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Home :: Archive :: 1991 :: January ::
Machine-Readable Shakespeare Texts
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 27. Tuesday, 29 Jan 1991.
 
(1)   Date:   Tue, 29 Jan 91 21:55:22 EST                    (15 lines)
      From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
      Subject:  [Query: Machine-Readable Shakespeares?]
 
(2)   Date:         Tue, 29 Jan 91 22:38:27 EST              (46 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
      Subject:      Machine-Readable Shakespeares
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:   Tue, 29 Jan 91 21:55:22 EST
From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
Subject:  [Query: Machine-Readable Shakespeares?]
 
Help!  A colleague at CCNY asked for the source of an inexpensive
"standard" (i.e. edited) Works of Shakespeare or Plays in machine-
readable format...IBM/DOS, I guess.  I remember seeing the
advertisements for several, but I can't find them now, when I've
been asked.  Ah, filing!  Suggestions?  Sources?  He doesn't
particularly want to manipulate these things, just call them up
and use them as clips so he doesn't have to type in the text himself.
Oh, so simple?
 
                                           Steve Urkowitz
                                           City University of New York
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------51----
Date:         Tue, 29 Jan 91 22:38:27 EST
From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Subject:      Machine-Readable Shakespeares
 
I can think of a number of answers to Steve Urkowitz's question, but
perhaps others can supply information about less expensive alternatives.
 
Electronic Text Corporation (ETC) offers a machine-readable version of
the Houghton-Mifflin Riverside Shakespeare for use with their WordCruncher
text retrieval software.  (Requires IBM compatible with hard disk and
at least 512 K RAM.)  A full-page advertisement appeared in *Shakespeare
Quarterly* 39:1 (Spring 1988) on page 97.  The pricing listed there was
$99 (US) for each of four genres (Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and
Romances/Poems), $299 for the WordCruncher software (although I understand
that a limited run-time version is now included at no extra charge) and
$10 for a demo diskette.  Credit card orders can be placed toll free at
1-800-222-9409.  For further information, contact Electronic Text Corporation
at 5600 North University Ave., Provo, Utah, 84604  (801) 226-0616.
 
Naturally, the text is not perfect (see the file, RIVERSID ERRORS, on
the SHAKSPER Fileserver, for a partial list of some uncorrected typos),
but it is based on a standard edition.  I make regular use of this package,
and find it powerful and extremely user-friendly.  (I also understand that
a Windows 3.0 version of WordCruncher is now in the works...).  Anyone
who *thinks* they simply want to be able to cut and paste will find the
analysis and concording features of WordCruncher irresistible, and well
worth the investment.
 
For those interested in a somewhat less orthodox edition of Shakespeare,
there is the Electronic Complete Works (Modern Spelling) available from
Oxford Electronic Publishing.  I do not have current pricing information,
but I believe it is comparable in cost to the WordCruncher texts.  Oxford
has designed their texts for use with Micro-OCP, a concording package
available separately, but they are straight ASCII text with COCOA codes
inserted in angle brackets, and can be used with any word processor, if
you so desire.  In North America, contact Oxford Electronic Publishing at
200 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016  (212) 889-0206  or fax (212) 725-2972.
I have no personal experience with Oxford's package, but perhaps others do.
 
There are a number of other electronic Shakespeares out there, offering
"bargain" prices like $35 per play (which is about $1365 if you want the
whole canon!) or offering performance texts, like those published by the
Stratford (Ontario) Festival.  Perhaps others have information on these.
 
                                                 Ken Steele
                                                 University of Toronto
 

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