1992

Shakespeare on the Screen

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 114. Friday, 29 May 1992.
 
 
(1)	From: 	Ann Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Friday, May 29, 1992, 09:17:00 -0400
	Subj: 	Shakespeare on the Screen and a Question
 
(2)	From:	Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Friday, May 29, 1992
	Subj:	*Shakespeare on Film Newsletter*
 
(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		Ann Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, May 29, 1992, 09:17:00 -0400
Subject: 	Shakespeare on the Screen and a Question
 
In regard to the battle scene in Branagh's *Henry V*.  Has anyone else
noticed its relationship to the battle scene in Kurasowa's *Ran*?  The
mood, lighting, use of music and editing are so similar I'm convinced
that Branagh was influenced by that film.
 
I would also like to note (librarian that I am) a newish reference
book which might be of interest to SHAKSPEReans.
 
*Shakespeare on Screen: An International Filmography and Videography*
by Kenneth S. Rothwell and Annabelle Henkin Melzer (New York: Neal-
Schuman, 1990 $59.95 ISBN 1-55570-049-7) provides information on video
and film versions of the plays and sonnets.   Entries include an
evaluation of the work and performances, info on the media used,
performers and distribution and availability.  While the last is
likely to be dated, it is still most useful.  Evaluations provide
analysis of interpretation, performances and references to other
reviews of the work.  The scope is international, and this means truly
international not just Europe and North America.  It also includes
derivative works (my favorite -- *Harry and Tonto* ... under *King
Lear*). The indexes are comprehensive and include an "Index to Series
and Genres" and an chronological index of films and videos.
 
I find the evaluations most useful and occasionally funny.  One on a
version of *Hamlet* ends with the comment, "To watch it is to risk
brain damage."  I like honesty in an evaluation.
 
Lastly, a question.
 
Our library's set of the Furness Variorium Shakespeare is crumbling on
the shelf.  I cannot locate where, or even if, new editions are being
published.  Ideally what I need is a reprint of the Furness.  On acid
free paper if at all possible so that we won't have to go through this
process all over again in fifty years.
 
Does anyone know of a publisher reprinting the Furness?  Or even
continuing the Variorium series?  You can respond directly to me
unless you think others might find this useful.
 
(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From:		Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Friday, May 29, 1992
Subject:	*Shakespeare on Film Newsletter*
 
The editors of the *Shakespeare on Film Newsletter*, Bernice W. Kliman
and Kenneth S. Rothwell, have just announced that starting immediately
the *Shakespeare on Film Newsletter* will be merging with the *Shakespeare
Bulletin*.  Kliman and Rothwell will be contributing editors of *Shakespeare
Bulletin*, attending to Shakespeare on screen for the journal.  [The main
editors of *Shakespeare Bulletin* are, of course, June Schlueter and Jim
Lusardi, members of SHAKSPER.]
 
All present subscribers to *SFNL* will be entitled to a one-for-one
subscrition to *Shakespeare Bulletin*; those who already subscribe to
*Shakespeare Bulletin* will enjoy an extension of their subscription
equivalent to their *Shakespeare on Film Newsletter* subscription.

ATHE Conference

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 113. Thursday, 28 May 1992.
 
From: 		Steve Schrum <sas14%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, May 28, 1992, 12:37:00 -0400
Subject: 	ATHE Conference
 
Please pardon the duplication, but I'm sending this to the
various theatre-related LISTSERV areas.
 
I am planning to attend the ATHE (Association for Theatre in
Higher Education) conference in August. I would like to propose
that those of us involved in online communication and who know
each other only by arcane Bitnet/Internet addresses meet for
actual face-to-face, uh, interfacing. Perhaps a breakfast would
work (although, not being a morning person, I will ask for alternatives).
Please e-mail me directly and let me know if you'd like to do this.
 
Thanks.
 
Steve Schrum
Penn State University, Hazleton
Bitnet: SAS14@psuvm
Internet: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Information Technology Questionnaire

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 111. Thursday, 28 May 1992.
 
From: 		Stuart Lee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, May 27, 1992, 11:19:00 -0400
Subject:	Information Technology Questionnaire
 
Dear All,
 
	I was asked by Nicola Timbrell to circulate this accordingly concerning
the use of Hypermedia in various humanities subjects. She would greatly
appreciate as much feedback as possible as the results are going into a survey
she is perfoming for the ITTI project based at Oxford University,
 
Thanks in advance,
 
Stuart Lee
CTI Centre
Oxford University Computing Services
******************************************************************************
 
Dear Colleague,
 
The Information Technology Training Initiative (ITTI) funds 24 projects
in the U.K.  The Oxford ITTI project, Hypermedia in Language and
Literature Subjects, aims to develop computer based tools and techniques
for the preparation of teaching and research materials in these
subjects.
 
Hypertext is a computer-based application which allows automatic links
between various nodes of information.  Hypermedia is a more general term
than hypertext and is used to suggest that the information exists in
different forms or exists on different media.  Information can be a
piece of text, an image, a sound, or a clip of video.  Hypermedia
techniques are being used successfully in teaching and research in
higher education; the present survey is an attempt to assess the extent
of their use.  We would be grateful, therefore, if you could complete
and return this questionnaire  to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
The results of the survey will be incorporated in a review of
current developments in Hypermedia in Language and Literature to be
published later this year by the Office for Humanities
Communication.
 
Yours sincerely
 
Nicola Timbrell
 
 
 
				QUESTIONNAIRE
 
Name:
 
Department:
 
Institution:
 
Address:
 
 
 
Telephone:
 
E-mail:
 
Job Title:
 
1.  What are your main teaching areas?
 
 
 
2.  What are your main research areas?
 
 
 
3.  If you are developing hypertext/hypermedia we would be grateful if
you would supply project details.  Attach as many extra sheets as
necessary.  If you have written any articles etc., we would be grateful
for references or offprints.
 
 
 
 
4.  If you are using hypertext/hypermedia in your teaching/research,
could you give details, hardware, software, courseware, etc.  We are
particularly interested in any evaluation you may have done.
 
 
 
 
5.  If you are not already doing so, would you be interested in using
hypertext/hypermedia in your teaching or research? Yes/No
 
If no, please give reasons
 
 
 
 
PLEASE RETURN TO: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Productions of the Apocrypha

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 112. Thursday, 28 May 1992.
 
From: 		Michael Dobson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, May 28, 1992, 10:51:06 CDT
Subject:	Productions of Apocrypha
 
Dear SHAKSPEReans:
 
Re: Productions of the Apocrypha -- since no-one else seems to have
mentioned it, may I mention Barry Kyle's 1986 production of *Two Noble
Kinsmen*, the inaugural production at the RSC's Swan Theatre in Stratford?
Reviews published at the time and the relevant *Shakespeare Survey* will
provide ample commentary for anyone willing to look them up -- let me
simply observe here that Imogen Stubbs' performance as the Gaoler's
Daughter really was as good as everyone said it was, quite rightly
establishing her as the best young classical actress of her time.  I knew
she was good when we were students together -- she played a very shrewd
Cressida back in 1980 -- but never guessed she would turn out *that* good;
I don't think I've ever seen a higher proportion of an audience weeping as
I did after her final exit line (If you hurt me, I'll cry).  I daresay the
G's D.
 
While I'm here let me warmly second Prof Urkowitz's misgivings about
Branagh's *Henry V*; who was it who pointed out that it offered the most
vivid statement yet of Margaret Thatcher's position on the European
Community?  The real giveaway on those supposedly compassionate and
pacific battle-scenes is the music, which is all pompous vagueness and
war-memorials, completely undercutting what particularity the scenes manage
to retain.  Walton's score was incisive by comparison.  I quite enjoyed
Branagh's performance in the part on stage (when Branagh's Henry V was
still Adrian Noble's!) but the film seems profoundly dishonest, however
successfully it may have made Tad Davis want to die for his king.
 
I actually think that Shakespeare's plays make actively bad films, but
there we are. I quite enjoyed Trevor Nunn's *Othello* video, but this
may be purely because it has Imogen Stubbs in it as Desdemona.  Is it
on release in the States yet?  If not, why not? McKellen plays Iago
as a grubby, horribly confiding Yorkshire corporal; it's a fascinatingly
creepy performance.  To be seen.
 
 
Best regards ---
 
Michael Dobson

Book of Sir Thomas More, Various Items

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 110. Thursday, 28 May 1992.
 
From: 		Laura Hayes Burchard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, May 27, 1992, 22:25:36 -0400
Subject:	Book of Sir Thomas More, various items
 
My beloved, but quite ancient, Harrison has a discussion of the scene
in *The Book of Thomas More* in "Hand D" that at the time was thought
likely to be Shakespeare.  The later stuff I've looked at doesn't cite
it, which makes me suspect that it has been discredited in the
interval - but if it hasn't, has anybody taken their computers and
word pattern analyzers to it, and with what result?
 
What collected editions would people recommend to replace the Harrison
(which is suffering from the results of forty years and two
generations of hard use).  I dropped hints last Christmas, and
ended up with a decidedly inferior Doubleday edition.  The fact that
it didn't have the historical data of the Harrison I could live with
but having all notes and obsolete word definitions in the back of the
book instead of the foot of the page is unbearable.  I'd like something
with a great deal of background and textual information that still
remains relatively totable.
 
I'm also looking for a couple of Renaissance Theatre Company items.
Does anybody know if the version of Hamlet they recently did for
BBC Radio Three is going to be released on tape in the US? John
Gielgud, Derek Jacobi, Kenneth Branagh, Judi Dench, Michael Holdern,
Richard Briers, Emma and Sophie Thompson, Michael Williams *and* an
uncut text sounds heavenly. There was also a video made covering
the company's preparations to play Hamlet on stage, called "Discovering
Hamlet," that I'd like to take a look at.  Do any university (or public,
for that matter) libraries in or around DC have it?
 
Laura Burchard

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