1992

Re: Shakespeare on PBS (Frontline)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 407. Thursday, 31 December 1992.
 
From:           John Mucci <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 28 Dec 92 17:06:00 UT
Subject:        RE: Shakespeare on PBS (Frontline)
 
With regard to Ronald Dwelle's comment on the *Frontline* program
on the Authorship Issue, I must admit it was not entirely
successful in its method of presentation. In no way, however, was
the show meant to be a "debate." It would have been a marvellous
idea to have Rowse, Schoenbaum, Ogburn, and Powell interacting;
but the method of intercutting interviews always gives the
appearance of being one-sided.
 
Having produced a three-hour live program this year on the
Authorship which did have taped segments as well as a live debate
Moderated by William F. Buckley, Jr., I can tell you that it is
extremely difficult to present a balanced view on the subject. It
is also difficult to separate the crusade or fringe factions
which can discredit any topic. Yet there is a core of great
interest in the subject pursued by some dedicated scholars
working with primary documents, worthy of regard by any of us
with a passion for Elizabethan history and literature. The
Authorship Question has, I know, alienated some but has created an
intense curiosity in the Works of Shakespeare themselves, which
is certainly part of our jobs as teachers, and just as much a
topic for discussion as, say, Mel Gibson's performance in
*Hamlet,* but in no way should it be deemed "foolishness."
 
Life is full of parallels and coincidences, and some of the
parallels of Oxford's life and work may be nothing more than
that--coincidence--when compared with the works of Shakespeare.
But when the coincidences tally into the hundreds and hundreds,
you have to stop and think there might be something in all this.

Q: Branagh *Ado*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 406. Thursday, 31 December 1992.
 
From:           Mike Lomonico <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 26 Dec 92 16:04
Subject: 3.0396  Shakespeare Films
Comment:        Re: SHK 3.0396  Shakespeare Films
 
Does anyone know when Kenneth Branagh's film of Much Ado is opening in
the U.S.?  It was finished last Fall, but I haven't heard anything about
it since.  It stars Denzel Washington, Keanu Reeves, Michael Keaton, Emma
Thompson and Branagh.  I know he's busy playing Hamlet in London as I
write this, but I hope we will be able to see it soon.
 
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> ----------------- 40.41N, 73.32W
Mike Lomonico
K-12 Teacher at Farmingdale High School,  Farmingdale   Farmingdale, NY

RE: Shakespeare on PBS (Frontline)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 404. Wednesday, 23 December 1992.
 
From:           Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 23 Dec 92 08:30:45 EST
Subject: RE: Shakespeare on PBS (Frontline)
Comment:        SHK 3.0403  RE: Shakespeare on PBS (Frontline)
 
          I had missed the first showing of the Frontline authorship
          "debate," and so set aside last evening to savor it.
 
          What a travesty. If there were any serious Oxfordians, it's
          hard to see how they could survive such a show. And what a
          lousy case presented for the Stratfordians.
 
         Perhaps the show will mark an end to this foolishness! ?

MLA Hiatus

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 405. Saturday, 26 December 1992.
 
From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, December 26, 1992
Subject:        MLA Hiatus
 
Dear SHAKSPEReans,
 
SHAKSPER, as one would expect, is encountering the usual seasonal slowdown,
which will be compounded by my attending the MLA Convention in New York
from Sunday through Wednesday.  During that time, there will be no SHAKSPER
mailing; however, should you wish to submit a posting, please go ahead
(I have disk space of about the size of Utah, so your submissions will
be safely stored until I can get them out to everyone late Wednesday).
 
For those who will also be attending the MLA Convention, let me
recommend Session 362: Electronic Archives (Tuesday, from 10:15 to
11:30 a.m., Riverside Suite, Sheraton New York).  At this session,
Professor Ian Lancashire of the Univeristy of Toronto will be discussing
"The Public Domain Shakespeare."
 
Best wishes for the season to all.
 
                        Hardy M. Cook
                      Editor of SHAKSPER

RE: Shakespeare on PBS (Frontline)

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 403. Tuesday, 22 December 1992.
 
From:           Tad Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Dec 92 09:18:01 -0500
Subject: 3.0398  Shakespeare on PBS (Frontline)
Comment:        RE: SHK 3.0398  Shakespeare on PBS (Frontline)
 
>Frontline: Examines the possibility that works attributed to William
>Shakespeare were written instead by Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of
>Oxford.
 
Interesting use of evidence in that program. If I remember correctly,
that's the one where they briefly mention an objection to Oxford's
candidacy: "He died in 1604, and at least one [!!!!????] of Shakespeare's
plays appeared after that date." Somebody drop an aught somewhere?
 
I saved it on tape because it shows Schoenbaum and Rowse in action
(unfortunately, not against each other -- THAT would be a treat); and
because the interviews with Ogburn reveal more about Ogburn than he
probably intended.
 
Tad Davis
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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