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Home :: Archive :: 1990 :: November ::
Montano/Mountanto?
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 123. Wednesday, 28 Nov 1990.
 
 
(1)   Date: 28 November 1990, 09:02:36 EST                    (7 lines)
      From: FLANNAGA at OUACCVMB
      Subject: [Montano Query]
 
(2)   Date:         Wed, 28 Nov 90 16:20:13 EST              (22 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
      Subject:      Mountanto/Montano
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: 28 November 1990, 09:02:36 EST
From: FLANNAGA at OUACCVMB
Subject: [Montano Query]
 
Don't have any books handy, but Beatrice puns on, what "Snr. Mountano,"
in *Much Ado*.  Are the two connected?  Roy
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------26----
Date:         Wed, 28 Nov 90 16:20:13 EST
From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Subject:      Mountanto/Montano
 
 
In *Much Ado About Nothing*, at 1.1.25, Beatrice refers to Benedick
as "Signior Mountanto", yes.  I'm not sure how to connect this to
the other incidents, but perhaps someone has an idea.  (Also the *Othello*
reference is a loose end right now).
 
I've been refining my idea a bit, and now realize that I didn't quite
make the case as convincing as I could have.  Suppose Q1 Hamlet reports
Reynaldo's name as "Montano" as a reflection of the source play, the
*Ur-Hamlet*, rather than a reflection of a change made in performance
to avoid offense.  In that case, Shakespeare could be seen avoiding
"Montano" in the source material for *Hamlet* and "Montanus" in
the source material for *As You Like It* (plays written consecutively
or simultaneously by most chronologies!).  Is this getting more
interesting?  More convincing, anyway?
 
                                         Ken Steele
                                         University of Toronto
From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Subject: Montano/Mountanto?
Comment:      SHK 1.0123  Montano/Mountanto?
To:           Shakespeare Electronic Conference <SHAKSPER@UTORONTO>
 
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 123. Wednesday, 28 Nov 1990.
 
 
(1)   Date: 28 November 1990, 09:02:36 EST                    (7 lines)
      From: FLANNAGA at OUACCVMB
      Subject: [Montano Query]
 
(2)   Date:         Wed, 28 Nov 90 16:20:13 EST              (22 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
      Subject:      Mountanto/Montano
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: 28 November 1990, 09:02:36 EST
From: FLANNAGA at OUACCVMB
Subject: [Montano Query]
 
Don't have any books handy, but Beatrice puns on, what "Snr. Mountano,"
in *Much Ado*.  Are the two connected?  Roy
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------26----
Date:         Wed, 28 Nov 90 16:20:13 EST
From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Subject:      Mountanto/Montano
 
 
In *Much Ado About Nothing*, at 1.1.25, Beatrice refers to Benedick
as "Signior Mountanto", yes.  I'm not sure how to connect this to
the other incidents, but perhaps someone has an idea.  (Also the *Othello*
reference is a loose end right now).
 
I've been refining my idea a bit, and now realize that I didn't quite
make the case as convincing as I could have.  Suppose Q1 Hamlet reports
Reynaldo's name as "Montano" as a reflection of the source play, the
*Ur-Hamlet*, rather than a reflection of a change made in performance
to avoid offense.  In that case, Shakespeare could be seen avoiding
"Montano" in the source material for *Hamlet* and "Montanus" in
the source material for *As You Like It* (plays written consecutively
or simultaneously by most chronologies!).  Is this getting more
interesting?  More convincing, anyway?
Received: from vm.epas.utoronto.ca by VM.UTCS.UTORONTO.CA (Mailer R2.07) with
 BSMTP id 2860; Wed, 28 Nov 90 16:31:24 EST
Received: by UTOREPAS (Mailer R2.03A) id 4995; Wed, 28 Nov 90 16:30:40 EST
Date:         Wed, 28 Nov 90 16:30:22 EST
From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Subject: Montano/Mountanto?
Comment:      SHK 1.0123  Montano/Mountanto?
To:           Shakespeare Electronic Conference <SHAKSPER@UTORONTO>
 
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 123. Wednesday, 28 Nov 1990.
 
 
(1)   Date: 28 November 1990, 09:02:36 EST                    (7 lines)
      From: FLANNAGA at OUACCVMB
      Subject: [Montano Query]
 
(2)   Date:         Wed, 28 Nov 90 16:20:13 EST              (22 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
      Subject:      Mountanto/Montano
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: 28 November 1990, 09:02:36 EST
From: FLANNAGA at OUACCVMB
Subject: [Montano Query]
 
Don't have any books handy, but Beatrice puns on, what "Snr. Mountano,"
in *Much Ado*.  Are the two connected?  Roy
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------26----
Date:         Wed, 28 Nov 90 16:20:13 EST
From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Subject:      Mountanto/Montano
 
 
In *Much Ado About Nothing*, at 1.1.25, Beatrice refers to Benedick
as "Signior Mountanto", yes.  I'm not sure how to connect this to
the other incidents, but perhaps someone has an idea.  (Also the *Othello*
reference is a loose end right now).
 
I've been refining my idea a bit, and now realize that I didn't quite
make the case as convincing as I could have.  Suppose Q1 Hamlet reports
Reynaldo's name as "Montano" as a reflection of the source play, the
*Ur-Hamlet*, rather than a reflection of a change made in performance
to avoid offense.  In that case, Shakespeare could be seen avoiding
"Montano" in the source material for *Hamlet* and "Montanus" in
the source material for *As You Like It* (plays written consecutively
or simultaneously by most chronologies!).  Is this getting more
interesting?  More convincing, anyway?
 
                                         Ken Steele
                                         University of Toronto
 

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