1992

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 89. Friday, 17 Apr 1992.
 
 
(1)	Date: 	Tue, 14 Apr 1992 11:17 EDT
	From: 	This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
	Subj: 	Trinculo's "Birth"
 
(2)	Date: 	Tue, 14 Apr 92 18:00:50 PDT
	From: 	This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
	Subj: 	SHK 3.0084  Queries: The Tempest, Italian History, Etc.
 
(3)	Date:   Wed, 15 Apr 1992 12:05:42 -0500 (CDT)
	From: 	Jim Harner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 3.0070  Q: Performance Reviews
 
 
(1)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: 		Tue, 14 Apr 1992 11:17 EDT
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject: 	Trinculo's "Birth"
 
In response to Geoff Wall's third query, I seem to remember that a
production of *The Tempest* at The Mount in Lenox, MA (USA) by the
group called Shakespeare & Company in the summer of 1980, it probably
was, made clear the metaphoric nature of Trinculo's "delivery" from
under Caliban's gaberdine.  The moment resonates particularly with
Trinculo's earlier remark that if he could get Caliban to England,
the monster would "make a man."  "Any strange beast there makes a
man" (II.ii.30-31).  He means "make," in the economic sense of "make
one's fortune," of course, and hardly anticipates becoming "the siege"
of the mooncalf.  "To make" in childish parlance is often "to defecate,"
and the sense "to give birth" is clearly present as well, perhaps
via the common childish confusion of semen and urine, birth and
excretion.  And a failure to recognize a kinship with the monstrous
(from Latin *monstrum*, a divine portent or warning) Caliban is
certainly an index of moral inadequacy in this play.
 
                                          Ron Macdonald
                                          <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
 
(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: 		Tue, 14 Apr 92 18:00:50 PDT
From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject: Queries: The Tempest, Italian History, Etc.
Comment: 	SHK 3.0084  Queries: The Tempest, Italian History, Etc.
 
One thing that the setting in Italian city states does is
conceal the ideological implications of the fact that Duke
Prospero has, on the basis of his learning, elevated
himself above King Alonso, and has finally, as Gonzolo
comments, insured that his progenty will occupy the
throne of Naples. Translated to an English polity, he
has managed to pull off what Macbeth couldn't.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------
Date:    	Wed, 15 Apr 1992 12:05:42 -0500 (CDT)
From: 		Jim Harner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Subject: 3.0070  Q: Performance Reviews
Comment: 	RE: SHK 3.0070  Q: Performance Reviews
 
Apologies for such a belated response to Luis Gamez's query about
locating reviews of the 1987 Stratford +Othello=. J. A. B. Somerset's
superb +The Stratford Festival Story: A Catalogue-Index to the Stratford,
Ontario, Festival, 1953-1990= (New York: Greenwood, 1991) cites up to
40 reviews of each production. (Additional reviews may be included in
the databases underlying the catalogue; the databases may be consulted
at Stratford or through Somerset [U of Western Ontario].)
 
			Jim Harner
 
		

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