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Home :: Archive :: 1991 :: March ::
More on "Shog"
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 82. Tuesday, 12 Mar 1991.
 
(1)   Date: 11 March 1991, 18:29:45 EST                      (10 lines)
      From: FLANNAGA at OUACCVMB
      Subject: ["Shog"]
 
(2)   Date:         Tue, 12 Mar 91 23:38:44 EST              (33 lines)
      From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
      Subject:      "Shog"
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: 11 March 1991, 18:29:45 EST
From: FLANNAGA at OUACCVMB
Subject: ["Shog"]
 
One more note for any developing "shog" fans: the instance I mentioned
in *Henry V* is the first recorded (3.b) in the OED, meaning not "jog
off" but "begone," according to the editors.  Has anybody seen it
anywhere else?  When did "sod off" start usage, and isn't it connected
with Sodomites and "bugger off?"  Roy Flannagan
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------37----
Date:         Tue, 12 Mar 91 23:38:44 EST
From:         Ken Steele <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Subject:      "Shog"
 
It would indeed appear that Shakespeare uses the verb "shog" only
twice, as follows:
 
       *<S {Nym}.> Will you shogge off? I would haue you solus.
       *<S {Pist}.> Solus, egregious dog? O Viper vile . . .
 
                                              (Henry 5 (F1) 2.1:43)
 
       *<S {Nim}.> Shall wee shogg? the King will be gone from
        Southampton.
                                              (Henry 5 (F1) 2.3:43)
 
This gives us a little context, although it hardly explains the word.
 
Strangely, Eric Partridge (*Shakespeare's Bawdy*, London: Routledge &
Kegan Paul, 1968) fails to mention "shog" in any form, nor does he deal
with "sod" (DOS backwards?), but he offers the following for "sodden":
 
   sodden.  Heavy and dull and stupefied.  Bawd, in reference to her
   grossly overworked harlots: "The stuff we have, a strong wind will
   blow it to pieces, they are so pitifully sodden," *Pericles* 4.2.18-9.
   Cf. rotten -- OE soden, ex seothan (whence our seethe), "to boil;
   hence to cook."
 
Cf. *LLL*'s "bis coctus... twice sod simplicity!" (from memory).
 
None of this defines "shog," of course -- but it looks like a rather
different word to me.
 
                                               Ken Steele
                                               University of Toronto
 

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