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Home :: Archive :: 1991 :: November ::
N&Q: Word Counts; Book; Performance Cal.;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 305. Tuesday, 19 Nov 1991.
 
 
(1)	From: 	
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  (Stephen Orgel)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 2.0304  [Word Counts]
	Date: 	Sun, 17 Nov 91 10:49:15 PST
 
(2)	Date: 	Sun, 17 Nov 91 15:16:28 EST
	From: 	Stephen Matsuba <
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 >
	Subj: 	Small Latin and Less Greek
 
(3)	Date: 	Mon, 18 Nov 1991 14:46:00 -0500
	From: 	William Proctor Williams <TB0WPW1@NIU.BITNET>
	Subj: 	Performance cal.
 
(4)	Date: 	Mon, 18 Nov 1991 21:29:46 -0500
	From: 	Steve Urkowitz <surcc@cunyvm.bitnet>
	Subj:   Re: SHK 2.0304  [Bowdlerizing]
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		
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  (Stephen Orgel)
Subject: 2.0304  [Word Counts]
Comment: 	Re: SHK 2.0304  [Word Counts]
Date: 		Sun, 17 Nov 91 10:49:15 PST
 
Re Nate Johnson's question about word counts, the figures I've seen are
20,000 for Shakespeare, 8000 for Milton -- and 2000 for Racine, most of them
synonyms for honneur and gloire.  I learned this from Harry Levin's
Shakespeare course at Harvard; I have no idea how one would check it.
 
(2)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Sun, 17 Nov 91 15:16:28 EST
From: 		Stephen Matsuba <
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 >
Subject: 	Small Latin and Less Greek
 
After many futile efforts, I thought that the members of SHAKSPER
could help me.  I have been trying to find a copy of T. W. Baldwin's
_Shakespeare's Small Latin Less Greek_ (Urbana 1944), but none of the
bookstores I have gone to have it.  I checked to see if there might be
a reprint, but such a beast is not available.
 
The reason I am not relying on a library copy is that it is being
recalled on a regular basis, so I am playing a kind of library tennis
game with someone.  If anyone knows of somewhere that is selling a
copy, or who wishes to sell their copy, I would be very grateful for
that information.
 
Stephen Matsuba

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(3)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Mon, 18 Nov 1991 14:46:00 -0500
From: 		William Proctor Williams <TB0WPW1@NIU.BITNET>
Subject: 	Performance cal.
 
I think Nate Johnson's idea of an e-mail performance
calendar is a very good one.  If there were a list editor
(Nate Johnson?!) then we could all post her/him what we knew
of and he/she could edit it and send it out.  I would be
willing to contribute.  Also, the editors of +SQ+ and
+Shakespeare Bulletin+, and others would probably also help.
 
William Proctor Williams   TB0WPW1@NIU
 
(4)---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Mon, 18 Nov 1991 21:29:46 -0500
From: 		Steve Urkowitz <surcc@cunyvm.bitnet>
Subject: 2.0304  Bowdlerizing
Comment:      	Re: SHK 2.0304  Bowdlerizing
 
On Bowdlerizing:  Though I didn't follow all the details, recently the
National Council of Teachers of English and other organizations,
particularly of secondary school teachers, staged a major letter-writing
campaign against text-book companies like Scoot-Foresman who had been
silently slicing out anything they felt might be unpalatable to squeamish
school-board textbook committees.  I remember doing a workshop with high
school teachers who complained bitterly about the texts of ROMEO AND JULIET
they worked with.  Some were very pleased to get the 1597 and 1599 quartos
that I had distributed in the workshop so they could lead their students
through the different texts.  One woman who had been doing R&J with fifth
graders ran scenes from Q1, Q2, and a modern text, and by the end of a week
her kids all chose to stick with the old versions, what they called the
"real" ones.  I can't remember where this most recent skirmish was
reported, but I do recall that the publishers backed down and the Nurse's
lines and many more will someday soon return to the tenth grade.
 
      You might like to look at the batty rhetoric used to hide those
"bad" quartos from the perusal of good scholars, an exercise in prejudicial
bard-polishing.  Not naughty words but broken rhythms and occasionally
disreputable constructions are the excuse for hiding these texts away.
Ah well.  Some day we'll all be grown up enough to look without blushing
at whatever those early quartos offer.
 
                  As ever,       Steve Urquartowitz
 

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