

 

Shakespeare and the Problem of Biography

An NEH Collaborative Research Conference

Spring 2014

 

Schedule

 

There is no more iconic figure with whom to push forward a fresh critical evaluation of the aims and methods of literary biography than Shakespeare. Within the academy, textual analysis often denies biography any explanatory force, while popular conceptions of Shakespeare look to biography precisely for insight into the works. In the standoff, the genre of literary biography is lost as a subject of serious inquiry. On the 450th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s birth, the Folger Institute Center for Shakespeare Studies will undertake a rigorous investigation of the multiple—and conflicted—roles biography plays in the reception of Shakespeare today. A cadre of influential scholars, many of whom have written biographies of Shakespeare, will focus discussion on such topics as the distinctions between authorship and agency, the interpretations of documentary evidence, the impact of methods of dating texts on an understanding of Shakespeare’s life, the broadened context for that life of a more robust understanding of theatrical activity, and the possibility that biography is itself a form of historical fiction. The conference opens Thursday evening with a session that doubles as Shakespeare’s Birthday Lecture. In his presentation on “Shakespeare, Biography & Anti-Biography,” Brian Cummings will discuss the problem of writing the life of Shakespeare in terms of the documentary history and its haunting sense of missing links.

 

Organizers: Brian Cummings (Anniversary Professor of English, University of York), Kathleen Lynch (Executive Director, Folger Institute), and David Schalkwyk (Academic Director of the Global Shakespeare Project, Queen Mary University of London/Warwick University).

 

Speakers: Tarnya Cooper (National Portrait Gallery), Ian Donaldson (University of Melbourne), John Drakakis (University of Stirling), Katherine Duncan-Jones (Somerville College, Oxford), Lawrence Goldman (St. Peter’s College, Oxford), Stephen Greenblatt (Harvard University), Margreta de Grazia (University of Pennsylvania), Graham Holderness (University of Hertfordshire), Julia Reinhard Lupton (University of California, Irvine), Jack Lynch (Rutgers University), Lena Cowen Orlin (Georgetown University), Lois Potter (University of Delaware), Joseph Roach (Yale University), and William H. Sherman (Victoria and Albert Museum, University of York)

 

Schedule: Thursday evening through Saturday afternoon, 3 – 5 April 2014.

 

Apply: 13 January 2014 for grants-in-aid to support travel and lodging. A generous NEH Collaborative Research grant extends funding eligibility to qualified graduate students and faculty from U.S. institutions. Application form is available here.

 

Registration: For those not planning to request travel and lodging funding, a registration form is available here.

 

Please direct any further questions to  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 
 
NEH Summer Seminar at Amherst College

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.015  Thursday, 9 January 2014

 

From:        Megan Estes < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         December 19, 2013 at 2:43:32 PM EST

Subject:    NEH Summer Seminar at Amherst College

 

SUMMER SEMINAR ON PUNISHMENT, POLITICS, AND CULTURE

 

Amherst College will host a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for K-12 teachers and current full time graduate students who intend to pursue a career in K-12 teaching, from June 30-July 31, 2014. The seminar will be directed by Austin Sarat of the Departments of Political Science and Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought. It will examine three questionsWhat is punishment and why do we punish as we do?   What can we learn about politics, law, and culture in the United States from an examination of our practices of punishment?  What are the appropriate limits of punishment?  The application deadline is March 4, 2014.  Information is available at http://www.amherst.edu/go/neh. If you have any questions regarding the seminar or the application process, contact Megan Estes at (413)542-2380 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

*Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.*

 

Megan L. Estes Ryan

Academic Department Coordinator

Amherst College Law, Jurisprudence & Social Thought

PO Box 5000, Clark House

Amherst, MA   01002

(413) 542-2380

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
Beyond Authorship Symposium

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.013  Wednesday, 8 January 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Subject:    Beyond Authorship Symposium

 

This symposium announcement is from Brett Hirsch.

 

http://notwithoutmustard.net/beyond-authorship/

 

 

Dear all,

 

Apologies for cross-posting, but this symposium may be of interest to a number of you, your loved ones, pets, and enemies.

 

BEYOND AUTHORSHIP

24-27 June 2014

University of Newcastle Australia

 

This symposium seeks to move beyond authorship as the primary focus of corpus-based studies in early modern literature, to consider broader questions of language and style, genre and form, influence and adaptation; to interrogate the new literary histories enabled by electronic text corpora, and the new methods of analysis they make possible. 

 

Confirmed speakers include Douglas Bruster, Gabriel Egan, Jonathan Hope, MacDonald P. Jackson, Lynne Magnusson, and Michael Witmore. 

 

The convenors, Hugh Craig and Brett D. Hirsch, invite proposals for long and short papers (20/40 min) and quick-fire poster presentations (5 min). For consideration, abstracts should be received by email to both convenors before 1 February 2014.

 

To download a poster/flyer and for more details, visit http://notwithoutmustard.net/beyond-authorship/

 
New Email Address for the British Shakespeare Association

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.012  Wednesday, 8 January 2014

 

From:        BSA < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 6, 2014 at 2:31:42 PM EST

Subject:    New Email Address for the British Shakespeare Association

 

E-mail displayed incorrectly? Read it in your browser

 

British Shakespeare Association

 

Dear Members,

We’ve recently discovered that our email address, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , has become corrupted and any emails sent to it in recent weeks will not have been received. This also applies to any messages sent through the ‘Contact the BSA’ form on our website, which uses the same email account.

The BSA’s new email is This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Please use this for all future correspondence. We always aim to respond quickly to any messages we get so if you have tried to get in touch with us in recent weeks and we have not replied, please try again with this new email address and we will respond as soon as possible. 

Please accept my apologies for any inconvenience that this has caused

 

Best wishes
Stuart Hampton-Reeves
Chair of the British Shakespeare Association

 
 
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