1991

Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan *AYLI*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 178. Tuesday, 25 Jun 1991.
 
Date: 		Tue, 25 Jun 1991 16:03 CST
From: 		Peter Scott  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
		Order Unit/U of Saskatchewan Library
Subject: 	Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan Festival presents
		*As You Like It*
 
Media Release 91.1 June 21, 1991
 
                THE SHAKESPEARE ON THE SASKATCHEWAN FESTIVAL
                          SEVENTH ANNUAL SUPERSHOW
 
                              *As You Like It*
 
                          Directed by Henry Woolf
               (University of Saskatchewan, Drama Department)
 
The Big Tents are up again on the banks of the South Saskatchewan River.
 
Come see the Bard at his best in the Magical comedy *As You Like It* --
a smash hit for four hundred years!  This time set in the Swinging 60's.
 
Bring the family, Groove to the Tunes, and Laugh your head off!
 
*As You Like It* runs from Saturday, July 6 to Sunday, August 18.
Performances are at 8:00 p.m. nightly, Tuesday to Sunday. Sunday Matinees
begin the week of July 14 at 2:00 p.m.
 
Tickets:
Shakespeare Box Office Booth (across from the Bessborough Hotel, next to
the Red Double Decker Bus).
Monday to Saturday 12:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
 
Festival Tent Site (next to the Mendel Art Gallery)
Sundays 1:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Adults $14.00  Students/Seniors $12.00  Children $7.00
Matinees: All tickets $10.00   Children 12 and under are free.
Call: 306-652-9100 for reservations
 
[posted by Peter Scott, Board member, Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan]

Call for Papers: Symbol Theory

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 177. Tuesday, 25 Jun 1991.
 
Date: 		Mon, 24 Jun 91  11:40:41 ADT
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject: 	Notice for SHAKSPER
 
You may be interested in passing on the information I recently received
concerning a forthcoming conference on "Aspects of Renaissance and Baroque
Symbol Theory (1500-1700)" to be held at the University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga in association with The Society for Emblem Studies.  This
"International Research Symposium" will be held 1-3 May 1992 and is being
organized by Peter M. Daly (McGill and U of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and
John Manning (Queen's University, Belfast).
 
The major part of the meetings will be centred on seminars devoted to
the following topics:
 
1. Terminology and Definitions (chaired by Bernhard F. Scholz, U of Utrecht)
2. Cultural Specificity (chaired by Karel Porteman, U of Leuven)
3. Seeing, Perceiving and Meaning (chaired by Daniel S. Russell, U of
     Pittsburgh)
4.  The authority of Signs (chaired by John Manning, Queen's U of Belfast)
 
The organizers state:  "Current literary theory has emphasised the importance
of signs and symbols for understanding cultural history, yet the origins of
the theories of sign and symbol have seldom been considered and surveyed
diachronically.  Images and symbols were, according to Renaissance philosophers
and theologians, unique to humankind.  Angels directly apprehended moral
entities; animals saw an object only as itself; but men and women alone
used objects as a means to know and understand abstract concepts.
RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE SYMBOL THEORY 1500-1700 will discuss the foundations
of this essentially human activity."
 
In addition to the seminars, there will be some sessions given over to
twenty-minute papers.  Enquiries for more detail on the seminars, offers of
papers, etc. should be sent to either of the following:
 
	Peter M. Daly, 310 Holt, U of Tennessee at Chattanooga,
	615 McCallie Avenue, Chattanooga TN 37403
 
	John Manning, School of English, The Queen's University of Belfast,
	Belfast BT7 1NN, U.K.
 
Offers of papers should indicate whether the paper is intended as a twenty-
minute presentation or as a contribution to one of the seminars.  The deadline
for offers of papers is 1 October 1991.  The full text of seminar papers
(10 copies) should reach the organisers by 1 February 1992 so that it can be
distributed to other participants.

Queries: Masques, Mourning Rings, Hypercard Stacks

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 175. Saturday, 22 Jun 1991.
 
(1) 	Date: 	Fri, 21 Jun 91 12:20:19 -0400
	From: 	This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Thomas G. Bishop)
	Subj: 	Performances of Jacobean Masques
 
(2)	Subj: 	Mourning rings mentioned in Shakespeare's will
	From: 	Zip Kellogg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Fri, 21 Jun 1991 15:03:42 -0400
 
(3)	Date: 	Wed, 19 Jun 91 18:23:45 EDT
	From: 	Mark Lee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	Re: 'Shakespeare's Life & Times'.
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Fri, 21 Jun 91 12:20:19 -0400
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Thomas G. Bishop)
Subject: 	Performances of Jacobean Masques
 
Can anyone on SHAKSPER give me any information about modern
performances/productions of Jacobean (or even Caroline) court masques?
I am especially interested in Jonson's, and in particular, "Oberon".
I believe the "Masque of Flowers" was performed at KALAMAZOO sometime
back there.  Productions either in U.S. or elsewhere, or information
about where to find out about any such would be welcome.
 
					Many thanks,
					Tom Bishop
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------------
					
Subject: 	Mourning rings mentioned in Shakespeare's will
From: 		Zip Kellogg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Fri, 21 Jun 1991 15:03:42 -0400
 
   In Shak's will, he mentioned that some money should go to his friends
Heminges, Condell, Burbage and others to buy memorial rings. Can anyone
tell me something of this practice to wear memorial rings and whether
any of them survived?
				Zip Kellogg, U. of Southern Maine Library
 
(3) --------------------------------------------------------------------
				
Date: 		Wed, 19 Jun 91 18:23:45 EDT
From: 		Mark Lee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:      	Re: 'Shakespeare's Life & Times'.
 
This appeared on ANSAXNET. I thought that perhaps that there might be MAC
users out there who would possibly want to contact Michael Best regarding the
hypercard stack.
 
Cheers,
+-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-+
| Mark Lee                | Phone: (202) 357-4222           |
| Smithsonian Institution | E-Mail: IRMSS908 @ SIVM.BITNET  |
+-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-+
 
*** Forwarding note from ANSAX-L --WVNVM    06/19/91 13:59 ***
 
'Shakespeare's Life & Times', Hypercard stack is available from
Professor Michael Best, Department of English, University of Victoria,
British Columbia, Canada V8W 3P4.  Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
	[Michael Best's Hypercard stack sounds like a remarkable tool.
	See SHAKSPER 2.0136 (Fri May 17, 1991) for a complete
	description of the program and its capabilities, or retrieve
	the file HYPRCARD STACK SHAKSPER from the SHAKSPER Fileserver.
	A free demo disk is also available on request. -- k.s.]

Archeology Update

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 176. Saturday, 22 Jun 1991.
 
From: 		Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Archeology Update
Date: 		Sat, 22 Jun 91 8:55:23 EDT
 
An interesting article by Paul Nelson, of Marlboro College VT, appears
in the Spring 1991 *Shakespeare Bulletin* under the title: "`We the
globe can compass soon': An Update on the Status of Archeology on
London's South Bank Theatres."  Although there hasn't been a great
deal of news lately, I think some of this article might interest
SHAKSPEReans.
 
After a hiatus which began in 1989, "keyhole" digging will begin in
the basement of the Anchor Terrace as soon as formal consent is obtained
from the Department of the Environment.  (Anchor Terrace, situated
above the Globe Theatre remains, is a "Grade II listed building" -- a
historic site in its own right.)  Construction of Sam Wanamaker's
International Shakespeare Globe Centre complex is awaiting more
detailed information regarding the diameter of the Globe remains (and
perhaps also additional funds).  Attempts to use "ground probing
impulse radar" have proven thus far inconclusive and disappointing,
but the archeological investigation of the Globe site is under none of
the urgent time constraints which faced the Rose Theatre site in 1989.
 
The eastern third of the Rose theatre site, not excavated in 1989, is
now also available for investigation.  Construction of the Imry
Merchant office tower on the Rose site is now apparently complete, and
thought is being given to the most appropriate way to exhibit the entire
Rose site for tourists.  Ironically, the current economic downturn leaves the
Imry Merchant office tower, constructed despite the urgent pleas of
scholars and performers, entirely without tenants.  (Which, I confess,
gives me some small satisfaction...).
 
Although the pace of investigation at both these sites will now be
considerably slower, and in the case of the Globe will be considerably
more tangled as a result of the "Ancient Monument" and "Historic Site"
designations, it is certain that both will now be investigated as
thoroughly as possible.
 
Do any other SHAKSPEReans have information to add?
 
					Ken Steele
					University of Toronto

Books on Shakespeare in Performance

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 174. Saturday, 22 Jun 1991.
 
Date: 		Thu, 20 Jun 1991 11:10:05 -0400
From: 		David Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Writings on Shakespeare in Performance
 
     I think Granville-Barker's prefaces contain some of our century's
best writing on Shakespeare in performance.  Every few years, I reread
them and learn new things from them.  Particularly incisive and
illuminating are the prefaces to *King Lear*, *Othello*, *The Merchant
of Venice*, *Cymbeline*, and *Love's Labour's Lost*.  Nearly seventy
years ago, Granville-Barker was saying good things about performers' and
producers' needs to disentangle the various Quarto and Folio texts.  His
advice to producers of *King Lear*--base your production on the Folio,
but incorporate a few things from the Quarto--is still quite sound.  (He
would add Q's mock trial and cut F's prophecy about Merlin.)
 
     Further insights into Shakespeare in performance can be gleaned
from Peter Hall's Diaries, published a few years ago, from both of
Olivier's Books (*Confessions of an Actor* and *On Acting*) and John
Barton's *Playing Shakespeare*.  Olivier has a fine description of his
preparation for the "Once more into the breach" speech.  Roberta Krensky
Cooper's history of the American Shakespeare Theatre at Stratford,
Connecticut is full of anecdotes about performance, and contains useful
extended interviews with Michael Kahn and Morris Carnovsky, among
others.  Her book allows the reader to compare and contrast several
performers' radically different approaches to the same role.  Comparing
Alfred Drake's light, charming Iago with Christopher Plummer's monster
of sublime egoism is particularly interesting.
 
     Finally, there is Robert Cohen's textbook *Acting Shakespeare*.
Though he is writing for acting students, he gives a lucid exposition of
the performer's complex intellectual and emotional preparation.
Non-performers might find his book useful, just as performers find use
in reading a book of criticism or scholarship now and again.  I would be
curious to hear about non-performers' reactions to Cohen's book.
 
					David Richman
					University of New Hampshire
					<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

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