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Home :: Archive :: 1992 :: December ::
Rs: Actresses; Directors's Rights
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 389. Wednesday, 16 December 1992.
 
(1)     From:   Laurie E. Osborne <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Dec 92 14:32:25 -0500
        Subj:   [Re: Actresses]
 
(2)     From:   Laurie E. Osborne <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Dec 92 14:26:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re:  SHK 3.0368  More Rs: Mel Gibson *H
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laurie E. Osborne <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Dec 92 14:32:25 -0500
Subject:        Re:  Visual Style for *Lear*; Actresses; Directors' Rights
 
Re: Actresses
 
I THINK the author's name for *The First English Actresses* is Elizabeth Howe.
 
Laurie Osborne
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laurie E. Osborne <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Dec 92 14:26:15 -0500
Subject: 3.0368  More Rs: Mel Gibson *H
Comment:        Re:  SHK 3.0368  More Rs: Mel Gibson *H
 
In response to Jon Enriquez's comments about the director's rights and the
different "works" of staged/filmed Shakespeare as opposed to the text, I
would like to point out that many directoral choices find their way into
texts. The nineteenth century published an enormous number of acting/
performance editions which cut and rearrange Shakespeare's text at will.
We are not just talaking about *Hamlet* here. I am currently working on
the multiple texts of *Twelfth Night* which was cut and rearranged in
a variety of ways during the period. My question is two fold: are these
editions which record performance choices (and I would include videotexts
as performance editions) really completely different works? It seems to me
that these are versions of *Hamlet* or *Twelfth Night* or whatever but
there is some basis for comparing them as versions rather than totally
distinct works. If so, how would we define that basis? It certainly is not
a "fixed text" or is it?
 
Laurie E. Osborne

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