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Home :: Archive :: 1991 :: February ::
Query: "His very name shall bruise us"?
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 65. Sunday, 24 Feb 1991.
 
(1)   Date:   Sun, 24 Feb 1991 15:14:29 -0500                (19 lines)
      From:   Lawrence Schimel <SCHLAWD@YALEVM>
      Subject:      Unknown quote
 
(2)   Date:         Sun, 24 Feb 91 21:49:56 EST              (14 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
      Subject:      His very name doth bruise us?
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:   Sun, 24 Feb 1991 15:14:29 -0500
From:   Lawrence Schimel <SCHLAWD@YALEVM>
Subject:      Unknown quote
 
Robertson Davies gave a pair of lectures here at Yale last week in which he
dropped a quote from Shakespeare, "His very name doth bruise us."  I do not
recognize the quote and was hoping someone in the general membership of
SHAKSPER might.
 
It's also interesting that, at first glance at least, I thought today's Sunday
NYTimes crossword puzzle had Shakespeare as a theme, for the first two clues I
saw were a quote and a character from him.  While I knew both, further perusal
of the list showed these were the only ones.  Alas.  I wonder if anyone has
ever done a completely Shakespearen (quotes, characters, titles, etc...)
crossword puzzle?
 
Lawrence Schimel
SCHLAWD@YALEVM.BITNET
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------18----
Date:         Sun, 24 Feb 91 21:49:56 EST
From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Subject:      His very name doth bruise us?
 
I thought to answer Larry's question promptly with the electronic
Riverside Shakespeare, but it provides nothing remotely similar to
"His very name doth bruise us," nor do the quartos, nor does Milton
nor the King James Bible.  Is this a paraphrase of something
Shakespearean, or is it Shakespeare at all?  (It *sounds* like it
should come from *Julius Caesar*, but none of the occurrences of
"name" in that play are similar in sense).
 
                                            Ken
 

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