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Home :: Archive :: 1992 :: December ::
Rs: Doubling; Private Idaho; Directors' Rights;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 381. Monday, 14 December 1992.
 
(1)     From:   John Mucci <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Dec 92 19:57:00 UT
        Subj:   Doubling Response
 
(2)     From:   Patricia Gallagher <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Dec 1992 18:00:17 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   My Own Private Idaho
 
(3)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Dec 92 19:25:18 EST
        Subj:   Re: Visual Style for *Lear*; Actresses; Directors' Rights
 
(4)     From:   John Mucci <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Dec 92 19:59:00 UT
        Subj:   Rosencrantz, et al.
 
 
(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Mucci <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Dec 92 19:57:00 UT
Subject:        Doubling Response
 
In response to Don Rowan's inquiry about doubling, there is a monograph
written by Arthur Colby Sprague (1966) entitled THE DOUBLING OF PARTS IN
SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYS, which treats, I'd say exhaustively -- the subject, from
the viewpoint of the theatre managers in Britain. I'd be happy to help someone
get hold of a copy if they had difficulty finding one.
 
John Mucci
Director, VisNet (800-828-3465)
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Gallagher <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Dec 1992 18:00:17 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        My Own Private Idaho
 
In an article about director Gus Van Sant ("Premiere" October 1991, P. 33-7),
it is stated that "My Own Private Idaho" is "a plot lifted from Shakespeare's
*Henry IV*" While the article does explain the origin of the title of the
film, it does not explain WHY the character played by River Phoenix is
narcoleptic. (The title "refers in part to the imaginative realm of its
narcoleptic hero")
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Dec 92 19:25:18 EST
Subject:        Re: Visual Style for *Lear*; Actresses; Directors' Rights
 
The issue of directors' rights has taken an ominous turn in relation to
cross-gender casting as Samuel French now inserts in its texts for production
a proviso that the gender of a character must be played by an actor of that
gender, or words to that defect, unless specific permission is obtained in
advance.  Oh, the joys of literary property and theatrical production . . .
 
On a separate note, the Folger Library owns many of the costumes from the Peter
Brook LEAR, They sit somewhere in the vaults, but they were brought out for
display at a recent NEH-Folger Library workshop for secondary school teachers.
I hulked around for a few minutes wearing the immense fur collar that turns the
king into a grim vulture in the opening part of the movie.
 
                Steve Urkowitz, SURCC@CUNYVM
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Mucci <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Dec 92 19:59:00 UT
Subject:        Rosencrantz, et al.
 
I am doing some research on a manuscript found in the British Museum, written
about 1582 by Perigrine Bertie. As Ambassador to Denmark he left certain
correspondence referring to several members of the Privy Council, among whom
were gentlemen by the name of Rosenkrantz and Guildenstern.
 
I would like to know, especially from anyone on line from Denmark, whether
these are historical personages of any note, and in general, whether the names
Rosenkrantz and Guildenstern were common ones in the late 16th century.
 
John Mucci
Director, VisNet
 

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