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Home :: Archive :: 1992 :: July ::
Nobility of the Young Man
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 180.  Friday, 24 July 1992.
 
 
(1)	From:	Leo Daugherty <
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	Date: 	Friday, July 24, 1992, 01:35:58 -0700
	Subj: 	Nobility of the Young Man
 
(2)	From: 	Tim Bowden <
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	Date: 	Thursday, July 23, 1992, 11:03:10 PDT
	Subj: 	Sonnets sense...
 
 
(1)-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		Leo Daugherty <
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Date: 		Friday, July 24, 1992, 01:35:58 -0700
Subject: 	Nobility of the Young Man
 
As to whether it is possible to "identify the Young Man as a noble or not
based on the sonnets themselves":  Assuming that the sequence to the friend
actually refers to then-living persons and their actions (which it may or
may not, although I think there's good reason to think it does), it does
appear impossible to conclude one way or the other about the addressee's
nobility.  There is simply no evidence on which to base such a conclusion.
Still, going with the same assumption, it would be hard to believe that
the "Fair Youth" did not enjoy higher social status than that of the poet.
 
p.s.:  Foster (among many others over the years) has recently claimed that
there's no evidence for the male addressee's being a nobleman -- but that
was in an MLA paper from 1990 which I don't believe has been published.
 
(2)------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		Tim Bowden <
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Date: 		Thursday, July 23, 1992, 11:03:10 PDT
Subject: 	Sonnets sense...
 
> Someone recently, I believe that it was Joseph Pequigney although
> I cannot find it in my notes, suggested that there is NO internal
> evidence that the Young Friend is a nobleman.
 
D'ya mean he might even have been - say, a wigmaker's apprentice?
 
One other little aside - the irony of the Bard's often-repeated
derision of the phony element, which he saw as French, of facial
cosmetics and wigs.  Wonder how that satire played at home when he
was living with the Huguenot wigmaker Mountjoy?
 
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