1991

Responses: Lone Women, The Atlantic

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 243. Monday, 30 Sep 1991.
 
 
(1)	Date: 	Sat, 28 Sep 91 15:50:36 PDT
	From: 	Kay Stockholder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	Cressida, for Lars Engle.
 
(2)	Date: 	Mon, 30 Sep 1991 11:00:31 -0400
	From: 	Lorin Wertheimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj:   Women alone on stage
 
(3)	Date: 	Mon, 30 Sep 1991 09:12:01 -0400
	From: 	Richard Feinman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj:   Re: SHK 2.0241  N&Q: Oxford [and the Atlantic]
 
 
(1)--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Sat, 28 Sep 91 15:50:36 PDT
From: 		Kay Stockholder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Cressida, for Lars Engle.
 
Lady Macbeth appears with no other women.  What significance are you
attaching to the women figures who appear with no other women?
 
				Yours, Kay
 
(2)--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Mon, 30 Sep 1991 11:00:31 -0400
From: 		Lorin Wertheimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:      	Women alone on stage
 
In regard to women who never find other females in Shakespeare:
 
I believe Lady Macbeth never sees another woman, nor does Lady Macduff.
In Antony and Cleopatra, Octavia is without a female counterpart, unless you
count ladies in waiting.  You can check King Richard II to see if the queen,
Richard's wife, ever sees another woman.  In Richard III, there are minor
female characters, I think, who do not see any other females, but I remember
this from a strange production and it may not be textually supported.
In 1HIV the tavern woman doesn't meet anyone, though she does talk to Doll
Tearsheet in 2HIV, and is alone again in 1HV.  The wives in Julius Caesar
have but a scene apiece, I think, and therefore see no one but their hubbys.
It is very possible that the queen in King John sees no women, but this is
a long shot--it has been a long time.  In Othello, if Cassio's girlfriend is
not in the final act, I think she never meets other women.  hope this helps.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Mon, 30 Sep 1991 09:12:01 -0400
From: 		Richard Feinman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 2.0241  N&Q: Oxford [and the Atlantic]
Comment:      	Re: SHK 2.0241  N&Q: Oxford [and the Atlantic]
 
In reply to Lee Jacobus, the Atlantic is much worse on scientific issues, much
more give to "the establishment is hiding the truth from you," and "researchers
in the know, say that'" on scientific issues than in the arts.  It is actually
not a major magazine.  It once was and we tolerate it as we tolerate the aging
professor who tries to dress like a rock star.  We will be sad when it folds.

New on the Fileserver; SHAKSPER Member Profile

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 242. Sunday, 29 Sep 1991.
 
From: 		Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	New on the SHAKSPER Fileserver
Date: 		Sun, 29 Sep 91 0:05:54 EDT
 
 
Two announcements regarding the SHAKSPER Fileserver, and some
interesting statistics regarding SHAKSPEReans:
 
1)	Hardy Cook has sent me the first seventy of Shakespeare's
	*Sonnets*, and they have now been posted to the SHAKSPER
	Fileserver as SONNETS 1609Q.  Many thanks again for his
	generosity in making this text file available!
	
2)	I have updated the SHAKSPER Discussion Index for the first time
	since March.  It is a handy listing of subject lines for
	the past 377 digests on SHAKSPER, and can be retrieved as
	DISCUSS INDEX on the SHAKSPER Fileserver.
 
3)	No-one ever wants to be reduced to a statistic or slotted into
	a category, so my apologies if I am causing anyone offense here,
	but in reviewing the member biographies I've constructed the
	following cross-section of the SHAKSPER membership, and I
	think it's revealing:
	
		89 Professors of English
			(61 specializing in Shakespeare or Renaissance)
		18 Professors from other areas
			(largely Theatre, Music, Classics, History,
			but also Psychology, Sociology, Communications,
			Law, Statistics, Medicine, Math, Biochemistry...)
		34 Graduate Students
			(19 in English, usually Shakespeare or Renaissance)
		20 Undergraduate Students
		17 Humanities Computing folk
		13 Librarians
		18 Others
			(Computer Corporations, Planetaria, Oceanographers,
			University Administrators, Journalists, etc.)
 
	Also, in categories overlapping those above, SHAKSPER involves
	10 actors, 10 directors or producers, and 4 playwrights (and
	those of you who didn't admit it in your biographies aren't
	counted here).
 
	You may notice that the numbers add up to slightly more than
	our current membership total -- there has been some slight
	attrition over the past 14 months, and the biography files
	remain unchanged.	
 
	The totals tell us that Professors make up 56% of the group,
	Graduate Students a further 18%, and figures I haven't quoted
	here indicate that 82% of our members are in the USA.  Now I,
	for one, can stop guessing about the composition of our
	colloquium!
 
						Ken Steele
						University of Toronto

Query: Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 237. Tuesday, 24 Sep 1991.
 
Date: 		Mon, 23 Sep 1991 12:50:00 -0400
From: 		Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:  	Shakespeare's unstaged scenes
 
Ken,
        I want to respond to something I noticed in your review of the
production of *Much Ado* at the Stratford, Ontario Festival.  You mentioned
that this production included a dumbshow balcony scene before Claudio declares
his intention to shame Hero, an interpolation which provides justification for
Claudio's actions despite the fact that the text deliberately fails to provide
such motivation.  My forthcoming article in *Comparative Drama*, "The Editorial
Recuperation of Claudio," deals with theatrical and editorial strategies that
have been used in the past to make Claudio "look better," and the article in-
cludes a long section on the history of this interpolated dumbshow, which dates
back to the nineteenth century.  I was unaware, however, that "the inclusion of
this scene in dumb-show is a Stratford Festival tradition," and I would greatly
appreciate any additional recollections you or anyone else might have of the
details of such an interpolation.  The information would be too late to be in-
cluded in the Claudio article, but I'm currently working on a similar project
having to do with Bertram from *All's Well* and the unstageable quality of bed
trick scenes.  I have actually run across an account of a production which did
include a dumbshow symbolic version of the bed trick, but I'm wondering if
anyone else out there might remember another production in which the bed trick
itself was "staged."  Also, I'd appreciate any thoughts on why productions
might want to stage Shakespeare's unstaged scenes in the first place.
 
                                                Thanks,
 
                                                Michael Friedman
                                                friedman@scranton
 
	[I've been holding on to this note for too long, hoping to
	have time to dig through my notes and answer it properly.  At
	the moment, that look slike it may still take a while, so I'm
	posting Michael's request to the group in the hope that it may
	start some discussion and that he may get answers from others.
	-- k.s.]

N&Q: Oxford, Cressida, Chimes, Bevington on Disk

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 241. Saturday, 28 Sep 1991.
 
 
(1)	Date:   Thu, 26 Sep 91 11:37:39 EST
	From: 	"Lee A. Jacobus  UConn" <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 2.0229  The Earl of Oxford vs William Shakespeare
 
(2)	Date:   Fri, 27 Sep 1991 10:31:56 CDT
	From: 	Lars Engle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	Re: Cressida
 
(3)	Date: 	Fri, 27 Sep 91 14:22:03 CDT
	From: 	Richard A. Gale <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	Chimes @ 12:00
 
(4)	Date: 	Thu, 26 Sep 1991 14:42:00 -0400
	From: 	John Dorenkamp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj:	[Bevington Shakespeare on Disk?]
 
	
(1)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date:         	Thu, 26 Sep 91 11:37:39 EST
From: 		"Lee A. Jacobus  UConn" <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 2.0229  The Earl of Oxford vs William Shakespeare
Comment:      	Re: SHK 2.0229  The Earl of Oxford vs William Shakespeare
 
I have read most of the article in ATLANTIC and find myself very annoyed at
the way in which the author(s) make use of arguments--flimsy arguments--
on both sides of the issue.  When it is to the advantage of their contention
favoring Oxford they make insufficient evidence seem sufficient; they do
exactly the reverse when reviewing evidence that might favor WS (such as the
sad fact that Oxford died in 1604).  Perhaps most silly is their denoting
the author of the plays as Shakespear, while referring to William Shakespeare
as "the man from Stratford."  Why is this stuff in a major magazine?
 
(2)-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date:    	Fri, 27 Sep 1991 10:31:56 CDT
From: 		Lars Engle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Re: Cressida
 
	Question: can anyone think of a major female character in
Shakespeare besides Cressida and Miranda who never speaks or shares
the stage with another female?
 
(3)-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Fri, 27 Sep 91 14:22:03 CDT
From: 		Richard A. Gale <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Chimes @ 12:00
	
	[Richard A. Gale forwards the following information from
	Cinema-L, the Bitnet Discussion group.  For more information,
	see the file NETWORK LISTS SHAKSPER on the SHAKSPER Fileserver.
	-- k.s.]
 
Begin forwarded message:
 
	Date:         	Tue, 24 Sep 1991 10:19:00 EDT
	From: 		SYRACURG%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
	Subject:      	RE: Chimes @ 12:00
 
     	There are several video copies of Chimes at Midnight around.
	Some are:
 
            Balzac Video             1987
            Facets Multimedia        1989
 
      	Not sure if the following info pertains to the video company,
   	or the original motion pic:
 
            Arthur Cantor Prod.      1987
            NOW Playing              1967
 
      	Does this help?
 
 
(4)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Thu, 26 Sep 1991 14:42:00 -0400
From: 		John Dorenkamp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:	[Bevington Shakespeare on Disk?]
 
I just talked to a sales rep from McGraw-Hill who are
bringing out the Bevington Shakespeare in a couple of
months.
 
They list an 18 disc "Shakespeare on Disc" (IBM and Mac
compatible) as a supplement to the book.  The sales rep had
no specific info about it.
 
Has anyone heard of it?  Will it be the Bevington text? Is
there an additional cost? Or will it be supplied upon
adoption of the text for a course?

Sample Files on the SHAKSPER Fileserver

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 236. Tuesday, 24 Sep 1991.
 
From: 		Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Sample Files on the SHAKSPER Fileserver
Date: 		Tue, 24 Sep 91 10:30:30 EDT
 
Dear Fellow SHAKSPEReans;
 
I am pleased to announce the creation of a new area on the SHAKSPER
Fileserver, containing over thirty files of information and samples from
the Oxford Text Archive.  Lou Burnard has kindly provided excerpts
from the Quarto files currently available from the Archive, so that
SHAKSPEReans can experiment with them and examine the tagging schemes
of each.  (The excerpts consist of the first 60 lines, middle 60
lines, and last 60 lines of each text, along with summary and tagging
information).  Those of you who have never played with parallel texts
might try looking at the alternate quartos of *Romeo and Juliet* or
*Hamlet* for a start -- it's too bad we don't have Folio texts to
compare as well.
 
The files are as follows:
 
 
* Oxford Text Archive Information and Sample Texts:
  OXFORD   ARCHIVE    The Current OTA Shortlist - Edited for SHAKSPEReans
  OXFORD   BROCHURE   Ordering Information
  SHAKSPER TEXTLIST   Lou Burnard's Recent list, including sources
  SPECIAL  OFFER      Lou Burnard's recent offer for $90
*
* Sample Quarto Comedies:
  LLLQ1    SAMPLE     Love's Labour's Lost Q1 - 1598
  MAANQ1   SAMPLE     Much Ado About Nothing Q1 - 1600
  MSNDQ1   SAMPLE     A Midsummer Night's Dream Q1 - 1600
  MVQ1     SAMPLE     The Merchant of Venice Q1 - 1600
  MWWQ1    SAMPLE     The Merry Wives of Windsor Q1 - 1602
*
* Sample Quarto Histories:
  CONTENTN SAMPLE     The First Part of the Contention (2H6) Q1 - 1594
  1H4Q1    SAMPLE     Henry IV Part 1 Q1 - 1598
  2H4Q1    SAMPLE     Henry IV Part 2 Q1 - 1600
  EDWARD3  SAMPLE     Edward III
  H5Q1     SAMPLE     Henry V Q1 - 1600
  HENRY5Q1 SAMPLE     Henry V Q1 - 1600 (Different Tagging)
  R2Q1     SAMPLE     Richard II Q1 - 1597
  R3Q1     SAMPLE     Richard III Q1 - 1597
  TRUETRAG SAMPLE     The True Tragedy of Richard Duke of York (3H6) - 1595
*
* Sample Quarto Tragedies:
  HAMLETQ1 SAMPLE     Hamlet Q1 - 1603
  HAMLETQ2 SAMPLE     Hamlet Q2 - 1604
  KLQ1     SAMPLE     King Lear Q1 - 1608
  OTHQ1    SAMPLE     Othello Q1 - 1622
  RJQ1     SAMPLE     Romeo and Juliet Q1 - 1597
  RJQ2     SAMPLE     Romeo and Juliet Q2 - 1598
  TCQ1     SAMPLE     Troilus and Cressida Q1 - 1609
  TITUSQ1  SAMPLE     Titus Andronicus Q1 - 1594
*
* Sample Poems & Romances:
  2NKQ1    SAMPLE     The Two Noble Kinsmen Q1 - 1634
  PERICLES SAMPLE     Pericles Q1 - 1609
  POEMS    SAMPLE     Shakespeare's Poems
  SONNETS  SAMPLE     Shakespeare's Sonnets
  PILGRIM  SAMPLE     The Passionate Pilgrim
 
 
 
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