1991

NEH Seminar: Inventing the New World

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 281. Thursday, 31 Oct 1991.
 
 
Date: 		Thu, 31 Oct 1991 12:03:42 -0500
From: 		Steven Mullaney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:  	NEH Summer Seminar (1992)
 
Call For Applications:  Professor Steven Mullaney will be
directing a six-week NEH Summer Seminar for College Teachers
from July 6 to August 14, 1992 at the University of Michigan, Ann
Arbor.  For fuller information and application materials, please
WRITE to the address below.  Application materials are not yet
available but will be mailed as soon as received from NEH.  The
topic and description follow; please circulate to any interested
parties.
 
Inventing the New World:  Texts, Contexts, Approaches
 
The European encounter with the Americas is not a simple story of
discovery, conquest, and colonization.  Once discovered or
"invented" in the original sense of the word, the New World had
to be invented in the modern sense as well, made over and cast
into terms that rendered it accessible to and capable of European
imagination.  Sometimes accurately, oftentimes not, blending
rigorous and fairly objective observation with their own myths,
fears, and anxieties, sixteenth-century accounts of New World
voyages played an integral role in this complex process of
cultural accommodation, refashioning the New World in pictorial
representation and narrative form to produce a diverse, rich, and
ambivalent body of colonial discourse.
 
      This seminar will explore selected Spanish, French, and
English New World accounts, ranging from Columbus to Walter
Ralegh, Cortez to Martin Frobisher, Jean de Lery in Brazil to John
Smith in Virginia.  Throughout, we will be interested not only in
the ethnographic details of native lives and customs conveyed to
us--in  sorting out accurate renditions from distortions,
misperceptions, and fabrications--but also in what motivates,
explains, or is explained by the dynamics of European perception
and misperception: in an ethnography, that is to say, of the
colonizer as well as the colonized.  To this end, we will be
exploring and drawing upon recent, socio-historical trends in
literary studies, anthropology, and cultural history in order to
develop our own "thickly" contextualized cultural interpretations
of sixteenth-century colonial representation.  The seminar
welcomes applications from historians, anthropologists, art
historians, and teachers and scholars in the areas of literary and
cultural studies.
 
      National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminars are
intended primarily for individuals teaching undergraduate courses,
full- or part-time, at two- and four year colleges and
universities.  Individuals who are not college teachers but who
are qualified to carry out the work of the seminar are also
eligible to apply.  Participants receive a stipend of $3,200 to
cover travel expenses, books, and living expenses.  Applications
must be received by March 2, 1992.
 
For further information and application forms, please contact:
 
Professor Steven Mullaney, Director
C/O E. Karen Clark
Department of English Language and Literature
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Multimedia *Hamlet* from IBM

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 280. Thursday, 31 Oct 1991.
 
 
Date: 		Thu, 31 Oct 1991 09:29:00 -0500
From: 		Ann Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:  	Multimedia _Hamlet_
 
 
SHAKSPEReans,
 
I recently attended a CD-ROM conference in Washington, D.C. and
encountered a product which IBM will be issuing which I think
will be of some interest, especially given the ongoing interest in
e-text of Shakespeare.
 
The new series is called Illuminated Books and Manuscripts (TM) an
attempt to create multimedia learning tools for a personal workstation
(IBM of course).  The keynote address of the conference was used to
introduce it (very slick).  One of the first "books" available is
_Hamlet_.
 
What the multimedia approach does is allow video, text and audio to be
combined into one experience.  Many of you may already be using this
level of technology but for me, with my monochrome Hercules orange
screen and plodding 20 MB IBM clone, it was eye-popping!  Using a
mouse the operator can focus on various "tools" to help
interpretation.  These are: Define, Context, Interpret, Method, and
Link, though it looks as though there may be some unique ones for each
book.  These in turn bring up video of the time period, scholars
discussing interpretation of specific parts of text, the text itself,
interpretation over time and a bibliography.  The video chosen for
_Hamlet_ is the Olivier film (in the brochure it looks colorized)
which leads me to question just what they're going to do with all that
missing text!
 
I was unable to actually look at the program operating.  The example
used in the keynote address was Tennyson's "Ulysses" and "Letter from
a Brimingham Jail" by Martin Luther King, Jr.  IBM had a booth in the
exhibition hall but had hardware problems and this system wasn't up.
We needed to get out of D.C. before rush hour so I couldn't wait.  It
might be something which shows up at a CD show in your area.  I wasn't
quite sure when it was officially going to be on the market but I'll
bet IBM would tell you about it if you asked.
 
I'll reproduce the blurb from the brouchure I have plus the hardware
requirements.  This is where I have the most questions.  Who can
afford this??  Apparently the goal is to make these programs personal
resources but the hardware requirements seem to require institutional
investments.  I can see purchasing them for my library but not for me.
I never got a price quote (perhaps its not firm yet) though one of the
computer folks I went with mentioned $1600 per program.
Unsubstantiated rumour that.
 
The upshot is that I would still be interested in pursuing public
domain e-text of Shakespeare.  I'm willing to type and learn about all
these markup programs and protocols which I've never heard of. (The
recent discussion has been fascinating, but cryptic.)  Most students
and scholars can't afford these kind of texts from the commercial
realm.  If I could have them ftp into a site from my library and
download texts it would be ideal.  It would introduce students to the
idea of looking at texts electronically, help my professors save money
and my library space (and money!).
 
 
BROCHURE NOTES:
 
TAKE A LOOK AT SHAKESPEARE'S CLASSIC PLAY
 
     People tend to learn more and remember more when they are
     active participants in the learning process.  With the
     Illuminated Books and Manuscripts, you become involved and
     engrossed in the process of exploration and discovery.
 
     Participate in a production of Hamlet to study society of
     that time or to improve your speaking skills.  Review scenes
     performed by actors to *See* and *Hear* the gestures, the
     accents, and the emotions.
 
     The Illuminated Books and Manuscripts lets you examine the
     *Link* of psychology and human existence to the tragedy of
     Hamlet's revenge.  Master the *Tools of the Writer* that
     Shakespeare and others used to produce such dramatic
     effects.
 
     Have learners try those techniques on their own pieces and
     *Analyze* one of the other literary works provided with the
     Illuminated Books and Manuscripts.  Learners can research
     the work on their own, then attach definitions and
     contextual meanings, record their opinions, get other
     people's *Opinions*.  *Explore* the theme of the work, write
     an essay about it, and connect it to the work to create a
     new addition to the Illuminated Books and Manuscripts!
 
     _Hamlet, Prince of Denmark_ is one of Shakespeare's best
     known tragedies.  It illustrates the reasons why he is
     considered one of the world's greatest poets and plywrights.
     Uncover the roots of the play, how it was originally
     performed by the French in a different version than what we
     are familiar. (sic)
 
     Take a look at the actual play itself -- the main characters,
     the events, the places.  You can read a quick description of
     them and of the entire play or maybe only about a particular
     scene, without searching through the whole work.  Or better
     yet, see that scene performed for a clearer understanding of
     the emotions being described.
 
     Was Hamlet a hero ... for committing murder as revenge upon
     his father's killer?  Was he really insane?  Or was he just
     pretending?
 
     How many different versions of _Hamlet_ are available?  Are
     they all written in Elizabethan verse so thou has to seek
     interpretation?  Grasp the Shakespearean language by
     immediately requesting definitions of Elizabethan terms.
 
     See and hear how Shakespeare provides vivid, dramatic
     descriptions to paint a picture of the characters.  Apply
     those techniques to your own writings and create your own
     writing styles.
 
     Explore the major themes presented in _Hamlet_:  tragedy,
     psychology, human existence.  Examine psychological
     identities, relationships, and the intensity of the tragedies
     of revenge.
 
HARDWARE:
 
The Illuminated Books and Manuscripts is recommended for use with the
IBM Personal System/2 Model M57 SLC with 6 MB of memory and an 80 MB
hard disk drive.  The following components are also required:
 
--IBM VGA Monitor or Large Screen Computer DIsplay
--IBM PS/2 Mouse
--IBM SCSI Internal CD-ROM Drive
--Pioneer LD-V8000 LaserDisc Player
--M-Audio Capture/Playback Adapter Card
--Matrox Illuminator-16/Micro Channel Video Card
 
 
Ann Miller
Carrier Library
James Madison University
Harrisonburg, VA  22807
Bitnet: fac_amil@jmuvax
Internet:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Agronomics: Long Purples, etc.

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 278. Wednesday, 30 Oct 1991.
 
 
Date: 		Wed, 30 Oct 1991 17:37:28 -0500
From: 		Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Agronomics: "long purples"
 
 
     My University's garden club is undertaking a Shakespearean
     Garden, hoping to grow a variety of plants and flowers
     mentioned in the plays.
 
     Can anyone direct me to practical information--such as
     current sources for seeds and bulbs of the less common
     flora?

Public Domain Project

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 279. Thursday, 31 Oct 1991.
 
 
(1)	Date: 	Thu, 31 Oct 1991 00:15:37 -0500
	From: 	This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Liam R. E. Quin)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 2.0277  Public Domain Projects
 
(2)	Date: 	Thu, 31 Oct 1991 11:03:36 -0500
	From: 	Keith Braithwaite <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 2.0277  Public Domain Projects
 
(3)	Date: 	Thu, 31 Oct 1991 09:29:00 -0500
	From: 	Ann Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj:  	[Public Domain Texts]
 
 
(1)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Thu, 31 Oct 1991 00:15:37 -0500
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Liam R. E. Quin)
Subject: 2.0277  Public Domain Projects
Comment: 	Re: SHK 2.0277  Public Domain Projects
 
I'd still be interested in PD shakespeare -- commercial outfits can't
really use the Oxford Text Archives...  e.g. an SGML Macbeth would be good
for sale demonstrations here, I suspect...
 
I have the Yale facsimile, & could do a certain amount of typing.
 
Lee
--
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  Liam Quin  The barefoot programmer
 
(2)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Thu, 31 Oct 1991 11:03:36 -0500
From: 		Keith Braithwaite <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 2.0277  Public Domain Projects
Comment: 	RE: SHK 2.0277  Public Domain Projects
 
Hello Ken et al...
 
I've been watching [reading 8-)...] all the postings and although I haven't had
time to join in the discussion, I would like to express an interest
 
i)      in joining in the "bulk buy" of the Oxford Archive texts, and
 
ii)     in helping the typing/scanning work you're putting together.
 
Being lazy [in some respects, not others...] I prefer to be *told* what to do
in these instances - then I just get on with it. My whole life otherwise is
spent organising other people, so I never have time to organise myself. Within
obvious limits, just say "do this" and I'll get on with it.
 
I have a slight problem for the archive texts - I don't know yet under which
hat I want them - how soon do you need to know?
 
	[Ed. note: the Oxford Text Archive special offer was made to
	members of SHAKSPER, and details are contained in the file
	SPECIAL OFFER SHAKSPER on the Fileserver in the OTA area.
	The offer is a "bulk buy" in the sense that multiple texts are
	available in a single package, but I did not mean to imply
	that they will be purchased as a group -- the file contains an
	order form which each member must mail to Oxford, signed, with
	appropriate payment (bank draft or cheque in pounds sterling
	or US dollars).  -- k.s.]
 
My own colleagues have shown total disdain [and fear] of electronic
Shakespeare, "another of Braithwaite's madcap computer schemes..." but I also
have the job of running the major electronic teaching resources centre [part of
the CRDP - Centre Regional de Documentation Pedagogique, which includes much
more than computer stuff of course] in Montpellier (that's Montpellier with two
LL's about 100 miles north of Perpignan where I teach at the Univ.
 
In my part of the centre, where the *centre* of attraction is the pedagogical
use of Email, I hope to set up an electronic SHAKSPER corner (strange
twitching images of the Bard spring to my fevered mind) where I hope to recruit
future subscribers to SHAKSPER - potential contributors to mass archive
constitution groups - and all the other benefits of your institution...
 
	[Ed. note: Sorry to interrupt again, but I thought it
	important to mention that there are some official SHAKSPER
	handouts, which can be customized for particular purposes,
	which I could make available for such displays.  Anyone
	planning to promote SHAKSPER just has to drop me a line.  -- k.s.]
 
I will have the necessary funding for machines, modem or other links etc at the
end of the year. I'll keep you posted.
 
Regards
Keith
 
Keith Braithwaite                   |      Email:  BRAITH@FRPERP51
I.U.F.M (Technologies Nouvelles)    |
University of Perpignan             |              ENGLISH@FRPERP51
Avenue Dr Alexis Carrel             |
66860  PERPIGNAN                    |
France                              |      FAX:    68 66 20 19
 
(3)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Thu, 31 Oct 1991 09:29:00 -0500
From: 		Ann Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:  	[Public Domain Texts]
 
	[Ed. Note: I have reproduced this paragraph from Ann Miller's
	note on the IBM Multimedia Hamlet, which appears as a separate
	digest today, because it is relevant to this discussion as well.
	-- k.s.]
 
The upshot is that I would still be interested in pursuing public
domain e-text of Shakespeare.  I'm willing to type and learn about all
these markup programs and protocols which I've never heard of. (The
recent discussion has been fascinating, but cryptic.)  Most students
and scholars can't afford these kind of texts from the commercial
realm.  If I could have them ftp into a site from my library and
download texts it would be ideal.  It would introduce students to the
idea of looking at texts electronically, help my professors save money
and my library space (and money!).

Public Domain Projects

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 277. Wednesday, 30 Oct 1991.
 
 
From: 		Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Public Domain Projects
Date: 		Wed, 30 Oct 91 17:48:59 EST
 
 
Dear Fellow SHAKSPEReans;
 
So far, more than a dozen of us have ordered the Oxford Text Archive
versions of the Shakespeare quarto and folio texts, thanks to Lou
Burnard's timely and generous package deal.  (Others have indicated an
intention to place their orders soon.)  Obviously, this fact
will have some bearing on our recent discussion of a possible
cooperative public domain project (the most active discussion yet held
on SHAKSPER, I might add).
 
The question begs to be put, so I put it:  How many remain interested
in keyboarding, scanning, editing, or collating original electronic
texts to be placed in the public domain?  Would you be more interested
in preparing texts of a modern edition, the original quartos and
folios, Shakespearean sources, or Shakespearean contemporaries?
Or does everyone now have affordable access to everything they wanted?
 
Our time and effort might best be spent on texts which are not yet
available through the Archive: derivative Folios, for example, or
dramatic documents like *Sir Thomas More*, or some of the sources in
Geoffrey Bullough's *Narrative & Dramatic Sources of Shakespeare* (not
from that edition, which is copyrighted, but from originals perhaps).
Elizabethan poetry or drama might also be of general interest and usefulness.
 
I invite comments and suggestions from interested members.  In the
meantime, I continue to assemble available texts in the Public Domain
Texts area of the SHAKSPER Fileserver.  Thus far, special thanks are
due to Tom Horton and Hardy Cook, for their PD texts of the Cornmarket
*Comedy of Errors*, *Henry VIII*, and the *Sonnets*.  Any members with
other PD texts which might be of interest to SHAKSPEReans, or who are
aware of PD texts elsewhere which might be added to this area, please
let me know.
 
						Yours,
 
						Ken Steele
						University of Toronto

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