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Home :: Archive :: 1992 :: July ::
More on the Sonnets
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 179.  Thursday, 23 July 1992.
 
 
(1)	From: 	Ed Pechter <
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	Date: 	Wednesday, July 22, 1992, 11:31 EDT
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 3.0178  Spinoffs; Begatting the Begetter
 
(2)	From:	Hardy M. Cook <
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	Date:	Thursday, July 23, 1992
	Subj:	Nobility of the Young Man
 
 
(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		Ed Pechter <
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Date: 		Wednesday, July 22, 1992, 11:31 EDT
Subject: 3.0178  Spinoffs; Begatting the Begetter
Comment: 	Re: SHK 3.0178  Spinoffs; Begatting the Begetter
 
I'm not sure exactly what Tim Bowden was asking or saying, but he
might be interested in Donald Foster's *PMLA* essay in 1987, which
argued very convincingly that WH was a misprint for WS = Shakespeare.
How prosaic!  I grieve to have a soulless image on the eye that had
usurped upon a living thought.  Still, as Philip Larkin once wrote,
"useful to get that learnt."
 
More in sorrow,
 
Ed Pechter
 
(2)-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From:		Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:		Thursday, July 23, 1992
Subject:	Nobility of the Young Man
 
I too found Foster's *PMLA* article convincing.  I would, however, like to
look for a moment at an internal issue with the sonnets.  Someone recently, I
believe that it was Joseph Pequigney although I cannot find it in my notes,
suggested that there is NO internal evidence that the Young Friend is a
nobleman.  On the other hand, Leonard Tennenhouse argues that the sonnets
embody a political language, "a language for negotiating with a patron for the
client's position."
 
Fully aware of E. K. Chambers's pronouncement that "more folly has been
written about the sonnets than about any other Shakespearean topic," I am
wondering if in fact we can identify the Young Man as a noble or not based on
the sonnets themselves?
 
                                             Hardy M. Cook
                                             
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