1992

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 179.  Thursday, 23 July 1992.
 
 
(1)	From: 	Ed Pechter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Wednesday, July 22, 1992, 11:31 EDT
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 3.0178  Spinoffs; Begatting the Begetter
 
(2)	From:	Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Thursday, July 23, 1992
	Subj:	Nobility of the Young Man
 
 
(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		Ed Pechter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, July 22, 1992, 11:31 EDT
Subject: 3.0178  Spinoffs; Begatting the Begetter
Comment: 	Re: SHK 3.0178  Spinoffs; Begatting the Begetter
 
I'm not sure exactly what Tim Bowden was asking or saying, but he
might be interested in Donald Foster's *PMLA* essay in 1987, which
argued very convincingly that WH was a misprint for WS = Shakespeare.
How prosaic!  I grieve to have a soulless image on the eye that had
usurped upon a living thought.  Still, as Philip Larkin once wrote,
"useful to get that learnt."
 
More in sorrow,
 
Ed Pechter
 
(2)-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From:		Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, July 23, 1992
Subject:	Nobility of the Young Man
 
I too found Foster's *PMLA* article convincing.  I would, however, like to
look for a moment at an internal issue with the sonnets.  Someone recently, I
believe that it was Joseph Pequigney although I cannot find it in my notes,
suggested that there is NO internal evidence that the Young Friend is a
nobleman.  On the other hand, Leonard Tennenhouse argues that the sonnets
embody a political language, "a language for negotiating with a patron for the
client's position."
 
Fully aware of E. K. Chambers's pronouncement that "more folly has been
written about the sonnets than about any other Shakespearean topic," I am
wondering if in fact we can identify the Young Man as a noble or not based on
the sonnets themselves?
 
                                             Hardy M. Cook
                                             This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.