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Home :: Archive :: 1991 :: October ::
Public Domain Shakespeare; Sonnets on the Internet
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 255. Thursday, 10 Oct 1991.
 
 
(1)	Date:   Sun, 6 Oct 1991 16:31:49 -0400 (EDT)
	From: 	David Richman <
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	Subj: 	Public Domain Shakespeare Redux
 
(2)	Date: 	Tue, 8 Oct 1991 13:51:00 -0400
	From: 	Peter Scott <
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	Subj: 	Shakespeare's sonnets on WAIS
 
 
(1)-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date:    	Sun, 6 Oct 1991 16:31:49 -0400 (EDT)
From: 		David Richman <
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Subject: 	Public Domain Shakespeare Redux
 
     I have been away from my computer for several weeks.  When I
returned, I found the entire SHAKSPER correspondence of September
waiting for me.  This is SHAKSPER's most exciting month since I joined,
and I am glad to have enjoyed the entire discussion of the public domain
project--from Steve Urkowitz's initial query (lament? belch?) to Lou
Burnard's astonishing offer--as one uninterrupted feast.  When the
history of computing in the humanities during the last decade of the
twentieth century is written, this discussion deserves a chapter, since
it embraces so many of our collective concerns.
 
     I suppose it remains to be seen whether the Oxford Text Archive
complete Q and F texts for $90 will render obsolete the idea of a
SHAKSPER-generated public domain project.  If such a project still seems
good, or if we decide to make other dramatic texts available, count me
in as a typist.  I would love to contribute a scene or two.
 
     Whether or not we go forward with such a project, I think the
discussion has already generated a great deal of useful information
about why many of us use electronic texts.  I have one significant use
for such texts that has not yet been mentioned in the discussion, so I
take the liberty of adding it here.  Naturally, I would use these texts
as the primary sources for my productions of Shakespeare.  Having ready
access, via computer, to authoritative texts would save much labor and
time in preparing scripts for production.  Naturally, I also use such
texts for teaching:  preparing parallel passages for students.  Of great
personal importance is the fact that computer technology gives me, a
blind individual, as it gives to many other disabled individuals, a
measure of independence we could scarcely imagine even a decade ago.  I
will not cease to employ human readers, but these texts, in
machine-readable form, will liberate my readers and me from many tedious
hours of dictating and copying.  The computer's speech synthesizer can
read me the plays, I can print out passages in Braille for personal use,
or passages in print for the use of students, colleagues, theater
artists, or other persons with whom I work and play.  For my purposes,
the less coding or mark-up, the better.  I must convert everything to my
own specialized word processor, stripping away all extraneous markings.
Straight ASCII text sends me into ecstasies, and my joy diminishes with
each { } < or >.
 
     Indeed, access by means of talking computer to SHAKSPER and other
online services affords me, as well as other disabled users, yet another
measure of independence.  We all yearn for the electronic library.  I
cannot too strongly express my gratitude to SHAKSPER, and to Ken Steele.
 
     We all have many reasons to be grateful to Ken.  Surely, his
thoughtful letter to Mr. Burnard had something to do with the Oxford
Text Archive offer.
 
Cheers.
 
David Richman
 
University of New Hampshire
 
(2)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Tue, 8 Oct 1991 13:51:00 -0400
From: 		Peter Scott <
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Subject: 	Shakespeare's sonnets on WAIS
 
You might like to try the WAIS at think.com.  There is a "poetry" file
which can be searched by keyword(s). Among other things listed are the
Sonnets.
 
To access the WAIS:
telnet to quake.think.com  (or 192.31.181.1)
login as wais
choose vt100 as the terminal type.
 
You will be presented with a list of source files. Arrow down to
"poetry" or choose source number 56. The sources numbers may change as
new files are added.
 
Hit the space bar to select the source. Hit w to select keyword(s). A
list of files containing the keyword(s) is presented. Arrow down to the
file of interest, then hit the space bar.
 
Here's a search I did on the word "shakespeare":
 
Keywords: shakespeare
 
Searching: poetry
Found 40 items.
SWAIS                            Search Results                       Items: 40
 
  #   Score      Source                       Title                       Lines
 01: [1000] (         POETRY)  Commendatory_Poems_and_Prefaces   /tmp_mnt   660
 02: [ 268] (         POETRY)  Epitaphs   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poetr    92
 03: [ 239] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-Alternative_Versions   /tmp_mnt/net   159
 04: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-1   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poetr    21
 05: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-10   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poet    21
 06: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-100   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    21
 07: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-101   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    21
 08: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-102   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    22
 09: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-103   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    21
 10: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-104   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    21
 11: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-105   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    21
 12: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-106   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    21
 13: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-107   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    21
 14: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-108   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    21
 15: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-109   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    21
 16: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-11   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poet    22
 17: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-110   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    22
 18: [ 224] (         POETRY)  Sonnet-111   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poe    21
 
Retrieving: Sonnet-1   /tmp_mnt/net/library-disk/Poetry/Shakespeare/Sonnets/
 
Sonnets
______________________________
 
                        1
 
         From fairest creatures we desire increase,
         That thereby beauty's rose might never die,
         But as the riper should by time decease,
         His tender heir might bear his memory;
         But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes,           5
         Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel,
         Making a famine where abundance lies,
         Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel.
         Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament
         And only herald to the gaudy spring                     10
         Within thine own bud buriest thy content,
         And, tender churl, mak'st waste in niggarding.
                 Pity the world, or else this glutton be:
                 To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee.
 
(END)
 
........................................
 
I would suggest reading the help function before performing a search, as
it takes a bit of getting used to.
 
Peter Scott

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