1992

Oxford Open Day - CTI

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 26. Friday, 31 Jan 1992.
 
 
Date: 		Tue, 28 Jan 1992 12:31:00 -0500
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject:  	CTI Centre for Textual Studies, Open Day
 
 
			    CTI Centre for Textual Studies
			OUCS, 13 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6NN
 
				Introductory Seminar
 
			Friday 20 March 1992, 10.30am to 4.00pm
 
The CTI Centre is holding an introductory seminar to enable lecturers in
higher education institutions to learn about our work. In the morning there
will be a series of talks and discussion sessions about various aspects
of the use of computers in higher education teaching: practical, pedagogic,
political, institutional, etc.  In the afternoon we will demonstrate some of
the hardware, software, and courseware available for higher education teaching.
There will be opportunity for participants to try out some of the packages for
themselves.  No previous knowledge of computing will be assumed and the open
day will be aimed at people unfamiliar with the CTI.
 
Programme
 
10.30am 		Coffee and Registration
 
11.00am			Introduction to the CTI Programme
			Marilyn Deegan, Director
 
11.30			Computers in the teaching of textual subjects: an
			overview of the resources and major issues
			Stuart Lee, Research Officer
 
12.00pm			Some practical and institutional difficulties
			Christine Mullings, Research Officer
 
12.45pm			Lunch
 
2.00pm			Practical demonstrations and opportunities for hands-on
			experience
 
3.30 to 4.00pm		Wind-up discussion and tea
 
The cost of the open day will be #35.00 (pounds), which includes coffee, lunch,
and tea.  Participants may be able to obtain funding from their staff
development office.  Cheques should be made payable to Oxford University
Computer Services.  If accommodation is required for the Thursday or Friday
evening, please contact us.
 
Please reply to the address below by 6th March 1992.
 
Michele Palmer
Administrative Secretary
CTI Centre for Textual Studies and
Office for Humanities Communication
13 Banbury Road
Oxford
OX2 6NN
 
Tel: 0865 273221
Fax: 0865 273275
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

N&Q: "Open Text"; Recommended Editions

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 25. Friday, 31 Jan 1992.
 
 
(1)	From: 	Stephen Orgel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 3.0024  N&Q: "Open Text"; New Folger Theatre
	Date: 	Mon, 27 Jan 92 21:30:47 PST
 
(2)	Subj: 	Collection for the common reader?
	Date: 	Thu, 30 Jan 1992 10:03:16 -0500
	From: 	This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
 
(1)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		Stephen Orgel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 3.0024  N&Q: "Open Text"; New Folger Theatre
Comment: 	Re: SHK 3.0024  N&Q: "Open Text"; New Folger Theatre
Date: 		Mon, 27 Jan 92 21:30:47 PST
 
Ken--
 
Regarding Germaine Warkentin's query about the term "open text":
 
  "But all interpretations are essentially arbitrary, and Shakespearian
texts are by nature open, offering the director or critic only a range
of possibilities...."  From the Oxford TEMPEST, ed. S. Orgel, Introduction
p.12 (1987).
 
Cheers,
 
The Shadow
 
 
(2)--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Subject: 	Collection for the common reader?
Date: 		Thu, 30 Jan 1992 10:03:16 -0500
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
A friend is looking for a one or several volume collection of complete
works of Shakespeare, "with readable type and good footnotes for a
Shakespeare neophyte". Can anyone give me a suggestion?
 
	Mez
	(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Rs: Ohio/NY/Pen Prodns; Multiple Ariels in Prodn

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 23. Saturday, 25 Jan 1992.
 
 
(1)	Date: 	Fri, 24 Jan 1992 20:15:25 -0500
	From: 	Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj:   Re: SHK 3.0017  Q: Sh'n Prod'ns in Ohio/NY/Penn Region?
 
(2)	Date: 	Sat, 25 Jan 1992 17:55:00 -0500
	From: 	Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	Multiple Ariels
 
 
(1)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Fri, 24 Jan 1992 20:15:25 -0500
From: 		Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 3.0017  Q: Sh'n Prod'ns in Ohio/NY/Penn Region?
Comment:      	Re: SHK 3.0017  Q: Sh'n Prod'ns in Ohio/NY/Penn Region?
 
Two sources for announcements of of theatrical productions are AMERICAN
THEATRE for professional, touring, and repertory companies (usually with one
or two month lead-time for planning before the dates of performance), with
listings by state.  (I think there is a longer-term listing in one of the
monthly issues.)  SHAKESPEARE BULLETIN has a calendar of Shakespearean
productions.  The latest issue lists an ALL's WELL at Villanova Feb 5-9 and
12-16 (phone 215 645-7474).  Novel Stages in Philadelphia will do R&J
Feb 28-Mar 22 at Stage III of Temple U. (phone 215 963 0345).  In Baltimore
a PERICLES runs from Feb 14-Apr 5 at the Head Theatre (301 332 0033).
You might ring up The Acting Company which is on tour with MND until Mar 8
(call 212 564 3510).  Maybe they're flitting your way . . . Their last few
productions have been wonderful.
                                                    Good hunting.
 
                                                    Steve Urkowitz
 
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Sat, 25 Jan 1992 17:55:00 -0500
From: 		Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Multiple Ariels
 
Dear all,
 
I recall that a while ago someone asked whether anyone here knew about
productions of "The Tempest" that involved more than one actor as Ariel.
Sorry I didn't get on this sooner, but work at the beginning of term was
getting out of hand.
 
        In the 1990-1991 season, Dalhousie Theatre Productions (I think
that's what they're called) made such a production, with two actresses.
I was unable to attend, but the production was the subject of a round
discussion in one of my classes, English 3214R (Shakespeare).  Apparently,
the decision was at first a political, rather than strictly artistic, one,
but it met with great approval.
 
        The address of the Theatre Department is below, should anyone want
more information than I can give:
 
        Dalhousie Theatre Department
        Dalhousie Arts Centre
        Dalhousie University
        Halifax, N.S.
        B3H 4H6 (Probably)
        CANADA
 
I hope this helps.
 
	Sincerely,
        Sean Lawrence (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

N&Q: "Open Text"; New Folger Theatre; Hamlet Videos?

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 24. Monday, 27 Jan 1992.
 
 
(1)	From: 	Germaine Warkentin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	Q: Locus Classicus for "Open Text"?
	Date: 	Sun, 26 Jan 92 9:07:00 EST
 
(2)	Date:   Mon, 27 Jan 92 10:33:07 EDT
	From: 	David Alan Grier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj:  	[New Theater at the Folger]
 
(3)	Date: 	Mon, 27 Jan 1992 10:54:58 -0500
	From: 	Cheryl Feight <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj:   Q: Hamlet videotapes for Interactive Multimedia?
 
 
(1)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		Germaine Warkentin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 	Q: Locus Classicus for "Open Text"?
Date: 		Sun, 26 Jan 92 9:07:00 EST
 
Ken, can you or any of the participants on SHAKSPER help?  I am trying
to find the first, or best, reference to the phrase "open text" -- the
_locus classicus_ as it were.  I am assuming it was coined in
connection with the debate over the text of _King Lear_, but I haven't
been able to track it down there or elsewhere.  Possibly I'm just not
looking in the right place.  I would be very grateful for any
assistance.
 
Germaine Warkentin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
 
 
(2)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date:         	Mon, 27 Jan 92 10:33:07 EDT
From: 		David Alan Grier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:  	[New Theater at the Folger]
 
	[Edited by request from private correspondence. -- k.s.]
 
[...]     The Folger Shakespeare Theatre in  Washington, D.C. held an
open house for its new theatre yesterday (1/27).    Located in a rehabiliated
Department store, about 10 blocks from the Folger Shakespeare library, the
theatre is a thrust stage with 440 seats on a single level.  The old theatre
in the Folger Library, was too small to meet the demand for tickets.  Also
the Artistic Director, Michael Kahn, claimed the stage was difficult to work
with and wasn't particularly authentic, despite its decorations.  While some
may miss the intimacy of the old theatre, none will miss the hard seats or
the many obstructed views.  The first production in the new house will be
Much Ado, with Kelly McGillis as Beatrice.
 
 
(3)-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Mon, 27 Jan 1992 10:54:58 -0500
From: 		Cheryl Feight <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:      	Q: Hamlet videotapes for interactive multimedia?
 
	[The following query was forwarded to SHAKSPER at the
	suggestion of fellow member Peter Scott.  If anyone can offer
	any suggestions, I will forward them to the originator of this
	note as well as the list. -- k.s.]
 
A colleague and I are developing an interactive multimedia course on Hamlet.
It includes selected audio passages and still images from videotape; however,
we have had some difficulty acquiring permission to use the videotapes.
Therefore, we posted a notice on isaac* asking for suggestions including
public domain videotapes as well as those done by regional or college theatres.
Peter Scott saw my notice and suggested that I contact you.  We sincerely
appreciate any help you are able to provide.
 
Thank you in advance for your time and attention.
 
(*isaac is the bulletin board for higher education folks interested in
computing)
 
Cheryl

*Tempest* Paper on the SHAKSPER Fileserver

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 22. Saturday, 25 Jan 1992.
 
 
Date:		Saturday January 25, 1992
From:		Ken Steele <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject:	*The Tempest* Paper on the Fileserver
 
 
Dear Fellow SHAKSPEReans;
 
[Yet another new addition to the SHAKSPER Fileserver this week -- a
paper by Ben Ross Schneider, Jr., entitled "Pseudo-Tempests,
Counter-Tempests, and The Tempest."  It's available in the Scholarly
Papers section of the SHAKSPER Fileserver as SCHNEIDR TEMPEST SHAKSPER.
 
Here is the opening paragraph... -- k.s.]
 
 
     Each age creates the version of Shakespeare that suits it best:
we have had a neo-classical Shakespeare and a romantic one.  The
twentieth century has brought us an aesthetic Shakespeare, and, as it
draws to a close, it brings a political Shakespeare.  These last two
schools of interpretation are at opposite poles theoretically.  The
aesthetic school assumes an objective text, something out there, an
artifact.  The political school recognizes no single text; each reader
creates his own text in the act of reading.  This premise rules out
aesthetic criticism, for beauty can reside only in an object.  The
aesthetic critic must be able to describe the way in which the parts
of the object are organized into a whole.  Organization is beauty.
And if it is whole, it is one, and its meaning is one.  But political
critics cannot allow unity, for there must be many ways to read a text
if the political way is to be one of them.
 
 
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Fileserver Procedures:
 
SHAKSPEReans can retrieve the complete text file from the SHAKSPER
Fileserver by issuing the interactive command, "TELL LISTSERV
AT UTORONTO GET SCHNEIDR TEMPEST SHAKSPER".  If your network link does
not support the interactive "TELL" command, or if Listserv rejects
your request, then send a one-line mail message (without a subject
line) to LISTSERV@utoronto, reading "GET SCHNEIDR TEMPEST SHAKSPER".
 
For a complete list of files available, send the command "GET
SHAKSPER FILES SHAKSPER" to obtain an annotated index.
 
For further information, consult the appropriate section of your
SHAKSPER GUIDE, or contact the editor, <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> or
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

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