1991

HUMBUL: Humanities Bulletin Board

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 260. Wednesday, 16 Oct 1991.
 
 
Date: 		Wed, 16 Oct 1991 05:02:00 -0400
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject:  	The Humanities Bulletin Board (HUMBUL)
 
Dear All,
 
The majority of you are probably well aware of the existence of HUMBUL
(The HUManities BULletin Board), which used to reside at Leicester University,
but has recently moved to Oxford University Computing Services. For those of
you, however, who are not familiar with the service I am releasing the
following introductory paragraphs, plus details of the new logging on
procedures.
 
HUMBUL is a long-running service aimed at providing academics and interested
parties with news and information on Humanities Computing. The service is an
on-line bulletin board, subdivided into numerous sections, for which
subscription is free. Information is collected from all the applicable
electronic networks, plus periodicals, leaflets, and also direct requests to
the editor.
 
Interaction with the board itself is fairly easy and new users should read
about HUMBUL under section A. To facilitate using some of the longer sections
there is a Search facility inherent in the program. Users can send mail
directly to the editor via the command MAIL or ask for specific sections to be
sent to them via POST. At regular intervals Section S (the Stop Press) will be
forwarded on to all users to remind them of the most recent additions.
 
Should you require any further help then please contact me as indicated in the
section below,
 
Stuart Lee
HUMBUL Editor
CTI Centre for Textual Studies and the Office for Humanities Communication,
Oxford University Computing Services
 
 
                     HOW TO ACCESS HUMBUL
                     --------------------
 
 THE HUMBUL NETWORK ADDRESS...................... page 2
 DIAL-UP LINE (PSTN) ............................ page 3
 TELEPHONE ...................................... page 3
 TERMINAL ACCESS TO HUMBUL FROM OUTSIDE JANET ... page 4
 HOW TO DOWNLOAD HUMBUL FILES ................... page 6
 LISTSERV DISTRIBUTION LIST ..................... page 8
 
 
 
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Fileserver Procedures:
 
SHAKSPEReans can retrieve the complete text file from the SHAKSPER
Fileserver by issuing the interactive command, "TELL LISTSERV
AT UTORONTO GET HUMBUL ANNOUNCE SHAKSPER".  If your network link does
not support the interactive "TELL" command, or if Listserv rejects
your request, then send a one-line mail message (without a subject
line) to LISTSERV@utoronto, reading "GET HUMBUL ANNOUNCE SHAKSPER".
 
For a complete list of files available, send the command "GET
SHAKSPER FILES SHAKSPER" to obtain an annotated index.
 
For further information, consult the appropriate section of your
SHAKSPER GUIDE, or contact the editor, <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> or
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

Literary Network Conferences

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 259. Wednesday, 16 Oct 1991.
 
 
(1)	Date:   Tue, 15 Oct 1991 10:50:50 -0500 (CDT)
	From: 	James L. Harner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	Electronic Bulletin Boards or Special Interest Groups
 
(2)	From: 	Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	Literary Network Discussion Groups
	Date: 	Wed, 16 Oct 91 9:04:35 EDT
 
	
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date:    	Tue, 15 Oct 1991 10:50:50 -0500 (CDT)
From: 		James L. Harner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Electronic Bulletin Boards or Special Interest Groups
 
Does anyone know of a convenient list of Special Interest Groups or
Electronic Bulletin Boards devoted to literary topics/authors?
 
					Jim Harner
 
(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Literary Network Discussion Groups
Date: 		Wed, 16 Oct 91 9:04:35 EDT
 
There are a number of useful guides to network discussion groups of
varying exhaustiveness and convenience.  The most exhaustive, and
hence least convenient, is the Global list available directly from any
backbone Listserv site.  Send the command "LIST GLOBAL" to
<Listserv@utoronto> (for example), and you'll receive a list of
several thousand Listserv discussion groups ranging from morris
dancing to yachting.
 
Diane Kovacs has prepared a series of carefully-indexed files confined
to academic topics, available as ACADLIST FILE1, ACADLIST FILE2,
ACADLIST FILE3, ACADLIST README, and ACADLIST INDEX from the ARACHNET
Fileserver, and also I believe available as ACADEMIC LIST1 and
ACADEMIC LIST2 on the HUMANIST Fileserver.  The subjects covered range
from engineering and biology to literature, but the descriptions are
sometimes unhelpful (the SHAKSPER one is a case in point).  Considerably
less exhaustive but more convenient are the files BITNET LISTS on the
HUMANIST Fileserver, and LISTSERV GROUPS on the FICINO Fileserver.
 
MOST convenient AND exhaustive, however, for the purposes of most
SHAKSPEReans, is the file announced in SHK 2.0227 last month: the
SHAKSPER List of Bitnet Discussion Groups.  I have culled this index
from all of the above sources, and sorted them into three categories:
Medieval & Renaissance topics, Theatre and Film topics, and Literary
Topics.  A final section offers general information on Listserv
procedures such as subscribing, unsubscribing, and altering your
membership settings.  This listing is as exhaustive as I could make
it, including Internet UNIX Newsgroups as well as Bitnet ListServs
where relevant.
 
If anyone out there is aware of other useful lists, or has suggestions
or additions to make to this file, I would be most eager to hear from
you.
 
						Ken Steele
						University of Toronto

Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 257. Monday, 14 Oct 1991.
 
 
(1)	Date: 	Sat, 12 Oct 91 19:35:42 PDT
	From: 	This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
	Subj: 	SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
(2)	Date: 	Sat, 12 Oct 1991 23:52:16 -0400
	From: 	Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj:   Re: SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
(3)	Date: 	Sun, 13 Oct 91 11:43:54 PDT
	From: 	This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
	Subj: 	SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
 
(1)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Sat, 12 Oct 91 19:35:42 PDT
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject: Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
Comment: 	SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
Who would be motivated to kill the porter of Inverness castle?
 
 
(2)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Sat, 12 Oct 1991 23:52:16 -0400
From: 		Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
Comment:      	Re: SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
ON THE UNSTAGED SCENE CONVERSATION:
 
Though this might be an odd tangent, I was led to think about unexpected
effects of running the beginning of one scene smack onto the ending of
the scene before.  When working with composer Paul Kozel setting up
music and sound effects for OTHELLO last semester, my wife (Susan
Spector of Baruch College) and I began tinkering with the storm that
begins Act II.  Paul brewed up wind on his computer, and then he
suggested some thunder followed by alarum bells to rattle that Cyprus
fortress.  As we talked someone suggested some preliminary storm
warnings during Iago's last speech.  IN the event, we had   "  . . . And
will as tenderly be led by the nose / As asses are."   DISTANT WARNING,
THREATENING RUMBLE  ""I have't. It is engender'd."  Rumble Rumble.
"Hell and night" CRACK "must bring this monstrous birth" --CRACK-- "to
the world's light" KaBOOM CRASH WIND (blow the fuses on the speakers)
THUNDERBOOM.  Iago learned the timing of the two warning CRACKs so he
could bring on the storm with his imaginings.  He would leap into the
air and hurl his arms to pull down the sound.  The next entry
of Montano and his buddies has to fight through the same storm, now
blown 1200 miles to the east . . . Ah, cheap theatrics!  Just like that
gaudy KING LEAR 2.4-3.1 transition.
 
      As a general matter, I wonder how other directors use those
potentialities as actors from one scene reform the imaginative space of
the scene before or after theirs.
 
             Yours ever,
 
	        Steve Urkowitz (SURCC@CUNYVM)
 
 
(3)--------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Sun, 13 Oct 91 11:43:54 PDT
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject: Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
Comment: 	SHK 2.0256  Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
I think the trouble with substituting visual for narrated scenes
is that doing so takes the emphasis off language. It is true
that modern audiences are more accustomed to having their
visualization done for them, rather than allowing the
language to work inside their heads, and sometimes I guess
it makes sense to accommodate that.  But part of the power
of art is to educate its audience, or reader, in the
appropriate mode of perception, and if one tampers too
much with the original balance of vision to words, one
deprives the play of its educative power in this mode.
 
Kay Stockholder

Electronic Texts

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 258. Monday, 14 Oct 1991.
 
Date: 		Sun, 13 Oct 1991 00:30:14 -0400
From: 		Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 2.0255  Public Domain Shakespeare
Comment:      	Re: SHK 2.0255  Public Domain Shakespeare
 
A TECHNOLOGICAL QUERY FOR DAVID RICHMAN:
 
A few years ago I watched an early voice synthesizer talk through some written
text.  I'm wondering how such a device handles "old spelling".  (Could we hear
the differences between Compositor B and Compositor E's stints in First Folio
passages if they spelled their words differently?)  Usually my imagination
about machinery conjurs up either impossible problems for it or fails to
grasp its most basic capacities.  But the more I hear from others about uses
for these electronic texts, the giddier I become.
 
SEPARATE QUERY ON E-TEXTS:
 
Has anyone tried working with Neil Freeman's old-spelling E-texts of Folio
scripts?  He distributes them on Macintosh disks at $50 Canadian per play,
print copy at $14.95.  (He's at 416-497-3979.)
 
Steve Urkowitz

Staging Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 256. Saturday, 12 Oct 1991.
 
 
(1)	Date: 	Thu, 10 Oct 91 14:31:21 CDT
	From: 	This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Timothy Pinnow)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 2.0252  Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
(2)	Date:   Fri, 11 Oct 91 10:41:03 EDT
	From: 	Lorin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj:   Re: SHK 2.0252  Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
 
(1)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Thu, 10 Oct 91 14:31:21 CDT
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Timothy Pinnow)
Subject: 2.0252  Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
Comment: 	Re: SHK 2.0252  Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
I, for one would hope that David Richman is not in the minority.  Staging
the unstaged scenes is, in this actor/director's mind comparable to having
to create the "vasty fields of France."  Shakespeare's plays are a triumph
of the imagination--his and ours.
 
Tim Pinnow
St. Olaf College
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date:         	Fri, 11 Oct 91 10:41:03 EDT
From: 		Lorin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 2.0252  Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
Comment:      	Re: SHK 2.0252  Shakespeare's Unstaged Scenes
 
Well, yes and no.  As a dramatist, faithfulness to the playwright is helpful
insofar as it adds to the production.  No-one stages an uncut version of Antony
and Cleopatra, Hamlet, or Taming of the Shrew, mostly because audiences today
are different than the audiences of yesteryear.
 
As to adding scenes... If the added scene brings something to light in that
particular production, then power to the people.  But I would agree, in most
cases there is little that comes out of the extra scene.  I would hesitate to
say these scenes should not be added.  I don't know if the plays contained many
silent scenes in their original production but I would doubt it.
 
But if I go to a production of MND and the last scene before Puck's apology is
a dance between the gods and mortals, I am likely to be impressed.  Or one day
I may see the porter killed in Macbeth.  Or lady Macbeth.  Or have a silent
scene between the third assassin and Macbeth.

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