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Home :: Archive :: 1991 :: October ::
Authorship Controversy & "Spinoff"
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 250. Thursday, 10 Oct 1991.
 
 
(1)	Date: 	Fri, 4 Oct 1991 10:22:00 -0400
	From: 	David Bank <
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	Subj: 	Re: SHK 2.0248  Authorship Controversy
 
(2)	Date:   Sun, 6 Oct 1991 16:32:49 -0400 (EDT)
	From: 	David Richman <
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	Subj: 	Authorship Controversy Spinoff
 
(3)	Date: 	Wed, 9 Oct 91 09:51:38 PDT
	From: 	Kay Stockholder <
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	Subj: 	SHK 2.0248  Authorship Controversy
 
 
(1)--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Fri, 4 Oct 1991 10:22:00 -0400
From: 		
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Subject: 2.0248  Authorship Controversy
Comment: 	Re: SHK 2.0248  Authorship Controversy
 
Surely there's all sorts of evidence - in the plays themselves -
ruling out the likelihood of aristocratic authorship; all the idealizations
of noble birth, for example. These seem the commonplaces of an outsider
looking in, as it were; not the other way about. "Shakespeare" seems
part of a large, rather amorphous, "aspirant" class in the late 16th century;
I can't think that any aristocrat would have defended the true nobility
of Edgar against the "false" of Edmund in quite the way "Shakespeare"
does in KL. Wouldn't consideration of authorship along such lines give us
a debate yielding *insights*?
                                David Bank
                                University of Glasgow, Scotland
 
(2)-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date:    	Sun, 6 Oct 1991 16:32:49 -0400 (EDT)
From: 		
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Subject: 	Authorship Controversy Spinoff
 
     The comments in recent days about the authorship controversy (among
the most rational and balanced I have read on this issue usually tainted
by fanaticism) reminded me of an interesting Shakespearean spinoff that
spins, to a certain extent, on this question.  I don't recall this
spinoff being mentioned in previous SHAKSPER discussions.
 
     Charles Ludlum, who died too young a few years ago, wrote
outrageous comedies on all sorts of subjects--country music, Camille,
Gothic horror, the third genital.  I would argue that he was one of the
best, if not the best, of contemporary American (US?) playwrights.
*Stage Blood*, 1974, describes a down-at-heels theatrical company
playing *Hamlet* in the unknown town of Mudville.  (Little joy.)
Carlton Stone, the leading actor and a one-time great, is too worn out
with various dissipations to play the great Dane.  He is relegated to
the ghost--"I am the ghost of my former self,"--and his no-account,
irreverent son, Carl Junior, must play the Prince.  "To be or not to be,
. . . line?" Things take a bloody turn when Stone Senior is murdered,
and Stone Junior finds that Mamma, the company's grande dame, who of
course is having an affair with the actor playing Claudius, is
implicated with that actor in the murder.  In any case, the authorship
of the plays is hotly debated, and one character has what I believe to
be the last word on the subject.  Videlicet:  "The plays of Shakespeare
were not written by Shakespeare, but by another playwright of the same
name."
 
     Ludlum composed, as did Shakespeare, for audiences rather than
readers.  I don't know whether *Stage Blood* has been published yet.
His plays have been finding print slowly in the years since his death.
If you call the Drama Bookshop in New York (don't recall the phone
number or address) they can tell you what of his is now in print.
 
David Richman
University of New Hampshire
 
(3)--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Wed, 9 Oct 91 09:51:38 PDT
From: 		Kay Stockholder <
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Subject: Authorship Controversy
Comment: 	SHK 2.0248  Authorship Controversy
 
Who says there is a strong connection between the psychological profile
of Shakespeare's protagonists and Edward de Vere? Do Hamlet and
Coriolanus have the same psychological profile?
 
					Kay Stockholder
 

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