1992

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 363. Thursday, 10 December 1992.
 
(1)     From:   Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Dec 92 08:39:14 EST
        Subj:   SHK 3.0361  Shakespeare as Himself
 
(2)     From:   Rasa Hollender <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Dec 1992 14:02 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 3.0361  Shakespeare as Himself
 
(3)     From:   John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Dec 1992 15:17 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 3.0361  Shakespeare as Himself
 
(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Dec 92 08:39:14 EST
Subject: Shakespeare as Himself
Comment:        SHK 3.0361  Shakespeare as Himself
 
          I think it's fair to say that Shakespeare never speaks in
          his own voice. Or perhaps he always speaks in his multiple
          voices.
 
          Ron Dwelle (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at Internet)
 
(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rasa Hollender <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Dec 1992 14:02 EST
Subject: 3.0361  Shakespeare as Himself
Comment:        Re: SHK 3.0361  Shakespeare as Himself
 
In answer to Carian Mathwig's question about Shakespeare's speaking in
his own voice: in *Winter's Tale*, Act 4.1.1-32, it seems that Shakespeare
is speaking through the Chorus to his contemporary critics, who, during this
neo-classical genre of writing, criticized Shakespeare's lack of unity
of time, specifically in the *Winter's Tale*.
 
*Winter's Tale* takes place over a time period of 16 years, obviously
not following the neoclassical ideal of unity of time.
 
The chorus says in his lines :
 
        Now take upon me [the playwright can be substituted here], in the name
        of Time,
        To use my wings.  Impute it not a crime
        To me or my swift passage, that I slide
        O'er sixteen years and leave growth untried
        Of that wide gap, since it is in my power [as the playwright]
        To o'erthrow law [neo-classical ideal] and in one self-born hour
        To plant and o'erwhelm custom. . . .
        etc. and he goes on . . .
 
Picking apart this passage, evidence is found supporting that this
is Shakespeare commenting to the audience.
 
Also, Puck's ending speech in *Midsummer's*  can also be Shakespeare's
voice directing comment to the audience.
 
Also, in *Tempest*, though I don't know what lines, someone comments about
how these events in the play happened over a span of three hours (the
running time of the play), and perhaps this is Shakespear's blatant way of
saying "o.k. THIS time I followed unity of time, so HA!"
 
I can expand more if you wish.....
 
Rasa Hollender
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)--------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Dec 1992 15:17 EST
Subject: 3.0361  Shakespeare as Himself
Comment:        Re: SHK 3.0361  Shakespeare as Himself
 
The most compelling evidence for Shakespeare speaking as himself is the
Chorus of Time at the beginning of Act 4 in *The Winter's Tale*.  The first
person singular applies both to time and the playwright, especially if one
considers the way Shakespeare combines both medieval dramatic tradition and
neo-classical demands for sophistication and coherence.  David Young has a
nice explication of the speech in *The Heart's Forest*.
 
John Cox

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