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Home :: Archive :: 1990 :: November ::
Shakespearean Spinoffs
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 104. Sunday, 18 Nov 1990.
 
 
(1)   Date:   Sat, 17 Nov 90 03:38:25 EST                    (12 lines)
      From:   Lawrence Schimel <SCHLAWD@YALEVM>
      Subject:      Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
(2)   Date:   Fri, 16 Nov 90 23:01:36 EST                    (10 lines)
      From:   Lawrence Schimel <SCHLAWD@YALEVM>
      Subject:      Rest of Name
 
(3)   Date:   Sat, 17 Nov 90 13:59:00 EST                    (82 lines)
      From:   "Hardy M. Cook" <
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      Subject: Shakespeare Spinoffs -- Films
 
(4)   Date:   Sat, 17 Nov 90 13:59:00 EST                    (98 lines)
      From:   "Hardy M. Cook" <
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      Subject: Shakespeare Spinoffs -- Literary
 
(5)   Date:         Sun, 18 Nov 90 00:03:13 EST              (21 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <
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      Subject:      Spinoffs
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:   Sat, 17 Nov 90 03:38:25 EST
From:   Lawrence Schimel <SCHLAWD@YALEVM>
Subject:      Shakespeare Spinoffs
 
While I'm remembering this and have access to a terminal I'd like to
mention Sir John Gielgud's performance piece *The Ages of Man*, based on
the book/anthology of the same title arranged by George Rylands.  Both
pieces are constructed out of lines drawn from entire body of
Shakespeare's work.  So in a way, it is not truly a spinoff, as it
actually is Shakespeare.  But it does in my opinion count as one
because of the way they are arranged.
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------34----
Date:   Fri, 16 Nov 90 23:01:36 EST
From:   Lawrence Schimel <SCHLAWD@YALEVM>
Subject:      Rest of Name
 
This is just a short note saying I found the poet's name who wrote
"Shylock."  It is Fiona Pitt-Kethly.  I thought it was very well done.
If you can find it, I don't know where it was first published or if it
is collected.  I received it as a photocopy of someone's retyped
version.
 
(3) --------------------------------------------------------------106---
Date:   Sat, 17 Nov 90 13:59:00 EST
From:   "Hardy M. Cook" <
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Subject: Shakespeare Spinoffs -- Films
 
 
I have a few more offerings for the ongoing discussion of Shakespearean
spinoffs.
 
*The Folger Shakespeare Filmography* has a section on Feature Length
Adaptations or Derivatives and Dance Musical, or Operatic Versions, to
which I have added a few titles.
 
Feature Length Adaptations or Derivatives :
 
     HAMLET:   Ernst Lubitsch's 1942 *To Be or Not to Be*
               Helmut Kautner's 1960 *The Rest Is Silence*
               Akira Kurosawa's 1963 *The Bad Sleep Well*
               Claude Chabrol's 1963 *Ophelia*
               [Mel Brook's 1983 remake of *To Be or Not to Be*]
 
     HENRY VI:  John Adolfi's 1929 *Show of Shows*
 
     JULIUS CAESAR:   Geofrey Grayson's 1960 *An Honourable Murder*
 
     JULIUS CAESAR, ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA: Gerald Thomas's 1964
                                *Carry on Cleo*
 
     KING LEAR:
               Edward Dmytryk's 1954 *Broken Lance*
               Joseph Mankiewicz's 1949 *House of Strangers*
               James Clark's 1961 *The Big Show*
 
     MACBETH:  Ken Hughes's 1955 *Joe Macbeth*
               Akira Kurosawa's 1957 *Throne of Blood*
 
     OTHELLO:  Walter Reish's 1937 *Man Are Not Gods*
               George Cukor's 1947 *A Double Life*
               Camillo Mastrocinque's 1953 *Anna's Sin*
               Delmar Davis's 1956 *Jubal*
               Basil Dearden's 1962 *All Night Long*
 
     MERRY WIVES, HENRY IV, HENRY V:
               Orson Welles's 1966 *Falstaff: Chimes at Midnight*
 
     RICHARD III:
               Rowland Lee's 1939 *Tower of London*
               Roger Corman's 1962 *Tower of London*
 
     ROMEO AND JULIET:
               Lionel Barrymore's "Romeo and Juliet" Sequence from the
                     1929 *The Hollywood Review*
               Miguel Delgado's 1944 *Romeo and Juliet*
               Gerald Thomas's 1959 *Carry on Teacher*
               Jiri Weiss's 1960 *Sweet Light in a Dark Room*
               Peter Ustinov's 1961 *Romanoff and Juliet*
               George Sherman's 1964 *Panic Button*
               A. P. Stootsberry's 1969 *The Secret Sex Lives of Romeo and
                    Juliet*
 
     THE TEMPEST:
               Fred Wilcox's 1956 *Forbidden Planet*
               Philip Dunne's 1955 *Prince of Players*
               [Paul Mazursky's 1982 *Tempest*]
 
Dance Musical, or Operatic Versions:
 
               Edward Sutherland's 1940 *The Boys from Syracuse*
               Georg Wildhagen's 1952 *The Merry Wives of Windsor*
               George Tressler's 1965 *The Merry Wives of Windsor*
               Dan Eriksen's 1967 *A Midsummer Night's Dream*
               Walter Strate's 1950 *Othello*
               Patrick McGoohan's 1973 *Catch My Soul*
               Lev Arnshtam's and Leonid Lavrovsky's 1954 *The Ballet of
                    Romeo and Juliet*
               Robert Wise's and Jerome Robbins's 1961 *West Side Story*
               Rovira-Beleta's 1964 *Los Tarantos*
               Paul Czinner's 1966 *Romeo and Juliet*
               George Sidney's 1953 *Kiss Me Kate*
 
        Hardy Cook
        
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(4) --------------------------------------------------------------122---
Date:   Sat, 17 Nov 90 13:59:00 EST
From:   "Hardy M. Cook" <
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Subject: Shakespeare Spinoffs -- Literary
 
 
Lawrence Schimel in his recent posting writes, "there is the short story
by Isaac Asimov entitled "The Immortal Bard," in which a monkey
(re)writes Shakespeare.  I still haven't managed to locate where the
story was printed, but it will no doubt be in the new series of Asimov's
complete collected works being published now."
 
Actually, "The Immortal Bard" from *Earth Is Room Enough* is about two
professors at a Christmas cocktail party.  A physics professor
announces to a young English instructor that he can "bring back the
spirits of the illustrious dead."  The English instructor bites and is
told that the physics professor has already brought back Shakespeare.
Dr. Welsh, the physics professor, explains that after informing
Shakespeare that "people had written volumes of commentaries on his
plays," the stunned playwright also learns that "we even gave college
courses in Shakespeare."   The English instructor, Scott Robertson,
announces, "I give one."  To which, Dr. Welsh responds, "I know.  I
enrolled him in your evening extension course.  I never saw a man so
eager to find out what posterity thought of him as poor Bill was.  He
worked hard at it."  This is how the story ends:
 
          "You enrolled William Shakespeare in my course?"
          mumbled Robertson.  Even as an alcoholic fantasy, the
          thought staggered him.  And WAS it an alcoholic
          fantasy?  He was beginning to recall a bald man with a
          queer way of talking . . . .
 
          "Not under his real name, of course," said Dr. Welsh.
          "Never mind what he went under.  It was a mistake,
          that's all.  A big mistake.  Poor fellow."  He had the
          cocktail now and shook his head at it.
 
          "Why was it a mistake?  What happened?"
 
          "I had to send him back to 1600," roared Welsh
          indignantly.  "How much humiliation do you think a man
          can stand?"
 
          "What humiliation are you talking about?"
 
          "Dr. Welsh tossed off the cocktail.  "Why, you poor
          simpleton, you FLUNKED him."
 
As I mentioned in my earlier posting on the subject, this short
story is included in Marilyn Schoenbaum's *A Shakespeare
Merriment.*
 
Here is a list of the other entries in this collection:
 
     John Manningham "William the Conqueror Anecdote"
     Samuel Johnson "Shakespeare as Horseholder"
     Henry Fielding from *Tom Jones*
     Oliver Goldsmith "A Reverie at the Boar's-Head-Tavern in
          Eastcheap"
     Washington Irvin "Stratford-on-Avon," from *The Sketch Book*
     Mark Twain "An Arkansaw Difficulty," from *The Adventures of
          Huckleberry Finn*
     Charles Dickens from *Great Expectations*
     Oscar Wilde "The Portrait of Mr. W. H."
     Rudyard Kipling "Proofs of Holy Writ"
     George Bernard Shaw "The Dark Lady of the Sonnets"
     Maurice Baring "Lady Macbeth's Trouble," from *Unreliable
          History*
     Richard Armour "Shakespeare's Life," from *Twisted Tales
          from Shakespeare*
     Robert Manson Myers from *Beowulf to Virginia Woolf*
     Caryl Brahms and S. J. Simon "The Naming of the Globe," from
          *No Bed for Bacon*
     Leonard Q. Ross (Leo Rosten) "Mr. K*A*P*L*A*N and
          Shakespeare," from *The Education of H*Y*M*A*N
          K*A*P*L*A*N*
     James Thurber "The Macbeth Murder Myster," from *My World --
          And Welcome to It*
     Wolcott Gibbs "Ring Out, Wild Bells," from *Bed of Neuroses*
     Richard Curtis "The Skinhead Hamlet," from *Not 1982*
     Isaac Asimov "The Immortal Bard," from *Earth Is Room
          Enough*
     Banesh Hoffman "Shakespeare the Physcist"
     Don Marquis "pete the parrot and shakespeare," from *archy
          and mehitabel*
     James Joyce from *Ulysses*
     Tom Stoppard from *Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead*
     Woody Allen "But Soft . . . Real Soft," from *Without
          Feathers*
 
It also occurs to me that on the literary front no one has as yet
mentioned Tennyson's "Mariana" or Browning's "Caliban upon
Setebos."  Of course, there are also Veridi's operas *Macbeth*,
*Otello*, and *Falstaff*.
 
     Hardy Cook
     
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(5) --------------------------------------------------------------21----
Date:         Sun, 18 Nov 90 00:03:13 EST
From:         Ken Steele <
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 >
Subject:      Spinoffs
 
 
(Incidentally, the more often I see the word "spinoff" the more I wish
there were another term...)
 
My bookshelf yields a few other titles for our project:
 
John Hulme, "ed."  *Guillaume Chequespierre and the Oise Salon*.
     (New York: Harper & Row, 1985).
 
     Amusing French "translations" of famous passages from
     Shakespeare.  (I transcribed the funniest of these in
     SHAKSPER 1.0060, Monday 17 Sep 1990).
 
Richard Armour, *Twisted Tales from Shakespeare*.  1957.  rpt Signet 1966.
 
Anthony Burgess, *Nothing Like the Sun: A Story of Shakespeare's Love-Life*.
     (1964.  rpt. Hamlyn 1982).
 

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