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Home :: Archive :: 1992 :: December ::
(no subject)
PUT SHAKS-08 BIOGRAFY SHAKSPER PW=BERNSHAW
 
 
 S H A K S P E R
 Shakespeare Electronic Conference
 
 Member Biographies -- Volume 10
 
===============================================================================
*Kiernander, Adrian
 
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My name and various addresses are below. I am a senior lecturer in the Drama
Section of the English Department. I am both a writer and director (and, in the
past, actor). My Shakespeare productions include Hamlet and A Midsummer
Night's Dream, in Auckland and Wellington, New Zealand, respectively and The
Tempest in Brisbane. I have also directed the Nikolai opera of The Merry Wives
of Windsor at the Queensland Conservatorium of Music.
 
I have written fairly extensively about Ariane Mnouchkine and the Theatre du
Soleil, having worked with the company for a year in 1985, and a book on her
work, which includes a study of her so-called Kabuki Shakespeare cycle is due
out with Cambridge University Press early next year. I am also a member of the
Australian and New Zealand Shakespeare Association and gave a paper at the
conference earlier in the year entitled "Prospero's Island of the Dead:
Strindberg's The Ghost Sonata as a source for The Tempest." This is due to be
published shortly, but I'll see if the publishers mind it being lodged
electronically with SKAKSPER.
 
My major current research interest is a study of the career of a well-known
Australian director and actor John Bell who currently heads his own Shakespeare
Company. I worked with him as an assistant director on his production of
Richard III earlier this year, and hope to start serious work on the book over
the Christmas break.
 
I am leaving for a six-month study leave shortly, and will be directing a
production of The Two Gentlemen of Verona for the Wellington Summer
Shakespeare, which I founded 11 years ago, in New Zealand.
 
===============================================================================
*Enriquez, Jon
 
<
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My name is Jon Enriquez and I am very interested in joining SHAKSPER.
Please accept this as my autobiographical statement.
 
My professional identity is Assistant Director, Academic Affairs and
Admissions, The Graduate School, Georgetown University.  I am a U.S.
historian by training and a theater person by avocation.  My primary
interests in Shakespeare are those of a director, actor, and producer.
I held Shakespeare at arm's length for many years, largely because
it's taught so poorly in our high schools.  Once I started acting in
his plays, however, I was immediately captivated.  His work is so easy
for an actor (and director) to understand and play.  He is a joy to
perform.
 
I do not have any works-in-progress to report; the closest I've come
to something scholarly on Shakespeare is a short "who-struck-
Gloucester" piece I did on the known historical facts surrounding
the events in Richard II, for use in a production.  As an academic/
intellectual, however, I frequently read and use scholarly takes on
the Bard for purposes of performance.
 
I look forward to participating in SHAKSPER.  My addresses are
           Bitnet:        ENRIQUEZJ@guvax
           Internet:      
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           US Mail:       302 ICC
                          Georgetown University
                          Washington, DC  20057
 
==============================================================================
*Sponberg, Arvid F.
 
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                        Arvid F. Sponberg
                        English Department
                        Valparaiso University
                        Valparaiso, IN 46383
Tel: 219-464-5100
Fax: 219-464-5496
 
        Here is the requested biographical information: I am a professor
of English at Valparaiso University in Indiana. I teach modern drama and
write about the history of American playwriting. One of my models has been
Gerald Eades Bently's THE PROFESSION OF PLAYWRIGHT IN SHAKESPEARE'S TIME.
I want to write something similar for American playwriting. Though I am
presently working on mid-twentieth century playwrights, I am moving
into the nineteenth century when the influence of Shakespeare and the
English forms of theater organization were extremely strong. Consequently,
I believe that I would benefit from regular conversation with scholars
knowledgeable about Elizabethan playwrights and theaters.
        I have published one book: BROADWAY TALKS: What Professionals
Think About Commercial Theater in America (Greenwoood, 1991); I am com-
pleting a second: A.R. Gurney: A Casebook (Garland, 1993). Both books
address problems arising from the interactions of artistic and management
decison-making.
        I have taught Shakespeare while I was director of my university's
overseas study center in Cambridge, England from 1977-79 and have played
the part of the Gravedigger in a university production of HAMLET.
        My degrees are from Augustana College (IL), the University of
Chicago, and the University of Michigan where I wrote my dissertation on
J.M. Synge and the manner in which he adapted his plays to the talents
of the original Abbey Theater company.
        I focused on Irish Theater for about ten years. I became interested
in Frank and Willie Fay, who were themselves vitally interested in Shakespeare,
and delivered a paper at a Midwest American Committee for Irish Studies
meeting entitled "Frank Fay and Modern Acting".  However, purusing research
in Ireland became financially impossible and I switched my attention to the
development of American playwriting. I am now the editor of the newsletter
of the American Theatre and Drama Society. ATDS has about 200 members and
is a constituent body of the Association for Theater in Higher Education.
Within ATDS, I am chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee on Promptbooks. The
committee is currently surveying principal theatre collections in the
US and Canada to get some idea of the scope, depth, and accessibility
of promptbooks. We need to do this as a first step in a plan to determine
the feasibility of establishing, eventually, a promptbook cataloging
network. Such a network would link theaters, libraries, and scholars
in an effort to better understand and preserve the foundational documents
of theater history.
 
=============================================================================
*Wolf, Janet S.
 
<WOLF@SNYCORVA>
 
        I received my B.A. and M.A. from the University of California at
Berkeley, and Ph.D. at Syracuse University.  My Ph.D. is in Restoration and
eighteenth century literature.  I have taught at Syracuse University,
Le Moyne College, St. Lawrence University, and the College of William and
Mary.  I am an Assistant Professor at SUNY College at Cortland.
        I taught Shakespeare at Le Moyne College, which requires all
students, even non-English majors, to take a semester of Shakespeare
before graduating.  At SUNY Cortland, I teach Shakespeare, Restoration and
eighteenth century, general literature courses, and freshman writing.
        I have written two articles on Shakespeare.  "Like an Old Tale
Still": Paulina, Triple Hecate, and the Persephone Myth in The Winter's Tale"
will appear in Images of Persephone in Literature, edited by Elizabeth
T. Hayes, University of Florida Press, 1994.  An article on a 1705
Italian opera version of the Hamlet sory has been presented at the New
York College English Association and will be presented again at the
South Central Society for Eighteenth Century Studies in Baton Rouge,
Louisiana, in March.
        My research interests, in addition to Shakespeare, are the
plays of John Gay, baroque opera, anti-Walpole satire, drinking and
alcoholism in literature, and Restoration and eighteenth century women
playwrights.
 
===============================================================================
*Bonahue, Edward T.
<
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Edward T. Bonahue, Jr., was graduated with a B.A. from Wake Forest
University in 1987 in English literature and subsequently was
employed by the Folger Shakespeare Library as managing editor of
*Shakespeare Quarterly.*  He is now a doctoral candidate at the
University of North Carolina, where he has studied with Alan
Dessen, S. K. Henninger, Darryl Gless, and Ritchie Kendall.  Although
his M.A. thesis addresses power and politics in recent work of
Harold Pinter, his hopes to write a dissertation on dramatic repre-
sentations of the market and marketplace in Renaissance, especially
Stuart, drama.  He has articles pending at several journals on
William Baldwin, Spenser, and Shakespeare's *Henry V.*  He is a
member of MLA and SAMLA.
 
===============================================================================
*Paul, John Steven
 
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I am associate prof. and chairman of the Theatre and Television Arts Dept. at
Valparaiso University.  This spring I will be directing King Lear for the
University Theatre.  I also direct a program called the Young Actors
Shakespeare Workshop, a program of Shakespearean acting and production for
young people, age 8-18.
 
 
===============================================================================
*Precosky, Dan
 
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I am not a Shakespeare specialist but I am an interested amateur.  My primary
field is modern Canadian poetry.  I work at a small community college in
Northern British Columbia and look to electronic discussions groups such as
SHAKESPER as a means of overcoming the cultural isolation that a northern
location creates.
 
        Don Precosky
        English Dept.
        College of New Caledonia
        Prince George, B.C. Canada
        V2N 1P8
 
        PhD University of New Brunswick 1979
 
===============================================================================
*Rogers, Judith K.
 
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I am Judith K. Rogers, Assistant Professor of English at the Ohio State
University.  I have done papers and articles on Shakespeare and his text,
and I am one of the editors of the New Variorum +Titus Andronicus+.
 
===============================================================================
*Mucci, John C.
 
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                                John C. Mucci
                            Director, VisNet East
                           GTE Service Corporation
                   One Stamford Forum, Stamford, CT 06904
                             203-965-4314 direct
                              203-965-2463 fax
                    1-800-828-3465 toll-free & voice mail
-----------------------------------------------------------------
BA English, Carnegie-Mellon U. MA Educational Media, Fairfield U.
 
At present, am responsible for the development of a satellite
network for a company primarily concerned with business
television programming. Aside from this, Shakespeare's works are
a great passion in life, and has formed much of the study
undertaken in undergraduate, post-graduate, and continuing
artistic endeavors.
 
Have taught (English, Scriptwriting, Video Production, Electronic
Media) at Sacred Heart U (Bridgeport, CT); Fairfield U
(Fairfield, CT), and Allegheny Community College (Pittsburgh,
PA).
 
Am in the preliminary stages of working with the Folger Library
to present their method of educating students about the works of
Shakespeare via CD-ROM, DVI, and satellite broadcasts.
 
Recently produced and directed a 3-hour interactive videocon-
ference moderated by William F. Buckley, Jr, with a panel of
eminent Shakespeare scholars, discussing the Shakespeare
Authorship Question, which was offered to schools nation-wide.
The videotape made from this conference is available in 2-hour
and 3-hour versions, through our 800-number. I am also willing to
share relevant portions of hard-copy transcripts of the various
interviews (which total 15 hours of videotape) of nationally
known scholars and celebrities such as Earl Hyman, David
Bevington, and Fr Joseph Edwards, SJ.
 
Am interested in many aspects of Shakespeare studies; have read
literally hundreds of books on the subject and am willing to open
my library (or research therefrom) to others.
 
==============================================================================
*Adler, Elhanan
 
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Actually, I am not a Shakespearean but a librarian, specializing in computer
applications to libraries and information retrieval.
 
My interest in SHAKSPER is due to an interdepartmental graduate course which
I teach entitled: "The computer as a research tool in the humanities".
 
This year I decided to include a discussion of listservers and electronic
discussion groups in the course. In order to illustrate the possibilities
inherent in this technology I am trying to subscribe for a short period
of time to several potentially interesting lists, in various disciplines.
 
I would greatly appreciate if you would be good enough to add my name to
the list for a week or so, or alternately, to send me some samples of the
current "traffic".
 
==============================================================================
*Cochran, Charles
 
Cochran <
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I am a brand-new student in the graduate English program at the
University of Georgia. I'm also a long-time newspaperman, currently
holding down a copy editor's position on the local daily.
 
On the academic side, I'm enrolled in a course in 16th century English
literature. Of course, we're touching on a great many of Shakespeare's
contemporaries. Our dealings with The Man himself are limited to a
discussion of the sonnets. (The plays, of course, are covered in one or
two other courses which I haven't taken yet, though I _did_ take two or
three such classes as an undergraduate 10 or 15 years ago.)
 
I'm afraid I won't have much, at least at first, to add to the
discussion. However, I'd appreciate the opportunity to listen and
perhaps contribute occasionally.
 
==============================================================================
*Moss, Grant
 
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I am a Ph.D candidate in English literature at the University of North
Carolina.  At present, I have no publications on Shakespeare, but I am
interested in writing a dissertation on Renaissance drama and would therefore
be very interested in the SHAKSPER list.  My address and phone are:
                        215 Chateau Apts
                        Carrboro, NC 27510
                        919-967-7143.
 
==============================================================================
*Youngberg, Karin
 
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          Karin Youngberg
          Department of English
          Augustana College
          
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I am a University of Iowa Ph.D (1969) and have taught
Shakespeare to undergraduates for 20 years at Augustana College (IL).
I have spent a summer studying Performance Criticism with J. L.
Styan as part of an NEH Workshop.  Although I have not published in
the Shakespeare area, my special interests are the semiotics of
theater, the phenomenology of theater, and, of course, performance
criticism.  I am interested in all aspects of these subjects, but I
particularly spend a lot of time thinking about how these
theoretical perspectives can be used in the classroom. If you believe
this qualifies me for your list, I would very much like to be a part
of the conversation.
 
===============================================================================
*O'Malley, Lurana
 
<
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LURANA DONNELS O'MALLEY
Assistant Professor
Department of Theatre and Dance
1770 East-West Rd.
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96822
w. 808-956-9609 Pacific Time
FAX 808-956-4234
 
EDUCATION:
BA      University of Virginia  Drama/English
MA      University of Texas at Austin   Theatre History and Criticism
PhD     University of Texas at Austin   Theatre History and Criticism
 
Dissertation topic: Commedia dell'arte and the early twentieth century
Russian avante-garde
 
Have published in: Theatre Studies, Theatre Insight, Theatre Journal,
American Drama 1945-Present, Slavic Review, Soviet and East European
Performance
 
Professional memberships: Women and Theatre Program, Association for
Theatre in Higher Education, American Society for Theatre Research
 
Current interests: Contemporary Russian theatre, contemporary American
women playwrights, Russian and Soviet drama of the 20th century
 
=============================================================================
*Bryson, Rhett
 
<BRYSON@FRMNVAX1.bitnet>
 
I am Rhett Bryson, Professor of Drama at Furman University in Greenville, SC.
Mailing Address:
Department of Drama
Furman University
Greenville, SC 29613-0426
(803) 294-2126
(803) 294-3509 FAX
Undergraduate B.A. from Florida State University
M.F.A. from The University of Georgia
 
I serve as scenic and lighting designer for the department and as technical
director for the productions. I teach classes in these areas as well. The most
exciting teaching experience of my career is the "Ideas In The Arts" course
that I helped design and have taught for the last 15 years. It is an
interdisciplinary class in Art, Music & Drama. A professor from each of the
subject areas is in the class and contributes each day.
 
I am involved at the present time with a major research project which is
attempting to photo document scenic painting techniques in scenic backdrops
painted from 1900-1950's. The only remaining repository of this type of scenic
art is found in Masonic Temples all across the country. A photo illustrated
handbook of techniques to assist with the teaching of the painting techniques
should result from this project.
 
I am especially interested in issues related to the staging and lighting of the
classics - including Shakespeare's works. I have been an actor, designer and
director for Shakespearian productions for over 25 years.
 
===============================================================================
*West, Katherine
 
<
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376 Davenport Road
Toronto, Ontario
CANADA   M4V 1B4
(416) 515-9172

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
        I am a third year graduate student at the University of
        Toronto.  I am doing my thesis on adaptations of Shakespearean
        comedies from 1660-1740 with Alexander Leggatt.  My research
        interests include Shakespearean adaptations, Shakespeare in
        eighteenth-century culture, and Restoration and eighteenth-century
        theatre history.  I recently gave a paper at the Canadian
        Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference in
        Newfoundland on Johnson's edition of _Henry V_ and modern
        editorial practice.  I will be attending the SAA conference in
        Atlanta this spring and will be participating in the
        _Shakespeare and Popular Culture_ session.
 
        I am originally from Atlanta, Georgia.  I did my BA at Florida
        State University in English and in Music (cello), and my MA is
        from Toronto.
 
===============================================================================
*Tawiah-Boateng, John Kwame
 
<
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My full name is John Kwame Tawiah-Boateng, and I am a
graduate student in the English Department of Dalhousie
University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
     My postal address is 2155 Monastery Lane, Appt. #110,
Halifax, N.S., B3H, 4P9, and my home telephone number is (902)
429 8617.  I did my undergraduate studies in English and French
at the University of Ghana, Legon, in Accra, and Dakar University
in Senegal.  My honors undergraduate dissertation was on The
Theory and Practice of T.S. Eliot's Drama (about 100 pages).
After a brief teaching spell at St. Peter's Secondary School in
Ghana, I lived in Ivory Coast where I worked as a translator and
news monitor first with the News Agency of Nigeria and then with
the U.S. Broadcast Information Service.  I also worked as a part-
time news monitor and stringer for the Reuters News Agency for 8
years.  I hope that the above biographical information is
adequate, otherwise I will be prepared to supply any other
information that may be deemed necessary.
     Shakespearan, and indeed Renaissance Studies at large,
constitute an area of great interest to me, and my current areas
of focus are Gender and Textual Studies.  While I do not have any
item handy to present immediately, I am working on a major
research paper which is due next March, on Hysteria in
Shakespeare's Female Characters -- actually it is basically
Shakespeare with some Webster, and I will provide an update as
the work progresses.  I will be happy to provide the List with a
copy as soon as the paper has been completed and used for its
basic purpose in my seminar.
     I am very keen to put across some ideas of interest and
questions to other SHAKSPER members as soon as you confirm my
membership.
 
===============================================================================
*Blaser, Paul
 
<
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Paul Blaser
MA candidate
Dept. of English
State University of New York College @ Oneonta
 
I'm thinking about what to do for my thesis. One question that's bugged me for
a while may serve as a jumping-off point. Why do the three roman plays take
place at the two major transitional points in Roman history? Coriolanus occurs
at the transition between the monarchy and the republic, and J.C. & Antony are
set at the transition from republic to the empire period.
 
Less specifically, I love to read Shakespeare; I love to talk about
Shakespeare; I love to listen to people talk about Shakespeare.
 
Also, I have a friend who is working on his dissertation on tragedy. He is
using Shakespeare's mature tragedies as his primary examples. He is vaguely
technophobic and I would like to use this list to lure him into an awareness of
the benefits of computers in the humanities.
 
===============================================================================
*Hale, Melinda M.
 
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        I am 23 years old and I live in Boston, having moved here from
Washington, D.C., where I attended and graduated from The American
University.  Though not *officially* a Shakespeare scholar, I took 4
Shakespeare classes in college, have read nearly all of the plays, and my
well-loved (beat-up) Riverside is full of underlines and marginal notes.  I
have a degree in Medieval/Renaissance History, especially Elizabethan
England, but I have not published any papers (yet).
 
        As far as my take on Shakespeare, what can I tell you?  I believe
he was a real person who did write those plays and poems.  I believe the
plays work best when read as a whole, in the order he meant them to be
read.  I believe recategorizing some of the comedies and tragedies as
"Romances" misses the point.  I believe his collaboration with John
Fletcher on _Two Noble Kinsmen_ strengthens, not weakens, some of
Shakespeare's "themes", namely fellowship and torch-passing.  I believe
much more can be learned from Shakespeare's text than simply literary or
dramatic form.
 
I'm sure I could ramble on, but I'm beginning to sound like a catechism.
If you need more information, please let me know.
 
===============================================================================
*Skura, Meredith Ane
 
<
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Meredith Anne Skura is a Professor of English at Rice University (P.O. Box
1892, Houston, Texas 77251).  She is the author of "The Literary Use of the
Psychoanalytic Process" (Yale 1981) and "Shakespeare the Actor and the Purposes
of Playing" (Chicago 1993).  Ongoing interests include Shakespeare's sources
(all kinds, literary and non-literary) and early modern biography.
 
===============================================================================
*Hills, Mathilda M.
 
<
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Mathilda M. Hills, Associate Professor
Department of English
University of Rhode Island
Kingston, RI 02881
Tel. 401 792-5931
Ph. D. Duke University, 1970
Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, 1955
Radcliffe College, B.A. 1954
 
Publication:  *Time, Space and Structure in "King Lear"*, Salzburg, 1976.
 
===============================================================================
*LoMonico, Mike
 
<
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I have taught Shakespeare at Farmingdale High School on Long Island, NY
for 25 years.  Since 1986, I have worked with The Folger Shakespeare
Library, first as a participant in some of the summer Institutes and
later as a Master Teacher and Certified Trainer through the US Dept. of
Education.  I have done workshops and trainings for teachers throughout
the nation based on material developed by the Folger under Peggy O'Brien.
 
I am particularly interested in Shakespeare and Technology, particularly
innovative uses of video.  I have written a few articles about using
WordCruncher, the computerized Riverside Shakespeare with indexing and
concordance ability.  My high school students have discovered some
exciting uses for this program.
 
===============================================================================
*Senoff, Shirley
 
<
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 <Date of biography>  1992-12-5
 <Name>  Senoff, Shirley
 <Institution>  University of Guelph
 <Department>  English and French
 <Title>  Undergraduate Student (fourth year)
 <Email>  
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   or 
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 <Phone>
 <Address>  P.O. 48-2038,
   <Line>   University of Guelph.
   <Line>   Guelph, Ontario
 <Country>  CANADA
 <Postal Code>  N1G 2W1
 <Professional Associations>
 <Interests (key words)>  Comparative Lit., Medieval Lit., Theory
 <Biographical sketch (ca. 100-500 words)>
 
Hello!  I am currently in my fourth and final year of a double major
degree in English and French at the University of Guelph.  I'm in the
process of learning how to access various e-lists, and am pleased to
discover that there is a big world of e-communication fans (like me)
out there!
 
My interests in literature are quite varied, ranging from medieval to
modern stuff.  I am a great fan of Chaucer, Milton, Proust, Leonard
Cohen, and Alice Munro, among others.  I also like to dabble in
philosophy, but make no pretences of being an expert in that area!!
Ultimately I aim to do graduate work in Comparative Literature.  I will
be taking a course on Shakespeare's Tragedies this winter, and am very
much looking forward to it.
 
I love to receive e-mail, so if you would like to find out more about
the Royal City of Guelph or its university, or just want to chat, by
all means feel free to send me an e-message, and I will reply as
promptly as possible!
 
==============================================================================
*Campbell, Gardner
 
<
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Name:  Gardner Campbell
Institution:  University of San Diego
Department:  English
Title:  Assistant Professor
Email:  Campbell@acusd.bitnet
        
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  (Internet)
Phone:  (619) 260-4600 x2505
Address:  5998 Alcala Park
          San Diego, CA 92117 USA
Professional Associations:  Modern Language Association,
Milton Society.
Biographical Sketch:
 
I'm a Miltonist by training, a Shakespearean by association and pedagogical
exigency.   My work these days is centered around the idea of the subject as
essentially *provocative*, constituting itself as a provocative agent or an
object of provocation.  I draw on Bakhtin for my work, as well some of Paolo
Valesio's and Francis Jacques' recent writings. Lately I'm finding myself more
and more interested in Nicolas of Cusa, the Cambridge Platonists, and
existential phenomenology, a potent cocktail.  I continue to work on issues of
voice and performance in poetry generally, and now Shakespeare specifically.
 
Besides Renaissance studies, film studies and writing instruction (especially
computer-mediated conversation and instruction) are my secondary areas of
interest.  My tastes are all over the map:  I include writers from C. S. Lewis
to William Kerrigan (my Milton teacher) to Oliver Sacks to Diane McColley to
Lester Bangs on my shelf of honor.  I'm a computer nerd, an amateur (and
occasionally semi-pro) musician and chorister, a former disc jockey, and the
doting father of two-year-old Ian.
 
==============================================================================
*LoMonico, Maura
 
<
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My name is Maura LoMonico.  I am a Freshman at The Johns Hopkins University
in Baltimore, Maryland, where I am a member of the Humanities Area Major.  I
am presently enrolled in "Shakespeare Before 1600," a course taught by
Professor Jonathan Goldberg.  I plan to continue my Shakespeare studies
throughout the rest of my undergraduate, and possibly graduate, studies.
 
===============================================================================
*Eldridge, Lisa
 
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I began studying Shakespeare's plays as texts to be acted when I
was 13.  I've always enjoyed reading and performing his wonderful
plays.
 
===============================================================================
*Small, Susan
 
<
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17, Monument Road,
Hillsborough,
County Down,
Northern Ireland BT26 6HT
U.K.
 
I  took my degree at  Oxford, and am now  doing research for a doctorate at
Queen's, Belfast.
 
My  research topic  centres on  images of  the body  in Shakespeare, and on the
relationship between word and image in the Renaissance.
 
I aim to look specifically at literary images which tell of  the  creating
body,  and  to  establish a relationship between such images and the creative
power of the artist. I would also like to  look at interpretations of
Shakespeare in  art,  and  through  them  to  consider the relationship between
word and image.
 
I  assert  that  the  extent  to  which characters in Shakespeare have power
over the creative faculties of their bodies (be  it in  the procreation  of
children  or in  the imaginative power  of dreams)  reveals the  extent to
which they can effect an  ability to control the  play's outcome. (So Macbeth
speaks of  the impossibility of lineality  when he reflects on his "barren
sceptre", the existence of which ensures  his  tenuous  grasp  on  kingship,
parentage  and dramatic control.)
 
The image of the creating  body seems to me to be an  apt one when considering
Shakespeare's position of  influence, particularly in his paternal inheritance
to the artists  of the late 18th and 19th centuries. By relating Shakespearean
imagery to later poetry, poetic drama, art and the novel, I hope to consider
the different prerogatives which form  and genre  ascribe  to  the  imagined
and  actual body, and to elaborate on the methods of onstage communication
which  do not  require  a   physical  presence  (narration,   ghosts,
visions...)  and  which  exist  to  exert  control over the brevity of dramatic
time. I will look at the ways in  which character and  body become  the
possession  of the  written word once committed to paper  (- why King John
should  have his soul fighting  for "elbow room"  inside his body  as he dies,
and why he envisages his death as wastepaper - "I am a scribbled form, Drawn
with a pen upon a parchment, and against this fire Do I shrink up.")
 
My research interests lie in Renaissance body image  and its  subsequent
development,  narration  within   dramatic enactment, comic  and tragic
conceptions of  the body, and private  and  public  character.  In  terms of
influence, I should  like  to  look  at  P.B.  and  Mary Shelley, Blake,
Coleridge,  Wordsworth,  Keats,  Byron  and  Austen;   also possibly Marlowe,
Jonson, Browning, George Eliot and Yeats.
 
Some critical works which I imagine to be germane to  my subject are Devon
Hodges' _Renaissance Fictions of  Anatomy,_ Woodbridge and Berry's _True Rites
and Maimed Rites_,  Helena Michie's _The Flesh Made Word_, Francis Fergusson's
_The Human Image in  Dramatic Literature_,  Merchant's _Shakespeare  and the
Artist_ and  Malcolm Salaman's _Shakespeare  in Pictorial Art_.
 
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*Peterson, Jean
 
<
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        Jean Peterson, Assistant Professor of English
        (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania)
        Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837  USA
        
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        I am involved with a number of projects: a book-length study of
Renaissance and Restoration drama, focusing on representations of gender and
subjectivity, and how those representations respond to the socio-political
changes of the 17th Century.
 
In short, my interests can be summarized: stage representations of gender in
both Renaissance and Restoration drama, developments in drama and stagecraft
from 1550-1700, theories of early modern subjectivity and the development of
character.
 
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©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.