1991

Response: BBC Casting and Cinematography

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 190. Sunday, 28 Jul 1991.
 
Date: 		Fri, 26 Jul 1991 11:35:15 -0400
From: 		Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	RE: Ron Cook as Richard and BBC First Tetralogy
 
Ron Cook played Richard in both the BBC *3H6* and *R3*.  My list of credits
for the entire BBC first tetralogy does not even list a Martin Shaw.  I have
not seen the box for the BBC video in some time, so I cannot explain the
anomaly.
 
I have an article on Jane Howell's work with the BBC first tetralogy that will
be published in the near future in *Literature/Film Quarterly*.  You may find
something in it to share with your class.  Below is a summary:
 
 
"JANE HOWELL'S BBC FIRST TETRALOGY: THEATRICAL AND TELEVISUAL MANIPULATION"
 
Jane Howell makes notable changes in her style as she proceeds through the
first tetralogy.  These changes reflect a consciously planned symbolic and
metaphoric manipulation of theatrical and televisual techniques.  Her lighting
changes from bright to dark; her set, from primary colored to dark gray and
from open to enclosed; and her costumes, from colorful to black and gray.
Furthermore, she moves from a textbook depth-of-field strategy to include
montage techniques and point-of-view cutting as well as moving from *very*
loose to increasingly tighter framing.
 
Besides her outstanding stylistic accomplishments, Jane Howell, in these four
productions, launches an all-out assault on the assumption that televised
Shakespeare must use "realistic" film techniques and naturalistic production
designs.  Howell maintains that producing Shakespeare's plays for television
differs greatly from doing them for film: "A great admirer of Orson Welles'
*Falstaff* . . . she points out that nevertheless film techniques are largely
irrelevant to the overall approach in these television Shakespeares."  In
fact, Howell consistently favors strategies subversive to representationalism.
 
The handling of soliloquies and asides manifests these differences among
televisual approaches.  Although direct address to the audience is common in
theatre, direct address by looking right into the camera is seldom used in
narrative film since this strategy destroys the illusion of the transparency
of the film image.  In Orson Welles's 1966 film *Falstaff: Chimes at
Midnight*, for example, characters never look straight into the camera during
asides and soliloquies.  Welles even transforms Falstaff's catechism on honor
into a direct address to Hal to prevent the possible artificiality of having a
character looking into the camera.  With the possible exception of voice-overs
or eliminating them altogether, having asides to the audience and soliloquies
spoken as if the character were thinking aloud and not looking at the camera
is the most naturalistic way of dealing with them on television.  In
television, especially televised theatre that strives for presentationalism
rather than representationalism, destroying the illusion of transparency by
techniques such as direct address to the camera is not only appropriate but
part of the very quality of television that makes it so intimate--its ability
to establish a direct partnership between the actor on the screen and the
often solitary spectator before the television set.  What is significant is
that a television director can, as Jane Howell has demonstrated, successfully
use techniques that a film director would not even consider using.
 
 
Hardy M. Cook
Bowie State Univeristy
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Notes & Queries: BBC *R3*; Tanselle's Syllabus

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 189.  Wednesday, 24 Jul 1991.
 
(1)	Date: Sat, 20 Jul 1991 06:57:35 -0400
	From: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
	Subj: Query: BBC Richard III
 
(2)	Date: Wed, 10 Jul 1991 08:13:25 EDT
	From: kos@CUNYVMS1
	Subj: Intro to Bibliography
 
(1)------------------------------------------------------
Date: 		Sat, 20 Jul 1991 06:57:35 -0400
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject: 	Query: BBC Richard III
 
The box containing my tape of [the BBC] *R3* says that
Martin Shaw plays Richard; the cast list at the end of
the performance names Ron Cook as playing him.  Can
someone tell me which is correct so I can tell my class?
And can you explain the error?
 
				Herb Donow
				Southern Illinois University
					at Carbondale
 
(2)------------------------------------------------------
Date: 		Wed, 10 Jul 1991 08:13:25 EDT
From: 		kos@CUNYVMS1
Subject: 	Intro to Bibliography
 
	[Reprinted from Humanist Discussion Group,
	Vol. 5, No. 0232. Tuesday, 16 Jul 1991.  - k.s.]
 
I just picked up a wonderful document:  The syllabus to
G. Thomas Tanselle's course "Introduction to
Bibliography" which he teaches at Columbia.  If you
are familiar with Tanselle's work, then you know that
this is not merely technical listings, but also a path to
various others disciplines, such as textual editing.
It's 100 pages long, single-spaced, double-sided (imagine
giving that to your one-semester class!), and filled with
all sorts of information.
 
It is available for $15 (postpaid) from: Book Arts Press,
Columbia University, School of Library Service,
516 Butler Library, New York, NY 10027
 
Enjoy.
			Bob Kosovsky
 
			Graduate Center
			(Ph.D. Program in Music)
			City University of New York
			New York Public Library--Music Division
 
			bitnet:   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
			internet: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Second Folio for Sale

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 187. Friday, 19 Jul 1991.
 
Date: 		Sun, 14 Jul 1991 19:53 CST
From: 		Peter Scott
		Order Unit/U of Saskatchewan Library
		<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Second folio for sale from Buddenbrooks
 
The following is for sale from Buddenbrooks, Boston, Mass.,
(617) 536-4433.
 
William Shakespeare. "Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies...the second
impression" (London: by Tho. Cotes for Robert Allot, 1632). The second
folio edition, first issue, first state of imprint. Engraved portrait by
Martin Droeshout on title page, woodcut ornaments and initials. Folio
(341x230mm.), bound in 18th century calf rebacked with backstrip laid
down, covers and edges lightly worn.          $35,000.00
 
[posted for information only. I have no connection with Buddenbrooks]
 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Waterloo Conference, SHAKSPER,

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 188.  Wednesday, 24 Jul 1991.
 
(1)	From: Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: Waterloo Conference on Elizabethan Theatre
	Date: Wed, 24 Jul 91 10:45:58 EDT
 
(2)	From: Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: Festival Laurier: Shakespeare's England
	Date: Wed, 24 Jul 91 10:45:58 EDT
 
(3)	From: Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: Interdisciplinary Colloquium: Perceptions of
			Women in the Renaissance
	Date: Wed, 24 Jul 91 10:45:58 EDT
 
(1)------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Waterloo Conference on Elizabethan Theatre
Date: 		Wed, 24 Jul 91 10:45:58 EDT
 
Dear Fellow SHAKSPEReans;
 
	My apologies, particularly to those who have
submitted notes, for the delays in distributing SHAKSPER
this week.  I have been spending my days at the
University of Waterloo, Ontario, for the 14th
International Conference on Elizabethan Theatre, "Women
and the Elizabethan Theatre" (and my evenings have been
spent unpacking crates at our new address).
 
	Other members of SHAKSPER in Waterloo this week
include Ed Pechter (Concordia), Kay Stockholder (UBC),
and Steven Urkowitz (CUNY); and I've also been pleased to
meet a number of scholars who are very interested in
joining us here on Bitnet, including Leeds Barroll
(Maryland), Alan Somerset (Western Ontario), and June
Schlueter (co-editor of *Shakespeare Bulletin*).  Look
for their names here soon.  (Incidentally, some of you
may also know Marga Munkelt, a West-German textual
scholar who has just gained network access in order to
join us here too.)
 
	The Waterloo conference, which has always been a
relaxed, intimate gathering, has 63 pre-registered
delegates this year, and an increasing number of graduate
students.  Unlike the larger SAA and ISA meetings, the
Waterloo conference has no parallel sessions and plenty
of spare time for conversation and/or dining.  (For
details on the papers being presented, see the tentative
schedule WATERLOO CONFRNCE SHAKSPER on the Fileserver).
Each evening of the four-day conference, delegates travel
to the Stratford (Ontario) Festival (this year they see
*MAAN*, *12N*, *Les Belles Soeurs*, *Hamlet*, and
*Timon*).  The conference is held every two years, and I
heartily recommend the next one to anyone who can attend.
(More information will be posted on the 1993 conference
as it becomes available).
 
	The following posting announces an eclectic
combination of Elizabethan events featuring
Shakespeareans Andrew Gurr and Jill Levenson, to be held
at Wilfrid Laurier University (Waterloo, Ontario) in
January 1992.  Hope to see some of you there!
 
						Ken
 
(2)------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Festival Laurier: Shakespeare's England
Date: 		Wed, 24 Jul 91 10:45:58 EDT
 
Festival Laurier presents... *SHAKESPEARE'S ENGLAND*
"A public week of Elizabethan culture and society and
pleasures."
 
January 15-22, 1992 at Wilfrid Laurier University
(Waterloo, Ontario)
 
Some highlights:
 
Wednesday 15 January, 8:00pm, Aird Centre Recital Hall
The Laurier Lecture Series presents Andrew Gurr
(University of Reading, England).  An authority on
theatre history in the English Renaissance, Professor
Gurr will speak on his work in the reconstruction of the
original Globe Theatre in Southwark.
 
This event will be followed by an Opening Night
reception.  Also at this time, a week-long exhibit of
Elizabethan artefacts, furniture, and dress will be
opened in the Laurier Art Gallery.
 
January 16, 17, 18, 8:00pm, Theatre Auditorium
Theatre Laurier presents *Hamlet, Prince of Denmark*.
(There will be an admission charge for this play.)
 
Saturday 18 January, 10:00am - 4:30pm, Paul Martin Centre
Academic Colloquium: "Perceptions of Women in the Arts
and Literature of the English Renaissance."  (Details
below).
 
Other Festival events include an Elizabethan food fair; a
Family Day on Sunday 19 January; musical concerts; a
poetry contest; Shakespearean scenes performed by
students in acting and directing courses; open lectures
and panels in regular courses in several Departments ...
and more.
 
For further information (as it becomes available),
contact:
 
Anne-Marie Tymec
Cultural Affairs Coordinator
Wilfrid Laurier University
Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5
(519) 884-1970 ext. 4882
 
 
(3)------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Interdisciplinary Colloquium: Perceptions of
			Women in the Renaissance
Date: 		Wed, 24 Jul 91 10:45:58 EDT
 
Festival Laurier 1992 ("Shakespeare's England") presents
an academic colloquium:
 
PERCEPTIONS OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS AND LITERATURE OF THE
ENGLISH RENAISSANCE
 
Saturday, January 18th, 1992
10:00am - 4:30pm
Paul Martin Centre
 
Professor Linda Woodbridge (English Department,
University of Alberta), "Women and English Renaissance
Literature: Perceptions and Representations."
 
Professor Jill Levenson (English Department, University
of Toronto), "His Mistress's Voice: the Poetry of
Politics in *Romeo & Juliet*."
 
Professor Michael Purves-Smith (Faculty of Music, Wilfrid
Laurier University), "Women and Music in Shakespeare's
England."
 
Professor Ilse Friesen (Fine Arts Department, Wilfrid
Laurier University) and Dr. Carolyn Whitney-Brown, "Women
and Class in the Art of the Late Renaissance."
 
To be Followed by an Open Reception.

*MV* & Censorship; Outdoor Shakespeares

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 186. Sunday, 14 Jul 1991.
 
(1)	Date: 	Mon, 8 Jul 1991 12:49:00 -0400
	From: 	Ken Moyle <MOYLEK@MCMASTER>
	Subj:	Shakespeare in High Park (Toronto)
 
(2)	Date: 	Mon, 8 Jul 1991 14:45:31 -0400
	From: 	Larry Schwartz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	[*MV* & Censorship]
 
(1)--------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: 		Mon, 8 Jul 1991 12:49:00 -0400
From: 		Ken Moyle <MOYLEK@MCMASTER>
Subject: 	Shakespeare in High Park (Toronto)
 
        What do locals (ie. those from Southern Ontario in and about
T.O.) know about the free outdoor Shakespeare productions put on at
High Park?  Even if the plays come off only half-assed, it might be
worth an summer evening picnicing in a park, no?
 
				                        .....Jose
 
	[So far as I know, "The Dream in High Park" began playing
	*AYLI* on or about July 4th this year.  I have seen their outdoor
	*CE*, and the outdoor *Tempest* at Earl Bales Park, but have
	not had the chance to see this year's production.  Anyone else
	who has? -- k.s. ]
 
(2)--------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: 		Mon, 8 Jul 1991 14:45:31 -0400
From: 		Larry Schwartz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:      	[*MV* & Censorship]
 
Ken, I just wanted to alert you to an article in a library-land journal,
_Reference Services Review_ (Fall 1991, pp.55-69) entitled "Case
Studies in Censorship:  Censoring _The Merchant of Venice_" by
Richard A. Gray, senior editor at Pierian Press.  The article is in 3
parts:  A History of Twentieth-Century Censorship; Annotated
Bibliography; and Interpretation.  The final part considers the
questions, "1) does the play defame Jews, as charged? 2) Does the
play have a theme that transcends the issue of anti- and philo-
Semitism? 3) Assuming that the charge of defamation is valid, is it
then justifiable to suppress the play?"
 
It's an interesting article, I think, and approaches WS from yet another
angle.  I'd be interested in the opinions of the other SHAKSPEReans.
 
yours, &c
larry schwartz, theatre/film librarian, southern meth u, dallas, texas

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