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Home :: Archive :: 1992 :: April ::
Rs: Branagh; Computers & SAA; Olivier
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 93. Tuesday, 21 Apr 1992.
 
 
(1)	Date: 	Sat, 18 Apr 1992 02:10:30 -0400
	From: 	Laura Hayes Burchard <
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 >
	Subj: 	Coriolanus, Branagh
 
(2)	Date: 	Tue, 21 Apr 1992 00:06:42 -0400
	From: 	Steve Urkowitz <surcc@cunyvm.bitnet>
	Subj:   Re: SHK 3.0086  Shakespeare's Language and Computers
 
(3)	Date: 	Tue, 21 Apr 1992 00:42:08 -0400
	From: 	Steve Urkowitz <surcc@cunyvm.bitnet>
	Subj:   Re: SHK 3.0091  Miscellaneous Queries
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Sat, 18 Apr 1992 02:10:30 -0400
From: 		Laura Hayes Burchard <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Subject: 	Coriolanus, Branagh
 
Vinton Cerf writes:
 
>In the
>meantime, we understand that Kenneth Branagh is scheduled
>to play in Coriolanus sometime in the next several months,
>but we don't know where or when. Does anyone happen to know
>and, if so, at which theatre? We would like to make reservations
>if the site isn't too far from Washington, DC.
 
Unfortunately, I think it will be a bit too far away.  A note I
got indicates that the Renaissance Company will be doing Coriolanus
with Branagh, Judi Dench, and Richard Briers in May at Chichester,
England, and Branagh will be doing Hamlet with the RSC in London at
the end of the year, but nothing in the US.
 
Renaissance is also filming Much Ado About Nothing in August.  One
of my favorite plays; I hope Branagh's version will be as cherishable
as his Henry V.
 
Laura
 
(2)-------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Tue, 21 Apr 1992 00:06:42 -0400
From: 		Steve Urkowitz <surcc@cunyvm.bitnet>
Subject: 3.0086  Shakespeare's Language and Computers
Comment:      	Re: SHK 3.0086  Shakespeare's Language and Computers
 
In reply to Randall Robinson's query about forming an SAA Seminar on
computers and Shakespearean language . . . Do indeed suggest it, though
the time for proposing seminars or program ideas is up to and including
the days of the conference itself.  Then the trustees and officers sort
through the possibilities that have been gathered during the previous year
by the program committee.  Please, please be aware that this has been a
thrillingly OPEN process, and the committees and individuals involved
eagerly seek ideas.  One way you might encourage people would be to submit
an essay describing your own work to be part of one of the "competitive"
panels; these are the papers that are sent in by members at large rather
than pieces specifically requested by a program committee.  These have
often been the most exciting events at annual meetings.  Also, just to get
people talking about their own projects you might send in an announcement
of your project and a call for replies, to be printed by the various
journals.  SHAKESPEARE BULLETIN, the new editors at SHAKESPEARE NEWSLETTER,
and further postings here on SHAKSPER.  Lotsa quiet folks out there waiting
for interesting ideas to come along.
 
As ever,
Steve Urkowitz  SURCC@CUNYVM
 
(3)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Tue, 21 Apr 1992 00:42:08 -0400
From: 		Steve Urkowitz <surcc@cunyvm.bitnet>
Subject: 3.0091  Miscellaneous Queries
Comment:      	Re: SHK 3.0091  Miscellaneous Queries
 
Some quick thoughts to Amy Lewis:  Olivier's movie is in black and white,
it's driven by a very reductive idea of how the play works "This is the
story of a man who cannot make up his mind" or words to that defect, and it
has put me to sleep any number of times.  The Zefferelli color movie (I can't
spell his name either without having it before me) won't let you fall asleep,
but you might have some trouble figuring out why anyone thinks that HAMLET
has much interest to intellectuals.  Both films can be had on videotape.
You might want to look very closely at just one short moment that appears
in both films, and then just say what you see.  That binocular experience
of laying one image next to another helps us to "see in depth."  If you
want a wild academic ride besides the film-viewing, try finding the equivalent
moments from the films in your modern text, and look at them also in the
1603 and the 1605 and the 1623 versions likely available in a college
library.  It'll take you time, but you'll be out there at the edge.
Good luck, and let us know what you find.  We're all here waiting, trying to
see this stuff with the freshness that you have already.
 
Steve Urkowitz
SURCC@CUNYVM
 

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