1990

Rare Books Bitnet Seminar

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 130. Friday, 30 Nov 1990.
 
Date:         Fri, 30 Nov 90 19:07:10 EST
From:         Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:      Ex Libris Rare Book Discussion Group
 
[Yet another Bitnet discussion group which might interest members of
SHAKSPER has recently been brought to my attention by Roy Flannagan.
The complete version of this announcement is available on the SHAKSPER
Fileserver as EXLIBRIS ANNOUNCE, in the Related Bitnet Conferences
Area.  KS]
 
Announcing ExLibris, the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections
Electronic Discussion Group
 
ExLibris is an unmoderated news and discussion group for the purpose of
discussing matters related to rare book and manuscript librarianship, including
special collections and related issues.  Membership is open to anyone who
wishes to subscribe.  The contents are archived and will be printed off at a
future date for hard-copy donation to an appropriate collection.  The full
membership will be circulated from time to time unless objections are heard.
 
Feel free to forward this message to those who might be interested in
joining the discussions.  Please direct questions (but not subscriptions
to <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.  Thank you and enjoy yourselves.
 
You may subscribe by sending a message to:
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.
 
(do NOT send such messages directly to the ExLibris list or to this author)
with a subject indicating subscription request ("Subscription request" would
do just fine) and a text which gives your name and electronic address.  Give
the address in as full a form as you can (i.e. include the domain), e.g.
   Firstname J. Lastname    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.    OR
   Firstname J. Lastname    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   etc. etc.
 
Peter Graham, Rutgers U., (908) 932-2741
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Rutgers -- The State University of New Jersey.              Fax: (908) 932-5539
504 Hill Center / Piscataway, N. J. 08855 - 1179

Queries: Weeping Deer?

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 129. Friday, 30 Nov 1990.
 
 
(1)   Date: 30 November 1990, 07:39:21 EST                   (14 lines)
      From: FLANNAGA at OUACCVMB
      Subject: weeping deer
 
(2)   Date:         Fri, 30 Nov 90 18:22:01 EST              (55 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
      Subject:      Weeping Deer
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: 30 November 1990, 07:39:21 EST
From: FLANNAGA at OUACCVMB
Subject: weeping deer
 
In Act II, Scene i of *As You Like It*, an anonymous lord describes
seeing Jaques who himself is observing a deer wounded by hunters, weeping
into a stream.  Jaques moralizes and even politicises the event, saying
to the herd that fled their wounded companion "Sweep on, you fat and
greasy citizens."  But what I and my students worried about was how the
deer could cry.  Shakespeare, though he seems to observe Jaques as a
melancholy moralist skeptically, lets the weeping deer pass as a natural
possibility.  What gave Shakespeare the idea that a wounded deer could
cry enough tears to "augment" a stream?  Roy Flannagan
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------60----
Date:         Fri, 30 Nov 90 18:22:01 EST
From:         Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:      Weeping Deer
 
Several years ago I noticed that Shakespeare mentions weeping deer
only twice (to my knowledge), in *As You Like It* and in *Hamlet*.
A survey of occurrences of the words deer, hart, hind, doe, etc. in
proximity to tear, cry, weep, etc. produces only these three examples
in the Riverside Shakespeare (WordCruncher version):
 
                       As You Like It 2.1:47
    <1. Lord.>   O yes, into a thousand similes.
  First, for his weeping into the needless stream:
  "Poor deer," quoth he, "thou mak'st a testament
  As worldlings do, giving thy sum of more
  To that which had too [much]."  Then being there
 
                       As You Like It 2.1:66
   <Duke S.> And did you leave him in this contemplation?
   <2. Lord.> We did, my lord, weeping and commenting
 Upon the sobbing deer.
    <Duke S>                  Show me the place.
 I love to cope him in these sullen fits,
 
                       Hamlet 3.2:271
   <Pol.>  Lights, lights, lights!
                   <Exeunt all but Hamlet and Horatio.>
  <Ham.> "Why, let the strooken deer go weep,
                The hart ungalled play,
            For some must watch while some
 
 
Not only are these plays chronological neighbours, but I would argue
that they have many other similarities as well: usurping brothers,
an on-stage duel or physical contest, Hamlet's and Jaques' melancholies,
the descriptions of the conventional stricken lover (by Ophelia and by
Rosalind), the metatheatrical focus (the players at Elsinore and Jaques'
"All the world's a stage" speech, for example), and even the similarity
between "play false strains upon thee" (AYLI 4.3.68) and "play upon me"
(Hamlet 3.2.364).  Like RJ and MSND, these are two plays which work out
very similar materials in different genres, I think, and enlighten each
other greatly.  Has anyone noticed other paired plays like this in
Shakespeare?
 
I thought I had encountered an article or book on weeping deer, in fact,
but can't find the reference right now.  Does anyone have any recollection
of it?  Perhaps the scope was wider than just Shakespeare....
 
One explanation, at least, for the proverbial association of deer and
tears is that the shape of a deer's eye, with a tear duct (or something)
almost swollen at the front edge, does indeed look like a tear swelling
in its eye.  Any more reasoned explanations?
 
                                             Ken Steele
                                             University of Toronto

REED, Early Music Discussion Groups

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 127. Thursday, 29 Nov 1990.
 
(1)   Date:         Thu, 29 Nov 90 16:13:58 EST              (61 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
      Subject:      Records of Early English Drama Bitnet Seminar
 
(2)   Date:         Thu, 29 Nov 90 16:16:38 EST              (64 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
      Subject:      Early Music Bitnet Discussion Group
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:         Thu, 29 Nov 90 16:13:58 EST
From:         Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:      Records of Early English Drama Bitnet Seminar
 
REED-L: Records of Early English Drama Bitnet List
 
[I have taken this introduction to REED-L from the first mailing
in the REED logbooks.  KS]
 
A good way to start, I think, is to explain what REED is about.
The statement at the front of our volumes states:  "The aim of
Records of Early English Drama (REED) is to find, transcribe, and
publish external evidence of dramatic, ceremonial, and minstrel
activity in Great Britian before 1642."  In pursuit of that goal,
REED has brought out thus far records collections for York,
Coventry, Chester, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Norwich 1540-1642 (pre-1540
Norwich is in progress), Cumberland, Westmoreland,
Gloucestershire (those three bound in one volume), Devon, and the
town and university of Cambridge.
 
As you can see, REED started off with areas distinguished by cycle
drama, and has been moving into less well known material with
the county collections.  The collections currently under
preparation are also county ones: Herefordshire and
Worcestershire.  A good deal of folk activity, such as Robin Hood
plays and morris dancing, is emerging in the county volumes.
 
Part of the goal of the collections is to print the primary
source material with as little editorial interpretation as
possible, leaving the interpretative activity for a different
forum.  Those of you who are up on theatre history debates in
North America at least will be aware that recently some have
questioned the possibility of success, or even the propriety,
of such an attempt.
 
Over the course of the published collections, REED has
progressively cast its nets more widely as we have come to
recognise a wider range of activities which could be classified
as dramatic or semi-dramatic and as we have realised the
possibilities in types of archives whose importance was not
originally understood.  It is to be hoped that this kind of
development will continue for the life of the project.
 
REED is not officially or formally sponsoring this discussion group,
except insofar as we are using the REED computer account.  Opinions
expressed by me are thus simply my opinions and should not be taken as
expressions of policy!  The goal is to discuss, even argue, about
matters which pertain to the sort of activity documented in REED and
Malone Society volumes.
 
Abigail Ann Young, Research Associate
Records of Early English Drama
REED@UTOREPAS or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
The REED-L List itself is <REED-L@utoronto>, but to subscribe please
send the following command: TELL LISTSERV@utoronto SUB REED-L your name.
Anything sent to <REED-L@utoronto> will be echoed to the entire group;
anything sent to <REED@utorepas> will reach the editor.
 
This file is available on the SHAKSPER Fileserver as REED-L ANNOUNCE.
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------47----
Date:         Thu, 29 Nov 90 16:16:38 EST
From:         Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:      Early Music Bitnet Discussion Group
 
Early Music Redistribution List
 
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> (Early Music Redistribution)
 
Editor:  GONTER@AWIWUW11 (Gerhard Gonter)
 
As stated in the announcement, this list is provisorially hosted at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., until we find a better distribution facility.
This list is not a LISTSERV discussion group, which has pros and cons.
  cons:
    * fewer distribution features
    * no online database
    * no automatic handling of administrative requests
  pros:
    * full fledged natural language interface to handle your requests
    * editor to help you, if necessary
 
Please send your contributions *and* requests to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Why did I write `proposal' in the announcement?
Well ... some people argued, that there is not much interest in this
topic at all. On the other hand, the number of subscribers is almost
hitting the mark of 50 right now.
 
List of Topics:
  Anything about EARLY MUSIC (medieval, renaissance etc.)
  including discussions/comments/questions about
  a) (new) records
  b) books
  c) performances
  d) song texts & translations
  e) encoding early music scores in electronic form
  f) concert/festival announcements
  etc...
 
To become a member of the Early Music Discussion Group, send a
subscription query to <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.
 
This file is available as MUSIC ANNOUNCE on the SHAKSPER Fileserver.
 
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For further information, consult the appropriate section of your
SHAKSPER GUIDE, or contact the editor, <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
or <KSTEELE@utorepas>.

More Errors in ETC Riverside Shakespeare

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 128. Thursday, 29 Nov 1990.
 
Date:         Thu, 29 Nov 90 16:44:05 EST
From:         Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:      More Errors in the ETC Riverside Shakespeare
 
 
As many of you may already know, the file RIVERSID ERRORS on the
SHAKSPER Fileserver contains a listing of errors I have found in
the Electronic Text Corporation WordCruncher Riverside Shakespeare.
This is the first addendum to the file, consisting of eight cases
of mistaken punctuation: in every case, two commas have been
substituted for quotation marks.  (And in one case, the speech
prefix has been truly garbled as a result).
 
I ask you all once more to report any errors you may find in the
Riverside Shakespeare text, so that they can be added to the
RIVERSID ERRORS file on the SHAKSPER Fileserver.  Naturally,
any errors found in that list should also be reported to me.
 
                                            Ken Steele
                                            University of Toronto
 
 
|L43 <tellus,"> I trust you not, <"Hic steterat Priami,',> take
    (Taming of The Shrew 3.1:43)
 
|L343   <Speed.  "Item,> She is curst.,,
    (Two Gentlemen of Ver 3.1:343)
 
           [Note that here, even the speech prefix identification
            has been garbled.]
 
|L21 cur is that?" says another.  "Whip him out,', says
    (Two Gentlemen of Ver 4.4:21)
 
|L20 And world's exile is death; then "banished,,
    (Romeo and Juliet 3.3:20)
 
|L19 "Call me not fool till heaven hath sent me fortune.,,
    (As You Like It 2.7:19)
 
|L113 "In her excellent white bosom, these, etc.,,
    (Hamlet 2.2:113)
 
|L97              For such a guest is meet.,,
                                <[Throws up another skull.]>
    (Hamlet 5.1:97)
 
|L162 hair is my father, and all the rest are his sons.,,
    (Troilus & Cressida 1.2:162)

1991 SAA Seminar Papers on SHAKSPER

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 126. Wednesday, 28 Nov 1990.
 
Date:         Wed, 28 Nov 90 17:19:31 EST
From:         Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:      1991 SAA Seminar Papers on SHAKSPER Fileserver
 
    SHAKSPER was originally conceived as a year-round forum to
perpetuate discussion initiated by conference papers and seminars
at the annual Shakespeare Association meetings, to store copies of
seminar papers for easy retrieval by auditors, and to facilitate the
advance planning of such seminars.
 
    SHAKSPER is now taking the first tentative steps in this
direction, with the inauguration of a Fileserver area devoted to
abstracts and seminar papers for the 1991 Shakespeare Association
of America conference (scheduled for Vancouver, British Columbia,
March 21-23).  Seven members of SAA Seminar 3, "Shakespeare's
Quartos: Text, Performance, Memory," including its two leaders,
Linda Anderson and Janis Lull, are already members of
SHAKSPER, and have agreed to circulate electronic copies of their
abstracts and papers via the SHAKSPER Fileserver.
 
    SHAKSPEReans interested in auditing Seminar 3, or interested
in the subject but unable to attend the Vancouver conference, are
welcome to retrieve abstracts and papers, and to participate in the
advance discussions here on SHAKSPER, which I hope will be both
vigorous and thought-provoking.  Conventional mail has always
allowed seminar members to read each other's papers in
preparation for conferences, and occasionally to write responses.
SHAKSPER, however, should permit dialogue to a revolutionary
degree: seminar members and auditors can review abstracts, make
comments and suggestions, adapt their research in response to this
discussion, and distribute final papers.  It is my hope that this
experiment will prove sufficiently successful to demonstrate the
potential of electronic mail and SHAKSPER to the Shakespeare
Association at large.
 
    SHAKSPEReans writing papers for other sessions at the 1991
SAA conference are also heartily encouraged to submit electronic
copies of abstracts, drafts, and/or completed papers to me for
inclusion on the SHAKSPER Fileserver.  Authors are welcome to
ask fellow SHAKSPEReans for comments and suggestions on
abstracts or draft papers, or to raise related issues in notes or
queries.  (Please see the guidelines for submitted files in the new
version of the SHAKSPER GUIDE, available from the Fileserver.)
 
    For now, then, let me announce the first abstract in the
Seminar 3 area of the Fileserver: Skip Shand's "Queen of the First
Quarto," a performance-oriented study of the figure of Gertrude in
the first quarto of *Hamlet*.  (Stored as SHAND ABSTRACT on the
Fileserver.)  More abstracts should be joining it by the end of
November, and final papers should be in place by February.  Let
me encourage seminar members and especially SHAKSPEReans
unable to attend the conference to discuss questions raised by
these abstracts and papers right here on SHAKSPER.  I have no
doubt that there will be plenty left to say in Vancouver!
 
                                      Ken Steele
                                      University of Toronto
 
[General information on the 1991 SAA Conference and its Programme
can be found in the file VANCOUVR CONFERNC on the SHAKSPER Fileserver.]

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