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Home :: Archive :: 1991 :: March ::
Pedagogy: Videos, Flannagan Exam
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 83. Thursday, 14 Mar 1991.
 
(1)   Date:   Wed, 13 Mar 1991 07:43:00 -0500                 (9 lines)
      From:   
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      Subject: RE: SHK 2.0081  Videos in the Classroom
 
(2)   Date:   Thu, 14 Mar 1991 17:30:00 -0500                (34 lines)
      From:   [Stanley D. McKenzie] 
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      Subject: SHAKSPER: Flannagan Exam
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:   Wed, 13 Mar 1991 07:43:00 -0500
From:   
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Subject: 2.0081  Videos in the Classroom
Comment: RE: SHK 2.0081  Videos in the Classroom
 
Quick apology and clarification: while the tape Herb Coursen sent me does
have some Nunnery stuff on it, its main focus is on "Now might I do it pat."
 
Skip Shand
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------61----
Date:   Thu, 14 Mar 1991 17:30:00 -0500
From:   [Stanley D. McKenzie] 
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Subject: SHAKSPER: Flannagan Exam
 
I was delighted with Roy Flannagan's posting his final exam for
comments and may well "borrow" some of his questions for my own
future exams.  All of my own Shakespeare exams (for undergraduate
engineering, technology, science, and applied arts students) are
currently open-book and open-notes, with short essays on specific
passages from each of the plays being tested, plus a longer
global essay question.
 
What most struck me, however, in reading Prof. Flannagan's medium
and long answer questions was how difficult a time I would have
answering some of them (despite regularly teaching these plays
for the past 23 years) WITHOUT HAVING PARTICIPATED IN THE
SPECIFIC CLASS being tested.  Not only would the answers vary
among different schools of criticism, but even within a given
critical approach I could imagine constructing (and indeed having
read within the published criticism) quite contrary arguments
within the framework of these questions.
 
This led me to ponder for my own courses what exactly we should
be testing as a "Final Exam" on Shakespeare: how well the
students have absorbed what we have presented in the course? how
well the students can apply on their own the critical
approach(es) to which we have exposed them? the students' ability
to express in writing their own interactions with a text?  I
suspect that in practice I actually grade toward the first of
these, while liking to think that I am testing toward the second;
I am increasingly inclined to want to "test" toward the third,
but have no idea how I would go about assigning distinguishing
grades beyond "composition" criteria.
 

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