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New Section Launch for B&L: Call for Submissions

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0462  Monday, 30 September 2013

 

From:        Sujata Iyengar < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 27, 2013 4:58:21 PM EDT

Subject:     New Section Launch for B&L: Call for Submissions

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS to a new “Digital Appropriations” section of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation (or B&L)

 

B&L is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal publishing original scholarship on the afterlives of Shakespearean texts and their literary, filmic, multimedia, and critical histories. We publish two issues, online, per year: <http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/ >. In addition to articles and article clusters (groups of two or more related articles with a short introduction by the cluster editor), we regularly publish three dedicated sections: Appropriations in Performance, Notes, and Book Reviews.

 

We are pleased to announce a new fourth section, “Digital Appropriations,” edited by Dr. Michael Ullyot, Assistant Professor (English) at the University of Calgary: < http://ullyot.ucalgaryblogs.ca/ > or <http://zeugmatic.org/ >.

 

We seek thesis-driven reviews of the following:

 

[a] Digital editions and encoded texts, particularly those focused on research and teaching applications. That includes student editions/multimedia apps; TEI-compliant encoded texts for adaptation, visualization, &c.; and other text-based resources.

 

[b] Projects, databases, visualizations, and other resources that build on Shakespeare’s texts and performance archives. 

 

We also welcome proposals for reviews of digital objects that fall outside of these categories, including games or social-media appropriations.

 

Send queries, including proposals for reviews or review clusters, to the section editor: < ullyot[at]ucalgary.ca >. 

 

We prefer thesis-driven reviews that make arguments about digital objects, rather than primarily descriptive or evaluative reviews. Arguments can focus on Shakespeare within the reviewed application or tool, or upon the digital affordances of these Shakespeare objects for teaching or research. 

 

Reviews are normally between 1000 and 3000 words. We encourage authors to embed links and media, as appropriate, to take advantage of B&L’s medium, and to consult Richard Lanham’s Revising Prose or Joseph Williams’s Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace as they edit their work. Upon acceptance, we will ask authors to verify all citations and to put their essays into the journal’s house style.

 

B&L is co-edited by co-founders Dr. Christy Desmet < cdesmet[at]uga.edu >and Dr. Sujata Iyengar < iyengar[at]uga.edu >; please address editorial correspondence to lenders[at]uga.edu or to Managing Editor Ms. Maria Chappell < machapp[at]uga.edu >.

 
 
Special Issue of Shakespeare on Global Shakespeares

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0458  Friday, 27 September 2013

 

From:        Alexander Huang < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 26, 2013 2:43:50 PM EDT

Subject:     Special Issue of Shakespeare on Global Shakespeares

 

Shakespeare (The British Shakespeare Association) Volume 9, Issue 3, September 2013

 

Special Issue on Global Shakespeares, edited by Alexander Huang

Available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rshk20/current#.UkR-NSR57rg

 

Video clips that accompany the articles are available on: http://globalshakespeares.mit.edu/

 

ARTICLES

 

Global Shakespeares as Methodology

Alexander C. Y. Huang
pages 273-290

 

Having reached a critical mass of participants, performances and the study of Shakespeare in different cultural contexts are changing how we think about globalization. The idea of global Shakespeares has caught on because of site-specific imaginations involving early modern and modern Globe theatres that aspired to perform the globe. Seeing global Shakespeares as a methodology rather than as appendages of colonialism, as political rhetorics, or as centerpieces in a display of exotic cultures situates us in a postnational space that is defined by fluid cultural locations rather than by nation-states. This framework helps us confront archival silences in the record of globalization, understand the spectral quality of citations of Shakespeare and mobile artworks, and reframe the debate about cultural exchange. Global Shakespeares as a field registers the shifting locus of anxiety between cultural particularity and universality. The special issue explores the promise and perils of political articulations of cultural difference and suggests new approaches to performances in marginalized or polyglot spaces.

 

 

Hamlet, the Heike and the Fall of Troy

Peter S. Donaldson
pages 291-303

 

Postcolonial hybridity: The making of a Bollywood Lear in London

Kinga Földváry
pages 304-312

 

Caribbean tricksters at crossroads: Davlin Thomas’s Lear Ananci and Hamlet: The Eshu Experience

Giselle Rampaul
pages 313-321

 

European touring stars and the Shakespearean distinction of the Spanish actor-manager in Madrid and Latin America (1898–1936)

Juan F. Cerdá
pages 322-329

 

What's global about global Shakespeare? The case of Perttu Leppä's 8 päivää ensi-iltaan (8 Days to the Premiere)

Nely Keinänen
pages 330-338

 

 

REVIEWS

 

Review of Sua Incelença, Ricardo III (directed by Gabriel Villela for Clowns de Shakespeare) at Largo da Ordem, Curitiba, Brazil, 29 March 2011

Anna S. Camati & Liana C. Leão
pages 339-341

 

Review of Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus (directed by Silviu Purcarete), the National Theater in Craiova, Romania, 14 March 1992

Lucian Ghita
pages 342-346

 

Review of Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale (Directed by Anirudh Nair and Neel Chaudhuri for The Tadpole Repertory and Wide Aisle Productions), Zorba the Buddha Performance Space, Ghitorni, New Delhi, India, 3 March 2013

Jyotsna Singh
pages 347-349

 

Review of The Speaker’s Progress (directed by Sulayman Al-Bassam), Paramount Theatre, Boston, USA, October 12-16, 2011

Margaret Litvin
pages 350-352

 

Review of La Tempestad (directed by John Mowat for the Companhia do Chapitô) at the Corral de Comedias, Almagro, Spain, 23 July 2011

Carla Della Gatta
pages 353-355

 

Review of Hamlet or Three Boys and One Girl (adapted and directed by Nikolay Georgiev and the @lma @lter Student Theatre-Laboratory) at the Theatre Hall of Sofia University, Bulgaria, 12 March 2013

Georgi Niagolov
pages 356-358

 

Review of Shakespeare and APA’s Macbeth: Leila and Ben – A Bloody History (directed by Lotfi Achour) and the company's talkback at Re-making Shakespeare for the World Shakespeare Festival at the Northern Stage, Newcastle, UK, 14 July 2012

Saffron J. Walkling & Raphael Cormack
pages 359-361

 

Review of Robert Lewis’ Red Hamlet (directed by Robert Lewis) for the Group Theatre, New York, October 1933

Jeffrey Butcher
pages 362-364

 

Review of Shakespeare’s Othello (directed by Nikos Charalambous for the Cyprus Theatre Organization) at Latsia Municipal Theatre, Nicosia, Cyprus, 27 November 2010

Eleni Pilla
pages 365-366

 

 

REVIEW ARTICLE

 

Giving a “Local Habitation” to “Airy Nothing”: Review of the Global Shakespeares Video and Performance Archive

Haylie Brooke Swenson
pages 367-372

 
 
Shakespearean London Theatres (ShaLT) Films

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0456  Tuesday, 24 September 2013

 

From:        Gabriel Egan < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 23, 2013 3:03:10 PM EDT

Subject:     Shakespearean London Theatres (ShaLT) Films

 

The Shakespearean London Theatres (ShaLT) project just released its final batch of films:

 

“Endgame”

 

(1) A performed excerpt from Thomas Middleton and William Rowley’s play A Fair Quarrel Act I Scene 1, first performed c. 1615-1617 (7 minutes)

http://youtu.be/oXzOXr4yc_o

 

(2) An examination of the career of Christopher Beeston and the last years of Caroline theatre (11 minutes)

http://youtu.be/rfUBqHDYsAI

 

(3) A research interview with theatre historian Michael Dobson on Christopher Beeston and Caroline drama (15 minutes)

http://youtu.be/gTZPR5Ce-eQ

 

In total the ShaLT Films page at http://shalt.org.uk/films now has five-and-a-half hours of video footage comprising short documentaries, performed scenes from plays, and research interviews, all of which may be freely reused in anyone’s teaching or research.

 

The project’s investigators, myself and Andrew Gurr, would like especially to thank the theatre historians who contributed to the project by agreeing to be interviewed and/or giving a public talk at the Victoria & Albert Museum this summer. They are:

 

  Martin Butler

  Ralph Alan Cohen

  Michael Dobson

  Jean E. Howard

  Grace Ioppolo

  Farah Karim-Cooper

  Andy Kesson

  Lucy Munro

  Julie Sanders

  Tiffany Stern

  Gary Taylor

  Joanne Tompkins

  Martin White

  Peter Womack

 

At a time when academics are under increasing pressure to concentrate on activities that have a measurable economic impact it was a privilege to receive the free contributions of these leaders of our subject discipline. It was also an education in itself. Any omissions, errors, or offence inadvertently given are my responsibility.

 

Gabriel Egan

Principal Investigator, ShaLT

 
 
Recent Additions to Lexicons of Early Modern English

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0455  Tuesday, 24 September 2013

 

From:        UTP Journals < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 23, 2013 2:07:56 PM EDT

Subject:     Recent Additions to Lexicons of Early Modern English

 

Recently added to Lexicons of Early Modern English - http://leme.library.utoronto.ca/

  • Robert Cawdrey, A Table Alphabetical, Containing and Teaching the Understanding of Hard Usual English Words (1617)
  • Jean de La Quintinie, The Complete Gardener (1693)
  • Anonymous, The Great Herbal (1526)
  • Claude Hollyband, A Dictionarie French and English (1593)
  • Richard Benese, The Manner of Measuring (1537)
  • Edward Hatton, The Merchant's Magazine Dictionary of Merchandise and Trade (1699)

 

Coming soon to LEME

  • John Thorie, The Theatre of the Earth (1601)
  • Richard Head, The English Rogue (1665)
  • John Rider, Bibliotheca Scholastica(1589)
  • Latin-English dictionary
  • Guy Miege, A New Dictionary, French and English (1677)
  • Sir Thomas Blount,  Nomo-Lexikon(1670)
  • Henry Hexham,  A Copious English and Netherdutch Dictionary(1641-42)
  • Joshua Poole, English Parnassus(1657)  

 

Lexicons of Early Modern English is a growing historical database offering scholars unprecedented access to early books and manuscripts documenting the growth and development of the English language. With more than 600,000 word-entries from 184 monolingual, bilingual, and polyglot dictionaries, glossaries, and linguistic treatises, encyclopedic and other lexical works from the beginning of printing in England to 1702, as well as tools updated annually, LEME sets the standard for modern linguistic research on the English language. 

 

Use Modern Techniques to Research Early Modern English!

184 searchable lexicons

139 fully analyzed lexicons

618,477 total word entries

398,128 fully analyzed word entries

60,891 total English modern headwords

 

LEME provides exciting opportunities for research for historians of the English language. More than a half-million word-entries devised by contemporary speakers of early modern English describe the meaning of words, and their equivalents in languages such as French, Italian, Spanish, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and other tongues encountered then in Europe, America, and Asia.

 

University of Toronto Press Journals

5201 Dufferin St., Toronto, ON, Canada M3H 5T8

Tel: (416) 667-7810 Fax: (416) 667-7881

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

www.utpjournals.com/leme

http://leme.library.utoronto.ca/

 

[Editor’s Note: I have been a long-time subscriber to LEME. I find it an invaluable tool for annotating works of the period. –Hardy Cook]

 
 
Symposium: Essex: The Cultural Impact of an Elizabethan Courtier

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0454  Tuesday, 24 September 2013

 

From:        Annaliese Connolly < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 23, 2013 9:39:50 AM EDT

Subject:     Symposium: Essex: The Cultural Impact of an Elizabethan Courtier

 

Essex

The cultural impact of an Elizabethan courtier

 

 

One-Day Symposium

Saturday 26th October, 12-4.30pm

Sheffield Hallam University, Room 9003, Cantor Building, City Campus

Please contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it to register

 

This one-day symposium marks the publication of a new collection of essays about the life and cultural impact of Robert Devereux, second earl of Essex.  It brings together scholars who have been involved with the collection and whose research continues to engage with some of the issues and questions raised by their work for the volume.  The papers will consider a selection of the diverse visual and textual manifestations of Essex and his circle in poetry and portraiture as well as in texts produced by the earl himself.

 

There is no registration fee and refreshments will be provided, but we do require you to e-mail us in advance to book a place: 

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Welcome and Opening Remarks 

Lisa Hopkins (Sheffield Hallam University)

 

‘“Mine excuse must only be the worthiness of former precedents”: Gervase Markham’s English Arcadia and the Earl of Essex’s Sidneian Inheritance’. 

Richard Wood (Sheffield Hallam University)

 

‘More Poetry by the Earl of Essex?’ 

Hugh Gazzard (St. Hugh’s College, Oxford)

 

‘From Imitation to Counterfeit: Essex’s hand in correspondence’. 

Andrew Gordon (University of Aberdeen).

 

“‘Still renewing wronges”: Gheeraert’s Persian Lady Revealed’. 

Chris Laoutaris (Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham) and Yasmin Arshad (University College London)

 

Annaliese Connolly

Lecturer in English 

Sheffield Hallam University

 

Flyer: icon Essex Flier

 
 
CFP: Society for Textual Scholarship 2014 Conference

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0453  Monday, 23 September 2013

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Monday, September 23, 2013

Subject:     CFP: Society for Textual Scholarship 2014 Conference

 

The Society for Textual Scholarship has issued the CFP for its 2014 conference in Seattle, “Textual Scholarship Across the Disciplines”. Visit http://www.textual.org/ and click on “Call for Papers” for more information.

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

The Society for Textual Scholarship

International Interdisciplinary Conference

March 20-22, 2014

University of Washington, Seattle

 

“Textual Scholarship Across the Disciplines”

 

Program Chairs: Jeffrey Todd Knight and Geoffrey Turnovsky, University of Washington

 

Deadline for Proposals: November 1, 2013

 

=======================================================

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

 

Johanna Drucker, UCLA

David Scott Kastan, Yale U

Sheldon Pollock, Columbia U

 

=======================================================

 

This conference will bring the Society for Textual Scholarship to UW-Seattle, home of the Textual Studies Program, the first of its kind in the U.S. when it was founded in 1997. Situated between the Olympic and Cascade Mountains on the Puget Sound, Seattle is among the most scenic, vibrant, and bookish cities in America. Conference participants will have an opportunity to explore the rich culture of the city, including the Rem Koolhaas-designed Seattle Central Library, the Richard Hugo House, UW Special Collections, and a thriving book arts and craft printing community.

 

We invite proposals on any aspect of textual scholarship, including the discovery, enumeration, description, bibliographical analysis, editing, annotation, and mark-up of texts from a broad spectrum of disciplines, including literature, history, musicology, classical and biblical studies, philosophy, art history, legal history, the history of science and technology, computer science, library and information science, lexicography, epigraphy, paleography, codicology, cinema studies, new media studies, game studies, theater and performance studies, linguistics, gender and sexuality studies, race and ethnicity studies, indigenous studies, and textual and literary theory.

 

In honor of the STS’s first trip to the west coast, we especially encourage submissions that traverse disciplinary territory and/or geographic space. Our choice of keynote speakers reflects three key areas of disciplinary and cultural overlap – the digital humanities, histories of the book, and globally comparative philologies – where textual scholarship is closely implicated in current academic and popular debates.

 

Submissions may take the following forms:

 

1. Papers. Papers (or papers with slideshow presentations) should be no more than 20 minutes in length, making a significant original contribution to scholarship. Papers that are primarily reports or demonstrations of tools or projects are discouraged.

 

2. Panels. Panels may consist of either three associated papers or four to six roundtable speakers. Roundtables should address topics of broad interest and scope, with the goal of fostering lively debate with audience participation.

 

3. Seminars. Seminars should propose a specific topic, issue, or text for intensive collective exploration. Accepted seminar proposals will be announced on the conference Web site (http://www.textual.org) at least two months prior to the conference and attendees will then be required to enroll themselves with the posted seminar leader(s). The seminar leader(s) will circulate readings and other preparatory materials in advance of the conference. No papers shall be read at the seminar session. Instead participants will engage with the circulated material in a discussion under the guidance of the seminar leader(s). All who enroll are expected to contribute to creating a mutually enriching experience.

 

4. Workshops. Workshops should propose a specific problem, tool, or skill set for which the workshop leader will provide expert guidance and instruction. Examples might be an introduction to forensic computing or paleography. Workshop proposals that are accepted will be announced on the conference Web site (http://www.textual.org) and attendees will be required to enroll with the workshop leader(s).

 

Proposals for all formats should include a title; abstract (250 words max.) of the proposed paper, panel, seminar, or workshop; and name, email address, and institutional affiliation for all participants. Format should be clearly indicated. Seminar and workshop proposals in particular should take care to articulate the imagined audience and any expectations of prior knowledge or preparation.

 

***All abstracts should indicate what if any technological support will be required.***

 

Inquiries and proposals should be submitted electronically to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

For additional contact information:

 

http://faculty.washington.edu/jtknight/web/

 

http://frenchitalian.washington.edu/people/geoffrey-turnovsky

 

All participants in the STS 2014 conference must be members of STS. For information about membership, please visit the society for Textual Scholarship website http://textualsociety.org/membership-information/. For conference updates and information, see the STS website at http://textualsociety.org.

 
 
Shakespearean London Theatres (ShaLT)

 


The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0450  Monday, 16 September 2013

 

From:        Gabriel Egan < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 16, 2013 1:05:46 PM EDT

Subject:     Shakespearean London Theatres (ShaLT)

 

[Editor’s Note: Below are three separate announcements about the ShaLT project. I did not receive the first two of these sent after the last ShaLT message I received from Dr. Egan and distributed on September 3rd. Only today did I determine that I have not been getting submissions from Gabriel Egan. Since we have been doing server maintenance during this period, something may very well be not working properly on my side. Do check and if you have sent me something that you have not seen posted in Newsletters since August 29, 2013, please resend that message to  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it {For long-time SHAKSPER subscribers and others,  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  has not been used since the major SHAKSPER upgrade so PLEASE DO NOT send submissions to that address.} If you have sent something and have not seen it, also please send me a note at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  to alert me. I will try to find out what has been going on and whether the problem is just with Dr. Egan’s or more subscribers. –Hardy M. Cook, Editor] 

 

 

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 11:36 AM (Date Received)

 

The project Shakespearean London Theatres (ShaLT) has released its second batch of films, this time on the topic of "Outdoor Playing":

 

(1) A performed excerpt from Shakespeare’s play Richard III Act I Scene 2, first performed c.1592 (8 minutes)

http://youtu.be/m-2L5in5Q68

 

(2) An examination of the role of James Burbage in early theatre (10 minutes)

http://youtu.be/_NtgDJxn6aA

 

(3) A research interview with theatre historian Gabriel Egan on the subject of outdoor playing (30 minutes)

http://youtu.be/-vXnSCjgQoo

 

(4) A research interview with theatre historian Tiffany Stern on the subject of outdoor playing (24 minutes)

http://youtu.be/92iHcnxQGOk

 

(5) A research interview with theatre historian Andrew Gurr on the subject of outdoor playing (44 minutes)

http://youtu.be/RXaFBFmQLLc

 

All are offered under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike licence (CC-BY-SA). The same licence covers all the material on the project website at http://shalt.org.uk.

 

Gabriel Egan

Principal Investigator, ShaLT

 

 

Wednesday, September 11, 2013 11:33 AM (Date Received)

 

The project Shakespearean London Theatres (ShaLT) has released its third batch of films. The title of this group is “Co-Rivals” and among other things it considers the balance between mutual cooperation and competitive rivalry in the relationships between early modern theatre companies.

 

“Co-Rivals”

 

(1) A performed excerpt from Kyd’s play The Spanish Tragedy Act II Scene 4, first performed in the late 1580s or early 1590s (6 minutes)

http://youtu.be/-PdwrQdcs1Y

 

(2) An examination of the roles of Philip Henslowe and Edward Alleyn in early theatre (10 minutes)

http://youtu.be/qpPA28nGA3w

 

(3) A research interview with theatre historian Grace Ioppolo on the subject of Henslowe and Alleyn (26 minutes)

http://youtu.be/PTmdaKc1kus

 

All are offered under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike licence (CC-BY-SA). The same licence covers all the material on the project website at http://shalt.org.uk.

 

Gabriel Egan

Principal Investigator, ShaLT

 

 

September 16, 2013 7:55:24 AM EDT (Date Received)

 

The project Shakespearean London Theatres (ShaLT) is pleased to announce the release of its fourth batch of films. This one is on “Indoor Playing” and includes a freshly recorded excerpt from the play Eastward Ho!. As before, the films are available on YouTube for streaming and will appear shortly on the ShaLT website at http://shalt.org.uk for direct downloading and reuse. They’re offered under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike licence (CC-BY-SA) which puts very few limits on what you can do with them. The project would like to hear feedback (via the website) from anyone using these films, or any other of our free materials including the smartphone app, walking map, Guide, and our images.

 

“Indoor Playing”

 

(1) A performed excerpt from George Chapman, Ben Jonson and John Marston's play Eastward Ho! Act I Scene 4, first performed in 1605 (8 minutes)

http://youtu.be/fNPul8OGQwE

 

(2) An examination of indoor playing, and in particular Jonson and the city comedies (10 minutes)

http://youtu.be/CWlvXUllgW0

 

(3) A research interview with theatre historian Julie Sanders on indoor plays and their audiences (21 minutes)

http://youtu.be/4ufnRuqtV9A

 

(4) A research interview with theatre historian Martin White on indoor playing, staging and repertories (22 minutes)

ahttp://youtu.be/rs5N4uNDFIA

 

Gabriel Egan

Principal Investigator, ShaLT

 

[Editor’s Note 2: ShaLT is a fascinating project distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike licence (CC-BY-SA). Please leave feedback at the project web site. As those of us who deal with such matters know, this sort of feedback often plays a significant role with ongoing funding for them. Respond with feedback and help ShaLT! –Hardy]

 

[Editor’s Note 3: Also please let me know if you would like to see the SHAKSPER Book Reviews (SBReviews) continue. –Hardy]

 
 
British Shakespeare Association Fellowships Day

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0448  Monday, 16 September 2013

 

From:        BSA < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 16, 2013 10:54:52 AM EDT

Subject:     British Shakespeare Association Fellowships Day

 

British Shakespeare Association

 

BSA Fellowships Day Saturday 30 November

 

10.00am to 4.00 pm, 

The Shakespeare Centre, 

Henley Street, 

Stratford-upon-Avon.

 

The British Shakespeare Association are conferring upon Professors Terence Hawkes and Stanley Wells the title of Honorary Fellow in recognition of their significant contributions to Shakespeare scholarship. This special event will consist of reflections on their work by colleagues and peers. The day will cost £5.00 per person (no discounts, pay on the door only). Members of the BSA are invited to remain after the event for the BSA’s Annual General Meeting (from 4.00 pm). It would be helpful to have a sense of numbers in advance, so we are inviting people to sign up via e-mail. Please send your name and contact details (including a phone number) to  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it   Alternatively, you can just turn up on the day.

 
 
CFP: Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Graduate Conference 2014

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0447  Thursday, 12 September 2013

 

From:        Sofia Novello < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 12, 2013 5:45:47 AM EDT

Subject:     CfP SGC 2014

 

30 October is the deadline for submissions to participate to the British Institute of Florence’s Shakespeare Graduate Conference in April 2014. 

 

http://www.britishinstitute.it/en/event/442/call-for-papers-shakespeare-and-his-contemporaries-graduate-conference-2014-/

 

Call for Papers: Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Graduate Conference 2014

 

6th Annual Postgraduate Conference 10th April 2014

 

The British Institute of Florence’s annual Shakespeare Graduate Conference is a one-day interdisciplinary and bilingual English-Italian forum open to PhD students and researchers who have obtained their doctorates within the past 5 years. This year’s conference theme is Shakespeare and His Contemporaries: Forms of Nationhood. Contributions are welcomed on the topic of national identity and representations of Elizabethan England in the literary production of William Shakespeare and his contemporaries (playwrights, poets and others) across different disciplines (not limited to): literature, comparative studies, history, art history, cinema and theatre history.

 

Candidates are invited to send a description of their proposed contribution according to the following guidelines:

  • the candidate should provide name, institution, contact info, title and a short abstract of the proposed contribution (200-300 words for a 20-minute paper), explaining the content and intended structure of the paper, and including a short bibliography.
  • abstracts are to be submitted by Wednesday 30 October 2013 by email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
    all proposals will be blind-vetted. The list of selected papers will be available by the end of November 2013.
  • each finished contribution is to last no longer than 20 minutes and is to be presented in English (an exception will be made for Italian candidates of departments other than English, who can present papers in Italian).
  • Candidates whose first language is not English will need to have their proposals and final papers checked by a mother-tongue speaker.   
  • participants will be asked to present a final draft of the paper a week before the Conference.
  • participants must be members of the Harold Acton Library, choosing between a 3, 6 or 12 month membership.* Memberships can be paid for on the day of conference.
  • The British Institute cannot reimburse any travel or accommodation expenses.
  • papers submitted will be considered for publication in the online proceedings edition of the ‘Shakespeare and His Contemporaries’ Graduate Conference (see the website www.britishinstitute.it for previous volumes of the proceedings).

Deadline for abstracts Wednesday 30 October 2013. 

                          

For more information contact Sofia Novello at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

Sofia Novello

Library Assistant & Co-ordinator of the Shakespeare Graduate Conference

The British Institute of Florence

Palazzo Lanfredini

Lungarno Guicciardini 9

50125 Firenze

Italia

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
Shakespeare Guild Programs

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0446  Thursday, 12 September 2013

 

From:        John F Andrews < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 11, 2013 9:31:22 PM EDT

Subject:     Shakespeare Guild Programs

 

Speaking of Shakespeare with Zoe Caldwell

 

Monday, September 23

National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park, Manhattan

Reservations Requested

 

The Shakespeare Guild is delighted to open its 2013-14 season in New York with a stage legend. In Terrence McNally’s Master Class, a 1995 drama in which she offered “not so much an impersonation of Maria Calls as a re-creation of her aura: Imperious, fiery, remote, egomaniacal, bigger-than-life” (Chicago Tribune ), Zoe Caldwell earned her fourth Tony Award and inspired a New York Times profile (accompanied by an inimitable Al Hirschfeld portrayal) in which she and her husband, producer Robert Whitehead, were hailed as “Mr. and Mrs. Broadway.” Ms Caldwell has worked with such immortals as Judith Anderson, Tyrone Guthrie, Charles Laughton, and Paul Robeson. She has also directed some of the most esteemed actors in the profession, among them Glenda Jackson, James Earl Jones, and Christopher Plummer. She’s now at work on a sequel to I Will Be Cleopatra, a charming memoir about her childhood in Australia, and in a conversation that will include her son and manager, Charlie Whitehead, she’ll share some of the highlights of a career that has been both stellar and extraordinarily versatile. 

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A Warm Salute to Theatre for a New Audience

 

Thursday, November 21

National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park, Manhattan

Reservations Requested

 

Founded in 1979 by Jeffrey Horowitz, and chaired for most of its distinguished history by Theodore C. Rogers, Theatre for a New Audience has earned dozens of honors and provided a congenial setting for directors like Peter Brook, Peter Hall, and Bartlett Sher, and for actors such as Kathleen Chalfant, Mark Rylance, and John Douglas Thompson. It was the first American company to perform a Bardic classic in Stratford-upon-Avon’s Royal Shakespeare Theatre, and its rendering of The Merchant of Venice, with F. Murray Abraham as Shylock, was featured in the RSC’s recent Complete Works Festival. Two Julie Taymor films, Titus and The Tempest, evolved from productions at Theatre for a New Audience, and in November Ms. Taymor’s long-anticipated production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream will inaugurate its sparkling new Polonsky Shakespeare Center in Brooklyn. Please join us for a celebratory toast to Jeffrey Horowitz and Ted Rogers.   

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A Memorable Evening with Adam Gopnik

 

Friday, November 22

The Players, 16 Gramercy Park in Manhattan

Admission $25

 

Best known, perhaps, for Paris to the Moon, a touching account of the years that he and his family spent in the City of Light, Adam Gopnik has also enriched our lives with Americans in Paris, an anthology of New World responses to the French capital, and The Table Comes First: France, Family, and the Meaning of Food, a volume that has been lauded in the Dining section of the New York Times and is now being adapted for the theatre. Another of Mr. Gopnik’s publications, Angels and Ages: A Short Book about Darwin, Lincoln, and Modern Life, derives its title from a New Yorker article about conflicting accounts of Edwin M. Stanton’s famous eulogy as America’s 16th President expired from a wound that had been inflicted a few hours earlier in Ford’s Theatre. For this gathering, which will take place in the final home of actor Edwin Booth, the older brother of Lincoln’s assassin, Mr. Gopnik will join the Guild’s John Andrews in a conversation that will include reflections about the 50th anniversary of a more recent tragedy, with allusions to such classics as Julius Caesar, Hamlet, and Macbeth.

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For details about these and related offerings, visit www.shakesguild.org. To secure reservations, send a message to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call 505-988-9560.

 
 
The SBReviews: SHAKSPER Book Reviews

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0438  Thursday, 5 September 2013

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Thursday, September 5, 2013

Subject:     The SBReviews: SHAKSPER Book Reviews

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

I have regained much of the energy I had ten years ago through my practice and through the work of excellent doctors and surgeons. At the end of next week, I will have another surgery. As much as I would like to view myself as someone who can do everything, recovery, physical therapy, and my commitment to deepening my practice all take up a sizable amount of my time, even though I am “retired.”

 

A while ago, I acknowledged that I could not do all things and asked for a collaborator to help me redo my “Selected Guide to Shakespeare on the Internet.” Jed Serrano volunteered for that task and is working assiduously on it. At some point, I will ask for a volunteer or volunteers to review Jed’s work and offer any suggestions to the two of us prior to mounting the new Guide.

 

Now, I have some other questions. 

 

I got the idea a number of years ago to institute The SBReviews: SHAKSPER Book Reviews: http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/book-reviews

 

I had a dedicated group of volunteers to whom I offer my wholehearted thanks: http://shaksper.net/about/book-review-panel.

 

However, I have allowed The SBReviews to become moribund. 

 

There is an inherent problem with having active scholars, especially with their various academic responsibilities, working in volunteer capacities on a peer-reviewed project like The SBReviews or the Roundtable. 

 

So I thought I would ask the membership two questions for your private reactions:

  1. Did you find The SBReviews a valuable part of your SHAKSPER subscription and of the SHAKSPER web site?
  2. Would you like to see The SBReviews continue?

The obvious follow-up question would be “Would you be willing to serve on The SBReviews Panel for a limited term?” (18 months, for example), but asking before I see if there is interest in continuing the project would be premature.

 

Any responses will be kept between the responder and myself and will not be posted.

 

Hardy Cook

Editor

 
 
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