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Home :: Archive :: 1991 :: October ::
Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 257. Monday, 14 Oct 1991.
 
 
(1)	Date: 	Sat, 12 Oct 91 19:35:42 PDT
	From: 	
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	Subj: 	SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
(2)	Date: 	Sat, 12 Oct 1991 23:52:16 -0400
	From: 	Steve Urkowitz <surcc@cunyvm.bitnet>
	Subj:   Re: SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
(3)	Date: 	Sun, 13 Oct 91 11:43:54 PDT
	From: 	
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	Subj: 	SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
 
(1)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Sat, 12 Oct 91 19:35:42 PDT
From: 		
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Subject: Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
Comment: 	SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
Who would be motivated to kill the porter of Inverness castle?
 
 
(2)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Sat, 12 Oct 1991 23:52:16 -0400
From: 		Steve Urkowitz <surcc@cunyvm.bitnet>
Subject: 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
Comment:      	Re: SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
ON THE UNSTAGED SCENE CONVERSATION:
 
Though this might be an odd tangent, I was led to think about unexpected
effects of running the beginning of one scene smack onto the ending of
the scene before.  When working with composer Paul Kozel setting up
music and sound effects for OTHELLO last semester, my wife (Susan
Spector of Baruch College) and I began tinkering with the storm that
begins Act II.  Paul brewed up wind on his computer, and then he
suggested some thunder followed by alarum bells to rattle that Cyprus
fortress.  As we talked someone suggested some preliminary storm
warnings during Iago's last speech.  IN the event, we had   "  . . . And
will as tenderly be led by the nose / As asses are."   DISTANT WARNING,
THREATENING RUMBLE  ""I have't. It is engender'd."  Rumble Rumble.
"Hell and night" CRACK "must bring this monstrous birth" --CRACK-- "to
the world's light" KaBOOM CRASH WIND (blow the fuses on the speakers)
THUNDERBOOM.  Iago learned the timing of the two warning CRACKs so he
could bring on the storm with his imaginings.  He would leap into the
air and hurl his arms to pull down the sound.  The next entry
of Montano and his buddies has to fight through the same storm, now
blown 1200 miles to the east . . . Ah, cheap theatrics!  Just like that
gaudy KING LEAR 2.4-3.1 transition.
 
      As a general matter, I wonder how other directors use those
potentialities as actors from one scene reform the imaginative space of
the scene before or after theirs.
 
             Yours ever,
 
	        Steve Urkowitz (SURCC@CUNYVM)
 
 
(3)--------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Sun, 13 Oct 91 11:43:54 PDT
From: 		
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
Subject: Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
Comment: 	SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
I think the trouble with substituting visual for narrated scenes
is that doing so takes the emphasis off language. It is true
that modern audiences are more accustomed to having their
visualization done for them, rather than allowing the
language to work inside their heads, and sometimes I guess
it makes sense to accommodate that.  But part of the power
of art is to educate its audience, or reader, in the
appropriate mode of perception, and if one tampers too
much with the original balance of vision to words, one
deprives the play of its educative power in this mode.
 
Kay Stockholder
 

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