1992

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 162. Monday, 6 July 1992.
 
 
(1)	From: 	Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, July 6, 1992, 10:20:00 -0400
	Subj: 	THE ROSE: Another Book
 
(2)	From:	Hardy M. Cook
	Date:	Monday, July 6, 1992
	Subj:	Suggestions for Shakespeare and Modern Drama Course
 
(3)	From: 	Piers Lewis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, July 6, 1992, 12:08:00 -0400
	Subj: 	[Email Address]
 
 
(1)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From:		Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, July 6, 1992, 10:20:00 -0400
Subject: 	THE ROSE: Another Book
 
Dear colleagues,
 
Here is another reference on the recent developments around the Rose Theatre.
It arrived here only last Friday.
 
    Christine ECCLES, *The Rose Theatre*, London: Nick Hern Books,
    1990, or in America, New York: Routledge/Theatre Arts Books, 1990.
 
Perhaps this is old news for some of you, but others may never have seen it,
which was our case since we ordered it eight weeks ago.
 
Enjoy your summer and leave no beach-sand in your books . . .
 
          Luc Borot
	  <ELI16@FRMOP22>
 
(2)--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From:		Hardy M. Cook
Date:		Monday, July 6, 1992
Subject:	Suggestions for Shakespeare and Modern Drama Course
 
>A colleague and I are in the early stages of planning to team-teach a
>course that will pair some of Shakespeare's plays with twentieth-century
>revisions/adaptations/appropriations, so it seemed only natural to see if
>any members of SHAKSPER have any advice or suggestions. I'd be interested in
>hearing from anyone who has taught (or contemplated) such a course.
 
Off the top of my head, I would suggest Stoppard's *Rosencrantz and
Guildenstern are Dead*.  You may also consider Brecht's *The Life of
Edward II of England*; though a rewrite of Marlow's play, Brecht's *E2*
might serve well as a twentieth-century history play.  There is also
that sixties parody *Macbird*.
 
					Hardy M. Cook
					This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		Piers Lewis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, July 6, 1992, 12:08:00 -0400
Subject: 	[Email Address]
 
Does anyone know where Cesar Barber is living now and if he has an Internet
or Bitnet address?
 
Piers Lewis
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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