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Home :: Archive :: 1992 :: January ::
Qs: Shakespeare's Correspondence; Elizabethan
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 10. Tuesday, 14 Jan 1992.
 
 
(1)	Date: 	Tue, 14 Jan 1992 16:23:00 -0500
	Subj: 	Shakespeare's Correspondence
	From: 	John Massa <
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 >
 
(2)	From: 	Richard Abrams <rabrams@portland.bitnet>
	Date: 	Mon, 13 Jan 1992 09:44:51 -0500
	Subj:   Ficino: 16th-C portrait?
 
 
(1)-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Tue, 14 Jan 1992 16:23:00 -0500
Subject: 	Shakespeare's Correspondence
From: 		John Massa <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
 
          Is there any evidence for Shakespeare having written a
          letter to anyone?  The biographies of him that I have read
          do not mention any, as far as I can remember.
 
          If not, does anyone know of any other correspondence among
          or involving English playwrights during Shakespeare's
          lifetime?
 
          If there is no evidence of Shakespeare's correspondence, I
          am trying to understand whether I should be surprised about
          this or not.  One would think that a man of letters would be
          writing them too, and that there would be at least some
          indirect evidence, if not the letters themselves.
 
          Any insights out there?
 
          (No, I am not a secret agent for the Earl of Oxford
          Fan Club.)
 
          John Massa
          
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(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------
	
From: 		Richard Abrams <rabrams@portland.bitnet>
Date: 		Mon, 13 Jan 1992 09:44:51 -0500
Subject:      	Ficino: 16th-C portrait?
 
	[Ed. Note: The following query is reproduced from FICINO,
	13 January 1992, because it seems of relevance to SHAKSPER. -- k.s.]
 
I am trying to decipher a British miniature portrait of perhaps the
late 1590s.  The gentleman-sitter wears a high-ruff collar and a black
cloak or tunic, with a row of barely-visible black buttons in front.
Several inches to the right of the buttons there descends a black cord
or braid.  Does this costume say anything to anybody?  I'm particularly
interested in that cord, which appears to me ceremonial in function,
perhaps the mark of membership in some society.  Also odd is the contrast
between the high collar and the informal, round-shouldered,  even lump-
ish cloak.
 
  (2) Presumably, it would be possible to date the sitter from the unusual
collar, since fashions in lace collars came and went, I suppose, in short
cycles.  Can anyone recommend a reference book on lace collars in Eliza-
bethan England?
Thank you for any help you can provide.
 
 
Prof. Richard Abrams
Dept. of English
University of Southern Maine, Portland
(207)-772-6990
 

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