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Home :: Archive :: 1992 :: November ::
Comments on Research Proposal
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 310. Sunday, 8 November 1992.
 
(1)	From: 	Kay Stockholder <
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	Date: 	Sunday, Nov. 8, 1992, 09:25:38 PST
	Subj: 	SHK 3.0306  Research Proposal for Comments
 
(2)	From: 	Lars Engle <
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	Date: 	Sunday, Nov. 8, 1992, 14:33:51 CST
	Subj: 	RE:SHK 3.0306  Research Proposal for Comments
 
(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		Kay Stockholder <
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Date: 		Sunday, Nov. 8, 1992, 09:25:38 PST
Subject: Research Proposal for Comments
Comment: 	SHK 3.0306  Research Proposal for Comments
 
An interesting idea. One can take kings in Shakespeare's plays as
representative of coming to manhood, whether or not the plays function
ritualistically. I mean, to be a king is to be autonomous, as only a king can
be in that society. Therefore it can easily represent adult autonomy in our
society, where one can become adult before one's father is dead.
 
(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
From: 		Lars Engle <
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Date: 		Sunday, Nov. 8, 1992, 14:33:51 CST
Subject: Research Proposal for Comments
Comment: 	RE:SHK 3.0306  Research Proposal for Comments
 
In response to Sean Lawrence:  The "breeching" ceremony, which in aristocratic
and gentle households seemed to involve giving a male child a sword as well as
shifting his attire from something resembling a modern skirt to something
resembling modern trousers, may count as a masculine coming-of-age ritual.  See
Lawrence Stone, _The Family, Sex and Marriage_, abridged edition, p. 258, where
this practice is described in C17 and C18 households and called "a critically
important _rite de passage_."  Shakespeare seems to allude to it when Leontes
says, "Looking on the lines / Of my boy's face, methoughts I did recoil /
Twenty-three years, and saw myself unbreech'd, / In my green velvet coat . .
."(1.2.153).   Daggers unmannerly breech'd in gore seem also to allude to this
kind of coming-of-age process.
 
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