Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1993 :: April ::
More on Branagh's *Ado*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 263.  Monday, 26 April 1993.
 
(1)     From:   Robert O'Connor <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 26 Apr 1993 12:17:02 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0262  More Rs to Branagh's *Ado*
 
(2)     From:   Paul Budra <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 25 Apr 93 21:35:54 PDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 4.0261  Re: Branagh's *Ado*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert O'Connor <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 26 Apr 1993 12:17:02 +1000
Subject: 4.0262  More Rs to Branagh's *Ado*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0262  More Rs to Branagh's *Ado*
 
Forgive my ignorance but I had no idea there was another Branagh film out -
thanks for the news!!!!
 
ROC
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Budra <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 25 Apr 93 21:35:54 PDT
Subject: 4.0261  Re: Branagh's *Ado*
Comment:        Re: SHK 4.0261  Re: Branagh's *Ado*
 
About the *Much Ado*--I agree that Reeves is a bust.  He has to stick
to mindless things like Point Break, or Bill and Ted's Excellent
Adventure (in which he's actually quite good).  My point is about
Keaton.  His portrayal of Dogberry got a lot of flack at the Atlanta
screening, but I rather liked it.  Dogberry is usually played as a
pompous buffoon, ignorant and only accidentally effectual.  He's a
charming clown.  Keaton plays him as a psycho--the town loon, who has
been given the constable's job because no one else wants it, and
because the criminally insane might be pretty good at law enforcement.
I liked the violence in the interrogation scene; it made perfect
sense, and helped explain Borachio's confession, which is something
that I've never bought.
 
I've always thought that the Dogberry scenes were hard to play
anyway.  The change of tone is SO great.  Going all the way and
depicting the seed, violent side of the Renaissance underclass as
really seedy and violent was a refreshing change.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.