1992

RE: Shakespeare and Modern Drama Course

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 168. Thursday, 9 July 1992.
 
From: 		Pamela A Vasile <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, July 9, 1992, 12:27:00 -0400
Subject: 	Suggestions for Shakespeare and Modern Drama Course
 
Although what I'm about to suggest isn't quite as specific as "Shakespeare
and Modern Drama," you may find some of these works useful or interesting
for your course.  This coming fall, I will be taking a seminar on "Traditions
in Medieval and Renaissance Drama" with Lois Potter.  Here is how she
described the seminar for the list of graduate course descriptions:
 
	This course will explore different phases of a theatrical tradition
	based on ritual, moral allegory, storytelling, and direct rapport
	with the audience, from the Biblical cycle drama of the medieval
	craft guilds to the provocative experiment with cross-gender
	casting in Caryl Churchill.  The emphasis will be on the
	relationship between plays of different periods:  thus, we will
	read Elizabethan plays that draw on morality and romance traditions
	as well as a few modern plays that experiment with the subjects
	and theatrical techniques of medieval and Renaissance theatre.
	Texts will include the following, subject to availability:
	Peter Happe,ed., ENGLISH MYSTERY PLAYS; Peter Happe, ed.,TUDOR
	INTERLUDES; C. Whitworth, ed., THREE SIXTEENTH-CENTURY COMEDIES;
	David Lindsay, ANE SATYRE OF THE THRIE ESTAITS; Christopher
	Marlowe, DR FAUSTUS; William Shakespeare, RICHARD III, THE
	WINTER'S TALE; Ben Jonson, EVERY MAN IN HIS HUMOUR, THE DEVIL IS
	AN ASS; Richard Brome, THE ANTIPODES; Bertolt Brecht, THE
	RESISTIBLE RISE OF ARTURO UI; John Arden, ARMSTRONG'S LAST
	GOODNIGHT; Tom Stoppard, ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD,
	DOGG'S HAMLET, CAHOOT'S MACBETH; Caryl Churchill, CLOUD NINE.

Arrest at Folger Library

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 167. Thursday, 9 July 1992.
 
From:		Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		July 9, 1992
Subject:	Arrest at Folger Library
 
 
SHAKSPEReans,
 
The article below appeared in last Friday's *WASHINGTON POST*.  It is of
interest for many reasons, especially in that Ex Libris (an electronic
conference like SHAKSPER) played a role in the apprehension of the thief.
 
                                                Hardy M. Cook
                                                This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
==============================================================================
 
                 FBI Arrests Suspect in Folger Theft:
                      Man Accused of Stealing
                     Historical Signed Documents
 
                         By Judith Weinraub
 
 
The FBI has arrested a subject in the theft of four documents from two rare
books at the Folger Shakespeare Library, Folger Director Werner Gundersheimer
said yesterday.  The arrest was made at the Library during its regular teatime
Wednesday.
 
The stolen documents, which have all been located, were apparently taken in
late May or early June from two 19th-century "extra-illustrated" books in the
library's collection, said Gundersheimer.  He estimated their total value at
"not exceeding $20,000."
 
The missing pages are documents (called autographs) signed by historical
figures: Voltaire, Sir Isaac Newton, Sir John Burgoyne and one signed by
Charles II and Samuel Pepys, said Gundersheimer.  In the "extra-illustrated"
manuscript tradition, each autograph had been bound -- scrapbook style -- into
two 19th-century English books ("The Life of David Garrick" by Arthur Murphy
and "Burnet's History of His Own Time" by Gilbert Burnet, bishop of Salisbury,
England) as a commentary or embellishment upon them.
 
"It wasn't a big heist," said Gundersheimer, "but rather a breach of a system
of trust and service to the scholarly community on which institutions like
ours depend."
 
Once the documents' disappearance was discovered, said Gundersheimer, their
speedy relocation was an outstanding example of cooperation among libraries,
dealers and the FBI, with an assist from Ex Libris, a computer-generated
electronic mail system used by libraries.
 
No one had noticed the documents were missing until last week when a
Philadelphia dealer called Gundersheimer with questions about an autograph she
had been offered that she suspected might have come from a Washington library.
 
The Folger staff soon identified it as one of their own, and observed that the
name of the man offering it for sale was the same as that of a man who in late
May had studied the book from which the document was taken.  The man
identified himself to the Folger as an assistant lecturer at Trinity College,
in Cambridge, England.  He told the dealer he was a private collector having
hard times, said Gundersheimer.
 
The Philadelphia dealer immediately contacted other autograph dealers and the
FBI, said Gundersheimer, who then used Ex Libris to notify a number of
libraries that the alleged thief was at large.
 
Last week the man made another appointment with the Philadelphia dealer, said
Gundersheimer, but did not keep it.  A second appointment, which was also no
kept, was made with another Philadelphia dealer.  Both places had been staked
out by the FBI.
 
Then Wednesday the man appeared at the Folger just before 3 p.m.  Initially
Gundersheimer was out of the building at a lunch meeting in Baltimore that had
been delayed by crowds at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.  The Folger 's
registrar recognized the suspect's name and notified her supervisor, Betty
Walsh, the head of the Reading Room.
 
"When I came back just after 3, my office had turned into a command post,"
said Gundersheimer.  "By 3:30 the suspect was in handcuffs. . . .  Our staff
reacted with enormous professionalism and coolness."
 
"The suspect, who was charged with transporting stolen goods across state
lines, was described by Gundersheimer as 54, with curly grayish hair, a
mustache and glasses.  FBI investigators could not be reached yesterday to
confirm the identity.
 
"The courts have tended to look at this kind of thing as a victimless crime,"
said Gundersheimer.  "But it is an assault on the national patrimony, and
there <f t=i>are</f> victims -- the dealers who get badly burned, the
collectors whose hopes have been aroused, the institutions from which the
thefts are made and the generations of scholars who must anticipate working
under a totally different kind of security.
 
"It's a case of all's well that ends well."
 
 
THE WASHINGTON POST, Friday, July 3, 1992, D1, D11.

Wisconsin Shakespeare Festival 1992 Season

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 165. Tuesday, 7 July 1992.
 
From: 		TOM LOUGHLIN <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, July 7, 1992, 01:14:00 -0400
Subject: 	Wisconsin Shakespeare Festival 1992 Season
 
     The Wisconsin Shakespeare Festival announces the opening of its 1992
season.  This season the WSF will present *The Merchant of Venice*, *Pericles,
Prince of Tyre*, and *King Lear* in rotating repertory.  The Wisconsin
Shakespeare Festival is a non-union professional company performing in the
Center for the Arts on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville.
The season opened on July 3 with *Merchant*.  *Pericles* opens July 8,
followed by *King Lear* on July 10.  The season runs in rotating rep until
August 8.
 
The casting is as follows:
 
*The Merchant of Venice*
 
The Duke of Venice...........................................Stanton Davis
The Prince of Morocco........................................Stanton Davis
The Prince of Arragon.........................................Robert Olsen
Antonio, a merchant of Venice.................................Tim Gregory*
Bassanio, his friend, a suitor to Portia....................Steven Koehler
Friends to Antonio and Bassanio
   Solanio...................................................Daniel Teeter
   Salerio.....................................................Jason Novak
   Gratiano...............................................Steven Dallimore
Lorenzo, in love with Jessica.............................William O'Connor
Shylock, a rich Jew...........................................Tom Loughlin
Tubal, a Jew, his friend....................................Lorenzo Molina
Launcelot Gobbo, servant to Shylock...........................Nate Biddick
Old Gobbo, father to Launcelot................................Robert Olsen
Leonardo, servant to Bassanio..................................Paul Angelo
Stephano, servant to Portia....................................Mike Willis
 
Portia, an heiress........................................Elizabeth Heflin
Nerissa, her waiting gentlewoman.............................Carol Johnson
Jessica, daughter to Shylock..............................Jessica Marlowe*
 
Directed by Michael Duncan
Costumes by Robin E. Murray
Scenic and Lighting Design by Jim Trenberth
Music by William Penn
Production Stage Manager - Lisa Flegel
 
*Pericles, Prince of Tyre*
 
Gower.........................................................Robert Olsen
 
ANTIOCH
  Antiochus..................................................Stanton Davis
  Daughter of Antiochus......................................Carol Johnson
  Thaliard.....................................................Paul Angelo
TYRE
  Pericles..................................................Steven Koehler
  Helicanus....................................................Tom Loughin
  Lords....................Jason Novak, William O'Connor, Steven Dallimore
THARSUS
  Cleon......................................................Stanton Davis
  Dionyza.................................................Jessica Marlowe*
  Leonine...................................................Lorenzo Molina
  Lord.......................................................Daniel Teeter
PENTAPOLIS
  Simonides................................................Michael Duncan*
  Thaisa..................................................Elizabeth Heflin
  Marina.....................................................Carol Johnson
  Lychorida..................................................Carol Johnson
  Fisherman....................Tom Loughlin, William O'Connor, Paul Angelo
EPHESUS
  Cerimon.....................................................Tim Gregory*
  The Goddess Diana.......................................Jessica Marlowe*
MYTILENE
  Pandar......................................................Tom Loughlin
  Bawd....................................................Elizabeth Heflin
  Boult...................................................William O'Connor
  Lysimachus..............................................Steven Dallimore
 
     The members of the company also play various lords, knights, etc.
 
Directed by Thomas P. Collins
Costumes by Wendy W. Collins
Scenic and Lighting Design by Jim Trenberth
Original Music by Alaric Rokko Jans
Sound Design by Robert Neuhaus
Choreography by Elizabeth Heflin
Production Stage Manager - Lisa Flegel
 
*King Lear*
 
Lear, King of Britian.....................................Michael Duncan*
King of France................................................Jason Novak
Duke of Burgandy..............................................Paul Angelo
Duke of Cornwall, Regan's husband........................Steven Dallimore
Duke of Albany, Goneril's husband..........................Lorenzo Molina
Earl of Kent................................................Stanton Davis
Earl of Gloucester...........................................Tom Loughlin
Edgar, Gloucester's son....................................Steven Koehler
Edmund, Gloucester's bastard son.............................Tim Gregory*
Curan, a courtier...........................................Daniel Teeter
Old Man, Gloucester's servant.................................Jason Novak
Doctor...................................................Steven Dallimore
The Fool.....................................................Robert Olsen
Oswald, Goneril's steward................................William O'Connor
Lear's Knight.................................................Mike Willis
 
Lear's Daughters
  Goneril................................................Elizabeth Heflin
  Regan..................................................Jessica Marlowe*
  Cordelia..................................................Carol Johnson
 
Servants, Messengers, Soldiers....Paul Angelo, Nate Biddick, Jason Novak,
     Daniel Teeter
 
Directed by Thomas S. Goltry
Costumes by Wendy W. Collins
Scenic and Lighting Design by Jim Trenberth
Music by William Penn
Fight Direction by Tim Gregory
Production Stage Manager - Lisa Flegel
 
         *Member, Actor's Equity Association
 
   -----------------------------------------------------------------------
For further information, write or call:
 
   Wisconsin Shakespeare Festival
   Center for the Arts
   University of Wisconsin-Platteville
   Platteville, WI 53818
   608-342-1298
 
Tom Loughlin
Wisconsin Shakespeare Festival
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Wanamaker Globe Project

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 166. Tuesday, 7 July 1992.
 
From: 		Stephen Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, July 7, 1992, 18:42:49 BST
Subject: 	GLOBES ONE and TWO
 
It is pretty well known, as Jay L. Halio remarks, that more information
survives about the Second Globe than the First.  (The Hollar drawing is of
the later structure.) But the Wanamaker Globe project on the South Bank that
I mentioned in my recent note is definitely aiming to reconstruct the First
Globe.  I have just consulted Philip Ormond of the Rose Theatre Trust who
telephoned Pentagram, the architects for the "new" Globe to confirmed this.
They aim to solve the problem of the combustibility of the thatch with "an
embedded sprinkler system and chemical treatment of the straw."  The First
Globe was the one with which Shakespeare was most closely associated, and I
assume that this reason lies behind the decision to attempt to rebuild it, if
funding arrives.
 
Stephen Miller
UDLE031 @ UK.AC.KCL.CC.OAK

C. L. Barber

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 164. Tuesday, 7 July 1992.
 
From: 		Stephen Orgel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, July 6, 1992, 11:31:21 PDT
Subject:	RE: Shk 3.0162
 
Re. Piers Lewis's query, if Cesar Barber is C.L. Barber (alias "Joe"), he
died several years ago--and if anyone has an e-mail address for him, I'd
like to have it too: I have LOTS to talk with him about.
 
Cheers,
 
Stephen Orgel (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

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