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Home :: Archive :: 1992 :: April ::
Authorship: Hyslop, Oxford
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 79. Sunday, 5 Apr 1992.
 
 
(1)	From: 	Michael Dobson <
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	Subj: 	Re: SHK 3.0074  Rs: Hyslop as Bard
	Date: 	Tue, 31 Mar 92 14:07:39 CST
 
(2)	Date: 	Fri, 03 Apr 1992 10:03:12 EST
	From: 	
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  (Hardy M. Cook)
	Subj: 	The Latest from the Oxfordians
 
 
(1)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Michael Dobson <
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 >
Subject: 3.0074  Rs: Hyslop as Bard
Comment: 	Re: SHK 3.0074  Rs: Hyslop as Bard
Date: 		Tue, 31 Mar 92 14:07:39 CST
 
Dear Shaksperians --
                      William Proctor Williams' suggestion that Ian Hyslop
would make at least as acceptable a candidate for the role of Shakespeare's
ghost writer as the Earl of Oxford is an extremely valuable one.  However,
in case any devout Oxfordians are thinking of defecting to the Hyslop camp
already, I should point out that when I worked alongside Mr Hyslop years
ago teaching A-level Shakespeare to bemused 18 year-olds in Kensington he
made no attempt to collect a royalty fee on any of the set texts --
behaviour one would certainly expect from Hyslop if he had contributed so
much as a comma to any of them; however, what convinces me most of all that
Mr Hyslop did not write the plays is that he never expressed the slightest
respect for Lewis Theobald during the entire period of our acquaintance.
Any author fortunate enough not only to have written the Shakespeare canon
but to have read Theobald's edition would surely have had more to say on
the subject.
 
     The objection that Mr Hyslop was not born when the plays were first
produced is negligible, by comparison; the Earl of Oxford, after all, was
safely dead long before most of them were written.  Until Mr Hyslop informs
me reliably to the contrary, or until some actual evidence is produced to
substantiate the claim that nearly everyone alive between 1590 and 1660 was
implicated in a vast and inexplicable conspiracy to tell pointless lies
about the copyright of a book some time before copyright was even invented,
I shall continue to believe, gull that I am, that Shakespeare, despite
being merely a full-time member of the theatrical profession rather than an
irrelevant courtier, probably wrote his own plays.
 
     Consequently I shall not be instructing OUP to delete *Shakespeare*
and insert *Hyslop* throughout my forthcoming book *The Making of the
National Poet*.  I hope this will not deter anyone except Mr Hyslop himself
from buying it.
 
Michael Dobson
 
(2)-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: 		Fri, 03 Apr 1992 10:03:12 EST
From: 		
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  (Hardy M. Cook)
Subject: 	The Latest from the Oxfordians
 
SHAKSPEReans,
 
I received the following letter and survey in the mail the other day.
 
 
                                Hardy M. Cook
                                
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		-----------------------------------------
		
March 27, 1992
 
Dear Sir or Madam:
 
As you know, the Shakespeare controversy has engaged the imagination of the
academic community for several generations. More recently, though, the
subject of who wrote the works of Shakespeare has ventured beyond academia
to take on broader dimensions. Just last year, U.S. Supreme Court Justice
John Paul Stevens lectured on the topic at Wilkes University, while
*The Atlantic Monthly,* devoted 40 pages toward an exploration of this
compelling subject.
 
My own abiding interest in the authorship issue also is a personal concern,
as the individual many scholars now consider to be the true author of these
remarkable plays is an ancestor of mine, Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford.
 
To contribute toward the store of knowledge on William Shakespeare, I founded
The De Vere Society while pursuing my studies at Oxford University. The
Society carried out research and published its findings in a quarterly
journal, maintained reference library, and sponsored a series of lectures.
 
Now that the subject has entered the intellectual mainstream in the United
States, however, I feel that an in-depth and scholarly program on the topic
should reach as wide an audience as possible. We are currently planing to
present a live, interactive videoconference, or a videotaped presentation,
that will explore this exciting issue at length. We have secured the
services of Mr. William F. Buckley, Jr. as host and moderator.
 
You are cordially invited to participate in the development of this endeavor
Enclosed is a brief questionnaire soliciting your input and advice in helping
us create an excellent program. I would appreciate the favor of your reply.
 
Sincerely,
 
Charles Beauclerk
Earl of Burford
 
=============================================================================
FAXBACK Viewer Survey
 
Return to VisNet, FAX (203) 965-2463
PLEASE RETURN BY FRIDAY, APRIL 10. 1992
 
VisNet is presenting a three-hour TV program on the Shakespeare Authorship
Issue on September 17, 1992. Please assist us in the development of this
presentation. Thank you for your cooperation.
 
1. Your profession is: O Academic   O Business or Industry    O Government
                        O English or Literature
                        O Drama
                        O Other
2. Rate your current knowledge of the Shakespeare Authorship Issue:
     O very high      O moderate     O none
     O high           O low
3. What is your position on the Authorship Issue?
     O William Shakespeare was the author
     O Edward de Vere was the author
     O don't care
4. Would you prefer to see:
     O only de Vere's case presented
     O only Shakespeare's case presented
     O both points of view presented
 
5. What are the most important areas you would like to see developed and
discussed.
 
 
6. Would you prefer:
   O an interactive videoconference via telephone with a panel of experts
   O a videotaped program
 
7. If you prefer an interactive videoconference, would you be interested in
voting on issues discussed on the program through a toll-free number?
   O yes      O no
 
8. If you prefer a video conference, when would be the best time to have it
broadcast?
   O day                             O evening
     time preference                   time preference
 
9. Will your business, organization or institution:
     O pay a $1,250 site license fee for a satellite broadcast
     O pay $600 to $900 for a videotape
     O not interested
     O don't know
 
        (Use additional pages for suggestions or comments)
 

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