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Home :: Archive :: 1990 :: November ::
Shakespearean Spinoffs
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 102. Friday, 16 Nov 1990.
 
 
(1)   Date:   Thu, 15 Nov 90 16:05:00 EST                     (8 lines)
      From:   [Norman Miller] 
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      Subject: Re: SHK 1.0101  More Shakespearean Spinoffs
 
(2)   Date:   Thu, 15 Nov 90 23:24:19 EST                    (40 lines)
      From:   Lawrence Schimel <SCHLAWD@YALEVM>
      Subject:      Re: Recording Spinoffs
 
(3)   Date:         Fri, 16 Nov 90 13:24:47 EST              (23 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <
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 >
      Subject:      Spinoff Bibliography for Fileserver
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:   Thu, 15 Nov 90 16:05:00 EST
From:   [Norman Miller] 
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Subject: 1.0101  More Shakespearean Spinoffs
Comment: Re: SHK 1.0101  More Shakespearean Spinoffs
 
Has Edmund Wilson's "The Duke of Palermo" been mentioned yet?  Not
worth the reading as I recall except as a pretty obvious self-portrait
(with many masks) of that sour paranoid misanthropic fascinating man.
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------61----
Date:   Thu, 15 Nov 90 23:24:19 EST
From:   Lawrence Schimel <SCHLAWD@YALEVM>
Subject:      Re: Recording Spinoffs
 
I'm glad the field of Science Fiction and Fantasy was mentioned in an
earlier posting because there are a number of spinoffs that have not
yet been mentioned in those genres.  Most of these deal with material
from *A Midsummer Night's Dream* and/or the Tempest.  So far, the ones
I have located are L. Sprague De Camp and Fletcher Pratt's *The Land of
Unreason*, Poul Anderson's *A Midsummer Night's Tempest*, and the
horror novel by Raymond Feist, *Fairy Tale*, which uses characters
from both of the aforementioned plays.  Another novel dealing with
Shakespeare is *Her Majesty's Wizard* by Christopher Stasheff, in
which all the spells are actually quotes from Shakespeare.  Aside from
these novels there is the short story by Isaac Asimov entitled
"The Immortal Bard," in which a monkey (re)writes Shakespeare.  I still
haven't managed to locate where the story was printed, but it will no
doubt be in the new series of Asimov's complete collected works being
published now.
 
In more canonical or classically "literary" venues is the play *Bingo*
by Edward Bond which deals with Shakespeare's declining years.  There
is a sequel to *The Taming of the Shrew* written by John Fletcher
(Thatcher?-Alas, I can't read my notes.) entitled *The Woman's Cries or
The Tamer Tamed*.  I have a date in the margin (1604-1617) but am no
longer sure what it means.  Sorry I don't have many specifics about
this reference.  There are also two poems for which I have incomplete
information.  One is "Shylock" by Fiona ? ?, I believe she's a British
writer and saw her name again in the current *Poetry Review* today but
forgot to write it down.  The other is "Exit, Pursued by a Bear" by an
author whose name I've completely forgotten. In addition there was a
student production put on last year, here at Yale, entitled
*Hamletmachine*, which I don't have any more information on.
Unfortunately, most of my (re)sources shut down over the break so I
may be delayed in finding this missing information.
 
Lawrence Schimel
Yale University
SCHLAWD@YALEVM
 
(3) --------------------------------------------------------------28----
Date:         Fri, 16 Nov 90 13:24:47 EST
From:         Ken Steele <
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 >
Subject:      Spinoff Bibliography for Fileserver
 
Fellow SHAKSPEReans;
 
It is reassuring to see a discussion like that of "Spinoffs" taking off
as it has, and I hope it will flourish for some time yet (so do keep
sending your ideas -- some of the descriptions are fascinating!).
 
Lawrence Schimel of Yale University has generously offered to
begin compiling and revising a bibliography of the poems, novels,
films, (etc.) which members report, for permanent inclusion on the
SHAKSPER Fileserver.  The first version will be announced when it
becomes available.
 
And please bear in mind that any additional topics for discussion
are welcome and can flourish simultaneously; the digest format of
SHAKSPER is designed to permit any number of parallel
conversations.
 
                                      Ken Steele
                                      University of Toronto
 

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