1990

Folger Bibliographer Wanted?

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 93. Thursday, 8 Nov 1990.
 
Date:   Thu, 8 Nov 90 09:06:38 EST
From:   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject:   [Folger Bibliographer Wanted?]
 
From the rare book list, EXLIBRIS, I learned that a position is open at
the Folger Library for a bibliographer to describe and catalogue the 79
First Folios.  Does anyone else know anything more about the position?
It is, apparently, just a one-year appointment.  Roy Flannagan

Folger Bibliographer Wanted?

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 93. Thursday, 8 Nov 1990.
 
Date:   Thu, 8 Nov 90 09:06:38 EST
From:   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject:   [Folger Bibliographer Wanted?]
 
From the rare book list, EXLIBRIS, I learned that a position is open at
the Folger Library for a bibliographer to describe and catalogue the 79
First Folios.  Does anyone else know anything more about the position?
It is, apparently, just a one-year appointment.  Roy Flannagan

Elizabethan Fencing Practice (75)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 91. Monday, 5 Nov 1990.
 
 
(1)   Date:   Mon, 5 Nov 90 19:19:36 EST                     (19 lines)
      From:   Tom Horton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
      Subject: Fencing in Shakespeare
 
(2)   Date:         Mon, 05 Nov 90 20:07:47 EST              (38 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
      Subject:      Elizabethan Fencing Handbooks
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:   Mon, 5 Nov 90 19:19:36 EST
From:   Tom Horton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: Fencing in Shakespeare
 
A student of mine has become interested in the topic of fencing in works by
Shakespeare.  I believe an article in a recent Shakespeare Quarterly sparked
this off, but he has asked me to post a request for any help in information on
how he might find more on this.
 
Even the most basic help will be appreciated.  He's just an undergraduate, and
I'm just a computer scientist, you see.
 
Tom Horton
Department of Computer Science
Florida Atlantic University
Boca Raton, FL 33431  USA
Phone:  407/367-2674   FAX: 407/367-2800
INTERNET:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.        BITNET: HortonT@fauvax
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------42----
Date:         Mon, 05 Nov 90 20:07:47 EST
From:         Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:      Elizabethan Fencing Handbooks
 
 
    Tom Horton's student is referring to James L. Jackson's
article in *Shakespeare Quarterly* 41:3 (Fall 1990), pp. 281-98:
"'They Catch One Another's Rapiers': The Exchange of Weapons in
*Hamlet*."  Jackson's footnotes offer far more references to
fencing sources than any annotated bibliographies at my disposal.
 
    The most important and promising of these texts are the
following (in chronological order):
 
    *Giacomo Di Grassi his true Arte of Defence* (London, 1594)
 
    *Vincentio Saviolo his Practice* (London, 1595)
 
    George Silver, *Paradoxes of Defence* (London, 1599)
 
    Egerton Castle, *Schools and Masters of Fence* (London: G.
           Bell & Sons, 1910).
 
    Robert E. Morsberger, *Swordplay and the Elizabethan and
           Jacobean Stage*, Jacobean Drama Studies 37 (Salzburg,
           Austria: Universitat Salzburg, 1974).
 
Doubtless the Morsberger book will offer a more comprehensive
bibliography.  Hope this is of some help; I renew Tom's invitation
to other SHAKSPEReans to contribute additional information.
 
                                  Yours,
 
                                  Ken Steele
                                  University of Toronto
 
                                  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
                                   or <KSTEELE@utorepas>

Swordplay Sources (Cont'd) (26)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 92. Tuesday, 6 Nov 1990.
 
Date:   Tue, 6 Nov 90 08:24:38 EST
From:   Nicholas Ranson <R1NR@AKRONVM>
Subject: 1.0091  Elizabethan Fencing Practice
Comment:      Re: SHK 1.0091  Elizabethan Fencing Practice
 
Tom Horton's reference to the swordplay: the article is in Shakespeare
Quarterly 41 (1990): 281-298, "The Exchange of Weapons in Hamlet."
There are many good leads in the footnotes themselves.  The contemporary
manuals there referred to are: Giacomo Di Grassi his true Arte of
Defence (London, 1594); Vincentio Saviolo his Practice (London, 1595);
George Silver, Paradoxes of Defence (London, 1599).  These three texts
are available in the various microfilm reels made of the Early English
Books 1475-1640 (Short Title Catalogue base), published by University
Microfilms; use the cross-index volume after identifying the title
in the STC.  The old volume was Egerton Castle's Schools and Masters
of Fence (1893).  The final source mentioned by James Jackson in SQ is
Robert E. Morsberger, Swordplay and the Elizabethan and Jacobean Stage,
Jacobean Drama Studies 37 (Salzburg, Austria: Universitat Salburg, 1974)
Good luck.

"Voodoo" Macbeth Query

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 1, No. 90. Monday, 5 Nov 1990.
 
Date:   Sun, 4 Nov 90 19:30:00 EST
From:   "Hardy M. Cook" <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: Information about "Voodoo" MACBETH
 
A colleague of mine is researching the 1936 "Voodoo" *Macbeth*; he has
searched the Lincoln Center archives and is presently going through the
materials at the Fenwick Library at George Mason University. He is
particularly interested in the following:
 
        * the reception of the production afforded by the New York
          theatrical community;
        * the comments of Orson Welles, the director, regarding the
          above and his motive for casting blacks;
        * the reactions of others to the production;
        * possible revisions of original opinions by theatre critics
          of the time; and
        * governmental comments and reactions.
 
If anyone can help him, please contact me by e-mail (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
or write to Elliott Moffitt, Department of Humanities and Fine Arts, Bowie
State University, Bowie, Maryland 20715.
 
Thanks.

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